Jump to content


Photo

Single Frame Stop Motion with Keystone K-32


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Christine Elfman

Christine Elfman

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Other

Posted 05 October 2010 - 12:50 AM

I am making a stop motion animation film using my great grandfather's Keystone Olympic K-32 double 8mm camera. I am wondering if the Frames per second setting is exact when using the single frame trigger for stop motion. I cannot perceive a difference when I pull the single frame trigger at either 12 fps or 48 fps. Is there a standard default frames per second that the single frame trigger corresponds to? Or are the same fps adjustments applicable to the single frame trigger. This camera is a wind up camera, and does not maintain constant speed throughout the time it unwinds / films. I am wondering what the effective shutter speed will be for the single frame setting in order to base my lighting / exposure. I am new to motion picture making. Coming from a background in still photography, it took me awhile to understand the rotary shutter's relationship to exposure. This camera's shutter angle is about 172 degrees.
Thanks for your consideration!
  • 0

#2 alexandros petin

alexandros petin
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 106 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • Athens Greece

Posted 05 October 2010 - 10:55 AM

hello

check this out

http://communication...-K32/index.html

i think page 7 might help

cheers
  • 0

#3 Christine Elfman

Christine Elfman

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Other

Posted 05 October 2010 - 06:43 PM

Thanks for your response!
I have the owners manual. I understand the exposure for continuous shooting, but i am still confused about the single frame mode. Do you think that the fps actually changes depending on the setting when you are in single frame mode? Or is there just one effective shutter speed for single frames?


hello

check this out

http://communication...-K32/index.html

i think page 7 might help

cheers


  • 0

#4 Dom Jaeger

Dom Jaeger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1599 posts
  • Other
  • Melbourne, Australia

Posted 05 October 2010 - 08:13 PM

Hi Christine,

I'm not familiar with that particular camera, but generally with spring-driven cameras the single frame exposure time is not greatly changed by the speed settings, and remains close to the exposure of the slowest speed. In the space of a single frame the spring needs to overcome the mechanism's inertia, and the governor doesn't get a chance to really regulate the speed.

So I'd guess your camera would have an exposure time of around 1/25 to 1/30 sec in single frame mode. But it can depend on the state of the camera's mechanism. You might want to do some testing to be safe.

PS I love that it's your great grandfather's camera, that makes it a pretty special project. Good luck!
  • 0


Glidecam

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

Visual Products

CineLab

Willys Widgets

Opal

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

FJS International, LLC

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

CineTape

Ritter Battery

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc