Jump to content


Photo

Lenses


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 Bruce Drakes

Bruce Drakes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Student

Posted 23 October 2010 - 08:13 AM

I'm thinking of upgrading to a DSLR camaera and I was wondering if someone could help me with something.

When looking for lenses, I often notice that on the description of certain lenses it says, for example, aperture 2.8.

Does that mean that this lens has only one stop which is 2.8 or does have it a range of stops and 2.8 is the widest it will open?

As you can tell, I'n new when it comes to lenses, as I've only been shooting with DV cameras with built on lenses.

Help much appreciated.
  • 0

#2 Edgar Dubrovskiy

Edgar Dubrovskiy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 348 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London

Posted 23 October 2010 - 09:03 AM

It means that the lens will open up to 2.8 with variety of other stops that are tighter - up to f16/f22 usually.
  • 0

#3 Stephen Williams

Stephen Williams
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4708 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Europe

Posted 23 October 2010 - 12:56 PM

I'm thinking of upgrading to a DSLR camaera and I was wondering if someone could help me with something.

When looking for lenses, I often notice that on the description of certain lenses it says, for example, aperture 2.8.

Does that mean that this lens has only one stop which is 2.8 or does have it a range of stops and 2.8 is the widest it will open?

As you can tell, I'n new when it comes to lenses, as I've only been shooting with DV cameras with built on lenses.

Help much appreciated.


Hi,

I don't think you should start spending any money on equipment yet, it would be better to go on a course for still photography, then you can get a feel for what lenses might be worth buying, for what you want to achieve.

Best,

Stephen
  • 0

#4 Bruce Drakes

Bruce Drakes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Student

Posted 23 October 2010 - 01:59 PM

Thanks for that.

I've been shooting on DV for a quite a while and I am looking to move into DSLRs. I figure the best way to learn would be try them out, I've already done a course in video production.

What would be better?

Buy a DSLR that comes with a zoom lens or buy the camera body with your own selection of lenses?
  • 0

#5 Francisco Ribeiro

Francisco Ribeiro

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 23 October 2010 - 05:56 PM

I need help.
I live in Brazil and have an Arriflex III varying the shutter up to 135 degrees. The mirror broke.
I need to buy a mirror for a 180 degree Arriflex III, where I buy?
Thank you.
Francisco Ribeiro
  • 0

#6 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7115 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 23 October 2010 - 11:06 PM

Bruce, I think that depends on how you like to shoot. Personally, I have a Nikon FM, which I love, and a 50mm Lens, and that's it. I've never changed lenses on that camera for when I'm out shooting (i'll move myself as opposed to zooming in) because I really like and trust that one lens. Other people I know have a Zoom lens which they like and love and work it well. I would say to learn on a Zoom is very nice to get an idea of what lengths do, but also make sure you work with it, to learn, with some discipline, to move in closer and see what that does, far away, mid ground, all for the same shot.
  • 0

#7 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5069 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 24 October 2010 - 03:56 AM

I need help.
I live in Brazil and have an Arriflex III varying the shutter up to 135 degrees. The mirror broke.
I need to buy a mirror for a 180 degree Arriflex III, where I buy?
Thank you.
Francisco Ribeiro


You should ask this in the Arri section rather in the middle of another thread.

Check with Arri at Arri.com for your local agent.
  • 0

#8 Bruce Drakes

Bruce Drakes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Student

Posted 24 October 2010 - 06:48 AM

Thank you for sound advice there Adrian really appreicate that. Another matter which is slighting concerning me is when you see a lens that has a aperture range of 3.5 to 5.6, doesn't that seem a bit restrictive? Say if you needed a stop that was out of those ranges, what would you do? Change lenses? Change ISO? Bring in filters?

Thanks again for anyones help.
  • 0

#9 Hal Smith

Hal Smith
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2280 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • OKC area

Posted 24 October 2010 - 09:56 AM

I need help.
I live in Brazil and have an Arriflex III varying the shutter up to 135 degrees. The mirror broke.
I need to buy a mirror for a 180 degree Arriflex III, where I buy?
Thank you.
Francisco Ribeiro


They show up on eBay from time to time.
  • 0

#10 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7115 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 24 October 2010 - 10:04 AM

It can be, but with a stills camera you can adjust your shutter speed to get an exposure, though for DoF this can be challenging. That being said, a 3.5 5.6 lens is what most stills cameras come with from the dealer when buying. The only times it becomes restrictive is when working at night, even on high speed film. Normally when out shooting in daylight, you'll have no trouble accommodating a 5.6 with 100 speed film ;)
  • 0

#11 Bruce Drakes

Bruce Drakes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Student

Posted 24 October 2010 - 05:46 PM

Oh ok, but isn't it recommended that you keep the shutter at 1/50 when shooting video?
  • 0

#12 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7115 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 24 October 2010 - 05:54 PM

For video, for stills I try to keep my shutter at 1/lens of higher (for example 1/50 for a 50mm lens of faster, 1/150 for a 135 mm lens etc).
Now if you're buying a DSLR for video work only, as your post seems to suggest, I'd recommend against it, that's just me, but once you kit it out to shoot good footage you'll spend more than buying a good video camera. However, if you persist, and you really want to use a vDSLR, then you'd want to get prime lenses, and OLD MANUAL ones at that. Avoid any AUTO Lens, even if in Manual mode as they can really be more trouble than they are worth.
  • 0

#13 Bruce Drakes

Bruce Drakes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Student

Posted 25 October 2010 - 01:53 PM

For video, for stills I try to keep my shutter at 1/lens of higher (for example 1/50 for a 50mm lens of faster, 1/150 for a 135 mm lens etc).
Now if you're buying a DSLR for video work only, as your post seems to suggest, I'd recommend against it, that's just me, but once you kit it out to shoot good footage you'll spend more than buying a good video camera. However, if you persist, and you really want to use a vDSLR, then you'd want to get prime lenses, and OLD MANUAL ones at that. Avoid any AUTO Lens, even if in Manual mode as they can really be more trouble than they are worth.


Why would you recommend against it?
  • 0

#14 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7115 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 25 October 2010 - 02:48 PM

Well, my personal feeling is thus:

you'll learn more through learning discipline than by shooting willy nilly; and if you've already shot a lot of video then there isn't too much more to learn from a vDSLR, aside from how to change lenses. I would say it is better to learn to think about what you're doing, as you do through stills on film for example, than by just doing. That's just me of course.
  • 0

#15 John Sprung

John Sprung
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4635 posts
  • Other

Posted 25 October 2010 - 04:04 PM

They show up on eBay from time to time.


Even if you can buy one, putting it in is an ultra high precision job. Definitely take this one to an expert.




-- J.S.
  • 0


Metropolis Post

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Technodolly

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

Visual Products

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Opal

Tai Audio

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine