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Student in need of help


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#1 Austin mpho malema

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Posted 24 October 2010 - 08:51 AM

Guys is it possible to shoot an interior scene with kodak 250D Vision stock with tungsten lights and no filter. Its a student film. We get 1 HMI 1.5, 3 Blondes, 3 Red heads and 2* 2 K Mole light, and 3 flags. plz help
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 24 October 2010 - 10:10 AM

Sure it is. I would shoot with CTO on the HMI to get everything the same color temperature; then you can dial out the orange cast in post, if you want to.
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#3 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 25 October 2010 - 12:25 AM

OR you could shoot with an 80A filter and correct exposure 2 stops. B)
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#4 Austin mpho malema

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Posted 25 October 2010 - 02:36 PM

James we not allowed any extra equipment because they are student films. Thank you Adrian
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#5 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 26 October 2010 - 01:40 AM

Oh sorry, I just glanced at the post and didn't see the "no filters" there which I must say is kinda bizarre. Why wouldn't you professors want you to learn how to use filters, I mean they ARE a significant part of the film making process. Oh well, I suppose they're trying to teach you there are often several ways to approach a problem......or something like that. :unsure:
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#6 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 26 October 2010 - 09:29 AM

Oh sorry, I just glanced at the post and didn't see the "no filters" there which I must say is kinda bizarre. Why wouldn't you professors want you to learn how to use filters, I mean they ARE a significant part of the film making process. Oh well, I suppose they're trying to teach you there are often several ways to approach a problem......or something like that. :unsure:


Most basic filmmaking class nowadays don't venture very far into filtration. And depending upon the school and how many film classes they offer, some may not consider filters a critical learning tool when they could purchase a set of barndoors for their lights for about the same price. The school can teach the same concept of color temperature/balancing by purchasing gels...a far cheaper investment.
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#7 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 27 October 2010 - 12:49 AM

Most basic filmmaking class nowadays don't venture very far into filtration. And depending upon the school and how many film classes they offer, some may not consider filters a critical learning tool when they could purchase a set of barndoors for their lights for about the same price. The school can teach the same concept of color temperature/balancing by purchasing gels...a far cheaper investment.

OH GOOD LORD. :blink: Austin, learn the use of filters, dude and SERIOUSLY consider a new film school. B)

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 27 October 2010 - 12:51 AM.

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#8 JD Hartman

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Posted 27 October 2010 - 10:46 AM

Austin are you certain that the requirement, no filters, translates to no lighting gelatin? In reading the post, I may incorrectly be concluding that no camera filtration is allowed, 80A, ND, etc.
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#9 Tim O'Connor

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 06:10 PM

Film is balanced one way or the other and if you take your tungsten
balanced stock outside, the first step is to throw an on an 85, unless
you want to shoot it without correction. If you bring daylight stock inside
you correct for that on the camera or the lights.
Filters such as 85, 80, ND etc. are basic parts of shooting film and
could hardly be considered extra equipment in any sensible approach
to production. If that is the program's requirement I would challenge it or
look elsewhere.

It would be strange to have a production that would include any HMI and rule
out a filter as being extra equipment.
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#10 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 11:42 AM

Shoot without gels or filters, mix the lights, correct halfway to orange in post.
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#11 Phil Connolly

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 05:39 AM

I would either gel the lights or use a camera filter. Who cares if your breaking the film schools stupid rule's, your aim is to make the best film possible.

Better to seek forgiveness then ask permission and most filmschools should encourage a bit of rule breaking. I'd have thought lighting gels don't count anyways - your possibly going to want to put something on the lights anyway - scrims, diffusion etc... even if you don't use color correction.

I never had any problems when I 'broke' the rules at film school - eg using HMI's when the project allowed red-heads only. Its your job to be pushing at the boundaries - the filmmakers that obey all the rules are usually the less successful. Your only priority is to make a good film - everything else will be forgotten if the films good enough
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#12 K Borowski

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 12:27 PM

If you can't get the filter from the school then go out and buy your own damn filter.


It's a stupid waste of time to do this in post, unless you are participating in an exercise to determine the effects of different types of light uncorrected (shooting the same stock under fluorescent, daylight, tungsten, mercury vapor, sodium vapor, etc.).
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#13 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 03:14 PM

Guys is it possible to shoot an interior scene with kodak 250D Vision stock with tungsten lights and no filter. Its a student film. We get 1 HMI 1.5, 3 Blondes, 3 Red heads and 2* 2 K Mole light, and 3 flags. plz help



Does the interior scene have windows with real daylight coming through them?

How big is the space you have to light?

Do you have access to C.T.Blue light gels, even previously used some? If you don't could you get a spark or a gaffer to give you some from a set, where they are being thrown away?


Do you want to mix light or do you want it all to match?
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#14 Tom Sykes

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Posted 02 November 2010 - 01:19 PM

At the film course I am on we are taught how to use filters etc, In fact i've just bought some CTO for a shoot next week, but...

.. there have been a few tasks in the past on the course where we have been given a brief for a shoot/project, with equipment that is provided, and to only use this equipment and none other, thus spawning more creaticity, maybe this is part of your project brief Austin?

If not, i agree with the other's. Buy, steal, borrow some gels and make the best film you can. You seem to have enough lighting equipment, surely they can't specify you can't use gels/'filters'.

Good luck with it anyway :)
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