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Canon Scoopic


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#1 John Richardson

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Posted 25 October 2010 - 06:44 PM

Hello all,

I recently found a Canon Scoopic MS in a op shop and wanted to know how to tell if the battery needs re-celling? It powers on the camera and reads as the battery is charged (goes to blue) but I know the camera hasn't been used for a long time (5 years). Any help would be much appreciated.

J
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#2 Will Montgomery

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Posted 25 October 2010 - 07:13 PM

Shoot a few test rolls. They could be ok. You would notice issues more at higher speeds if there was a problem.

It's reasonable to recell them. I just had 4 done at Batteries Plus+ for $49 each. See if there is a franchise near you, they are a great resource for all kinds of old, out of date rechargeable batteries. Most other places want $125 or so to do it.
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#3 John Richardson

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Posted 25 October 2010 - 09:18 PM

Ok great. Thanks for the tip Will, much appreciated.

J
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#4 John Richardson

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Posted 25 October 2010 - 11:14 PM

One other thing - pls excuse my newbie question :rolleyes: - Does the scoopic always need to be loaded in a changing bag or is "subdued light" OK?

Cheers
J
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#5 Ian Cooper

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Posted 26 October 2010 - 02:32 AM

So long as you're using 100ft loads of film (which are the only ones that will go inside the Scoopic) then these are supplied on daylight safe spools that have solid sides to protect the film from light.

It'll probably be best not to load the camera in bright sun, but I've loaded 500asa film just in the 'normal' ambient lighting without experiencing any problems.

After loading, you need to run the camera to 'wind on' the bit of film you fogged during the loading process. This will vary according to the camera design, but is probably around 10 to 15 seconds.

If you unload the camera in a changing bag (usually just a case of opening it up and taking the spool out - so dead easy) then you won't fog the last 10-15 seconds or so of film you shot ;)
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#6 Will Montgomery

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Posted 26 October 2010 - 08:45 AM

One of the few advantages of shooting standard 16 vs. Super 16 is not having to worry as much about edge fogging with daylight spools. Still always a good practice to load and unload in "subdued" lighting if not a changing bag. That Scoopic is by far the easiest 16mm camera to load. It's like those old B&H auto threading projectors we used to have in school (back in the day.)
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#7 Dimitri Zaunders

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Posted 26 October 2010 - 01:17 PM

Since I'm a student (read: cheap), I always load and unload the Scoopic in a changing bag to get the most out of my film stock. Realistically the 15-20 feet you'll fog is only worth a couple of dollars, plus the rolls are generally a bit longer than 100ft to compensate, but still...did I mention I'm cheap?
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#8 Oliver Christoph Kochs

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Posted 26 October 2010 - 01:48 PM

...did I mention I'm cheap?

No, you're not. You are just precautious which is absolutely right. Using a bag to load and unload is more a time issue than anything else. But i hear very often that people very much like the rollout effect of the film (that fading to red and white). "Wow, how did you create that beautiful sixties art-look?".
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#9 Will Montgomery

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Posted 26 October 2010 - 04:03 PM

"Wow, how did you create that beautiful sixties art-look?".

Usually followed by "where can I buy that plugin?"
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#10 John Richardson

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Posted 26 October 2010 - 08:03 PM

:D Haha, awesome thanks for the advice guys, i'm looking forward to giving the camera a go. Also does anyone know if 500ASA is the fastest stock available on 100ft daylight spools?
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#11 Ian Cooper

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Posted 27 October 2010 - 01:41 AM

500asa is the fastest stock available in any form.
(and yes, it is available on 100ft spools)

Kodak 7229 V2 Expression 500T
Kodak 7219 V3 500T
Fuji 8647 Vivid 500T
Fuji 8673 Eterna 500T
Fuji 8692 Reala 500D
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#12 John Richardson

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 02:32 AM

Thanks Ian. For some reason I thought there was a 800asa stock. I like your videos too btw.

J
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#13 Ian Cooper

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 02:42 AM

...For some reason I thought there was a 800asa stock...


There was Kodak 7289 - Vision 800T, but that was discontinued a number of years ago.




I like your videos too btw.


Posted Image
Thank you.
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#14 Will Montgomery

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 08:48 AM

There was Kodak 7289 - Vision 800T, but that was discontinued a number of years ago.

I don't say this about many stocks ever but 7289 for 16mm was an ugly stock. That being said I always thought it would be fun to shoot some Fuji 1600 color or some 3200 b&w stock reperfed for 16mm. Just to see what we'd get.
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Rig Wheels Passport

CineLab

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Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio