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Continuity Editing


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#1 Simon Hildwein

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Posted 27 October 2010 - 06:55 AM

Hello,

Im a animation student, and very new to cinematography related problems. So I have a lot of questions. Currently Im in the pre-production stage of a shortfilm.

The story happens during a period of about two days but is compressed to the lenght of the film which is 5 min. My problem: The only "technique" I know, to bridge a time gap, is to fade the screen to black. But I also need editing techniques for shorter time gaps.

for example: a character graps a ball from the ground, then he walks ten steps and then he throws the ball. I dont want to show the whole action which might take 8 sec. If I cut and skip some time, is this a mistake?


This is a rough animatic,, which needs a lot of editing. Not long ago I heard the first time about continuity edting, 180 & 30 degree rule,..... Perhaps you could help me about that.
Its not finished
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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 27 October 2010 - 08:23 AM

for example: a character graps a ball from the ground, then he walks ten steps and then he throws the ball. I dont want to show the whole action which might take 8 sec. If I cut and skip some time, is this a mistake?


No, it's done all the time, editors commonly don't show a character walking across rooms in real time from when they walk in to their first line of dialogue. They take out most of the walk, for example having the character walking into frame to deliver the dialogue. Editing is about compressing and what matters is how well the cut works.

Well worth reading some books on editing, there are lots of cutting techniques that they use.
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#3 Mike Lary

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Posted 27 October 2010 - 08:49 AM

Hi Simon,

You should read Walter Murch's book 'In the Blink of an Eye'. It's a pretty short and easy read on editing that is packed with theory that can help you. Continuity is one of the last things you should worry about when editing. Emotion is most important. On framing and camera movement, you could read 'The Five C's of Cinematography.'

As far as compressing time is concerned, there are lots of things you could do. If he's shooting with a film camera (like in the animatic), you could show him placing a can of exposed film into his pack next to similar, marked and exposed cans. If he's doing a lot of walking, you could cut to a shot where he has his shoes off and he's relaxing under sunlight that has changed in directionality, color, and softness to indicate a later time of day. I would also think of the passage of time in relation to the character's emotional state and his motivation.
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