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Dropping out from film school and shooting a short film - thoughts?


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#1 Zahi Farah

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 06:37 PM

Hello everyone,

I have been an avid reader of this forum for quite some time and this question has been raised several times in different ways; my case is rather peculiar and this is why I've come - once more - for your advice/opinions on the matter.

Currently I am enrolled at the Met Film School (based inside the Ealing Studios campus in the United Kingdom), doing my first year of what is supposed to be a two year degree intensive practical filmmaking program. Basically its a practical filmmaking degree that you get in two years instead of three because its very intense.

The school, so far (a month in), has taught me quite some things and I am sure I will learn a lot more in the coming months. Reading through several different forums though (not only Cinematography.com), I have come to the conclusion that a film degree isn't that valuable. Sure, its credit but its not a necessary step into the industry.

So this is what I'm thinking of doing, switch to the one year certificate program and understand the ropes/basics of filmmaking and then go back to my home country (Lebanon) and use the tuition I was supposed to spend on the second year to shoot a short-film. That's 20.000£ or roughly 30.000$ - its not bad considering, I also think I could get some extra funding if I really put my heart and soul into it (I will).
I already own a Canon 5d mk2 (yes, I know, you guys aren't fond of it but I firmly believe that its a very useful and viable tool for semi-pro work + I'm into photography) and I have an idea for a script. Several ideas actually, most of them are doable.

Bear in mind that I could ultimately (its the plan so far) apply to NFTS (National Film and Television School) for my MA. I have talked to several tutors who have graduated from there and sometimes teach there and they told me its a good plan. They say - without hesitation - that having shot a short-film shows boldness and if shot well, is a great addition to my reel/portfolio and would definitely increase my chances of getting through the very harsh admission filter of the school. (PS: NFTS doesn't require you to own a BA to study there, having a strong reel/portfolio and proving you're dedicated enough will get you through).

So, long post I know, what do you guys think? I mean, some of you are already working out there, what do you think of people that approach with only a film diploma (BA) in their hands and a student reel? What do you think of people that have directed a short-film and own some sort of certificate? What would be more relevant?

Ultimately my goal is to direct movies (and later on to open a film school, but that's another topic ;)), I know that. I am also aware that a lot of people change their minds while they go through the education process, but I know what I want to do. I want to become a director and honestly, I really have this urge to shoot a movie.

You're feedback is very important to me and this is why I am here, if you need to be harsh by all means do.
What I need is the truth, don't worry about my "feelings".

Thanks in advance, and again, sorry about the length of this post. I just had to be clear.

Peace,
Zahi.
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 06:52 PM

I only care that the people whom I work with know what they're doing, and/or are honest enough to say when they don't and when they screw up, to admit it. I don't care how they got there, though I have a BA and a BS myself. In the end, the only feedback that really matters should be that which comes from within you. If you think it's right to strike out on your own, then do it. If you don't, then don't. Each person's way into this business is different, and what worked for one person won't necessarily translate to another.
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#3 Zahi Farah

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 06:54 PM

I only care that the people whom I work with know what they're doing, and/or are honest enough to say when they don't and when they screw up, to admit it. I don't care how they got there, though I have a BA and a BS myself. In the end, the only feedback that really matters should be that which comes from within you. If you think it's right to strike out on your own, then do it. If you don't, then don't. Each person's way into this business is different, and what worked for one person won't necessarily translate to another.


Point taken, thank you :)
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#4 Evan Ferrario

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 07:48 PM

I dropped out of school after 2 of 4 years for many of the same reasons you state. Film School is great for the basics, but it gives little real world experience and for the price you pay, yes you could make a film. I shot a feature on 16mm and HDV and after a year of working on it, played it in a festival which was a great experience but led to very little after that. Not knowing what to do next I shot another feature film, which evolved into a 25 minute short, and all during this time, I had to face the fact of my student loans without a degree, and the fact that independent filmmaking doesn't bring in much money. This bothered me enough to go back and finish. I finished school in a year and a half and moved to california. Since being here, I've learned leaps and bounds about actual production and post production, things that few film programs teach but are part of the everyday jobs of hollywood professionals. I feel I am to a point where my work experience keeps leading to new connections and job opportunities but the only thing that got me my work was the dreaded and much misunderstood skill of Networking to begin with. People were willing to meet and buy me lunch because they had gone to the same school and knew the same professors, this was the greatest benefit of finishing school for myself, it unlocked the door to my real education, which I feel has just begun.

The biggest point of film school, I now believe, is to surround yourself with others who want to work in television and film. These relationships with students and professors will be your ticket into the real world of professional filmmaking. No one gets their first job offer to be a PA on a filmset a month in advance, it comes as a last minute emergency where someone is sick and then they began asking everyone they know who is free to work. You need to be in that circle of people, and for myself, the key was finishing school and moving to LA. If you have connections already, then go for it.

Another thing to realize is that working in the industry doesn't necessarily get you closer to being a director. There isn't some set guidelines for the path to director, and it's not something you can just move up the ranks to become. What working in the industry will do for you is better equip your toolset. Then, if you maintain the drive to make your own movies, you will know how to complete this task on a professional level and more importantly, you will know what to do with your film and who to show it to once you have completed making it.

The truth of the matter is, The Rodriguez approach to becoming a director is a huge gamble and much less rare feat these days. There are literally thousands of people like you and me out there making feature films for nothing. I'm not saying it's not possible to be discovered overnight, but you better believe it's a gamble even for the most skilled of filmmakers. From my own experience, dropping out of school and making a film was putting all my eggs in one basket. What I needed to do, and feel I am doing, is find a way to make a living while always learning and improving as a filmmaker. I have consistently made a short film a year since my first movie, and with each, I improve immensely. Over the long run, I am increasing my chances while still making a living in the industry.

Now time is always a problem, and it will be no matter how much or less you have on your plate. I would suggest trying to make your film while still in school, this is what I wished I had done. Also as you move into the professional world, you will have a lot less creativity and freedom. I know you have a camera, but I would take every resource which the school offers you and try to make a kick-ass film. Then when you are finished this, take everything you learned and everything you wished you could of done differently, and do it again. Repeat this process until you are where you want to be.

ok, I've probably rambled on enough. It just struck me when I read your post how similar your situation was to mine a few years ago. And how tempting it was to drop school and work on something I felt was much more meaningful. I wish I had taken the shorter road of finishing school and making my film at the same time and I guess that's my point. By all means, keep making your own movies. If you are always working on a film, you will be worlds smarter with each one you do. But to surround yourself in the culture of other filmmakers, and start down the path of making a living, finishing school can be a great benefit.

And like Adrian said, there are exceptions to every rule and everyone takes a different path, it's all about finding what works for you. The only advice I can give which I know is 100% right is that you should never stop making films if that is where your heart is. The next and tricky step is to make money doing what you love and in a business where so much is chance, all you really can do is give yourself the best odds. Do that by getting your material out there, always meeting new people and always learning new skills.

Edited by Evan Ferrario, 28 October 2010 - 07:53 PM.

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#5 Zahi Farah

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 08:32 PM

I dropped out of school after 2 of 4 years for many of the same reasons you state. Film School is great for the basics, but it gives little real world experience and for the price you pay, yes you could make a film. I shot a feature on 16mm and HDV and after a year of working on it, played it in a festival which was a great experience but led to very little after that. Not knowing what to do next I shot another feature film, which evolved into a 25 minute short, and all during this time, I had to face the fact of my student loans without a degree, and the fact that independent filmmaking doesn't bring in much money. This bothered me enough to go back and finish. I finished school in a year and a half and moved to california. Since being here, I've learned leaps and bounds about actual production and post production, things that few film programs teach but are part of the everyday jobs of hollywood professionals. I feel I am to a point where my work experience keeps leading to new connections and job opportunities but the only thing that got me my work was the dreaded and much misunderstood skill of Networking to begin with. People were willing to meet and buy me lunch because they had gone to the same school and knew the same professors, this was the greatest benefit of finishing school for myself, it unlocked the door to my real education, which I feel has just begun.

The biggest point of film school, I now believe, is to surround yourself with others who want to work in television and film. These relationships with students and professors will be your ticket into the real world of professional filmmaking. No one gets their first job offer to be a PA on a filmset a month in advance, it comes as a last minute emergency where someone is sick and then they began asking everyone they know who is free to work. You need to be in that circle of people, and for myself, the key was finishing school and moving to LA. If you have connections already, then go for it.

Another thing to realize is that working in the industry doesn't necessarily get you closer to being a director. There isn't some set guidelines for the path to director, and it's not something you can just move up the ranks to become. What working in the industry will do for you is better equip your toolset. Then, if you maintain the drive to make your own movies, you will know how to complete this task on a professional level and more importantly, you will know what to do with your film and who to show it to once you have completed making it.

The truth of the matter is, The Rodriguez approach to becoming a director is a huge gamble and much less rare feat these days. There are literally thousands of people like you and me out there making feature films for nothing. I'm not saying it's not possible to be discovered overnight, but you better believe it's a gamble even for the most skilled of filmmakers. From my own experience, dropping out of school and making a film was putting all my eggs in one basket. What I needed to do, and feel I am doing, is find a way to make a living while always learning and improving as a filmmaker. I have consistently made a short film a year since my first movie, and with each, I improve immensely. Over the long run, I am increasing my chances while still making a living in the industry.

Now time is always a problem, and it will be no matter how much or less you have on your plate. I would suggest trying to make your film while still in school, this is what I wished I had done. Also as you move into the professional world, you will have a lot less creativity and freedom. I know you have a camera, but I would take every resource which the school offers you and try to make a kick-ass film. Then when you are finished this, take everything you learned and everything you wished you could of done differently, and do it again. Repeat this process until you are where you want to be.

ok, I've probably rambled on enough. It just struck me when I read your post how similar your situation was to mine a few years ago. And how tempting it was to drop school and work on something I felt was much more meaningful. I wish I had taken the shorter road of finishing school and making my film at the same time and I guess that's my point. By all means, keep making your own movies. If you are always working on a film, you will be worlds smarter with each one you do. But to surround yourself in the culture of other filmmakers, and start down the path of making a living, finishing school can be a great benefit.

And like Adrian said, there are exceptions to every rule and everyone takes a different path, it's all about finding what works for you. The only advice I can give which I know is 100% right is that you should never stop making films if that is where your heart is. The next and tricky step is to make money doing what you love and in a business where so much is chance, all you really can do is give yourself the best odds. Do that by getting your material out there, always meeting new people and always learning new skills.


Wow, Evan, I cannot thank you enough for this. Really, I was just refreshing this page one last time before going to bed (I've got an awful flu and its 2h20 in the morning, I'm about to faint) - but really, thank you so much for taking the time to reply in such an in-depth manner. I really, really appreciate it.

I've got a few questions on my own now in reply to that, mind you after posting this I will have to sleep I am literally falling asleep on my keyboard! (I will check this first thing in the morning though). So my questions are as follow:

1- First of all, have you uploaded your movie on the web? If so I would love to watch it.
2- How important is a degree? Also, I will have a one year practical filmmaking certificate, is that helpful or negligible?
3- When you moved to California and started working, how was it? I mean, what job did you get and how was the adaptation process from film school to film set?
4- Did you always want to be a director? And if so, are you a director today? (I seem to understand that this is a work in process, if it is the case just ignore this question :))
5- What about exposure? Did the festivals help or not?

I can probably come up with more questions, but honestly I can't think straight at the moment. Also, you don't really have to answer to these questions, I am much obliged as is! It would be awesome if you did though!

Peace and many thanks again,

Zahi.
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#6 Richard Boddington

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 04:37 PM

What I need is the truth, don't worry about my "feelings".


Perfect, Phil Rhodes will be here to assist you shortly. :D

R,
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#7 Zahi Farah

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 04:08 AM

Perfect, Phil Rhodes will be here to assist you shortly. :D

R,


Hopefully; I've been waiting for it.
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#8 Tom Sykes

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Posted 02 November 2010 - 08:13 PM

Hey Man.

I'm in my third year of a BSC in Film Production Technology.

In the first year, I didn't learn much, because I learnt most of it already on a diploma in Media and Moving Image before going to University.

In my 2nd year I studied a module in Cinematography, and this has shaped my future and I now know or am sure I know where exactly it is I want to be.

Now the breach between 2nd and 3rd year was the most important to me, because I had 'shone' in this year and got good grades, I got the opportunity to travel to Australia and camera assist on a feature that was being shot on RED.
Not only did this come about by being amongst film makers alike, but also having great networking capabilities within my program with my main senior lecturer being a DP himself.

Third year is crazy, there is a lot of stuff going on, and im learning something new everyday, technically it's a science degree which means i'm learning a lot about how a lot of technology works etc. I'm shooting my first feature in 3 days time, this wouldn't have come about if I didn't stay at 'film school' (I dislike this phrase, as I find it patronising for some reason).

Basically what i'm getting at, in a long winded, hopefully not tedious and trying to be helpful way is, I think if you stay, you would make vital contacts at your institution and this for me would be a more valuable experience than trying to fund a film from scratch and trying to get people to help you with it. The way I see it is, there is no rush to get to where your going, unless of course you've probably been told you have four months to live and it's on your life ambition list, in which case, there will be a lot of people who will help you :P.

I also have put all my eggs in one basket and am adamant on obtaining an MA at the NFTS. I have allowed 15 years to do this, I may not need this long, I may not even have the same plan after this length of time, but one thing I know for sure is, I've currently got something to aim for, and again, it's about building contacts.

This may or may not help you, I hope it does, or even sheds a new light on the matter, and good luck with your decision.

"Life is short, but long enough to achieve your dreams." Mr John Alton

Tom.
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#9 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 03 November 2010 - 03:47 AM

I've said it a million times, but I really don't understand the point of getting a degree in film production in a country where no films are made. I'm not going to try and find yet another way to say it - here's a post I made about this previously.

I'm just very cautious about anyone who's paying to go to film school in the UK. It won't pay off - you will almost certainly never make the money back, and you'll be in even more debt than everyone else who went through their childhood being told university was going to be free.
You can get the best people in the UK, and they'll be maybe a third as good as the best people in the US. They'll also teach you UK filmmaking, which is a fringe artform, as opposed to American filmmaking, which is a business and a career. This doesn't bear directly on UK schools, but it does make it much more attractive to go to one in the US if the finances are workable.

Really, all I can say is this: never pay for film education in the UK. It's not worth it.




Also


From what I have seen of Film schools in the UK they simply will not equip you for working in modern commercial filmmaking, which is almost invariably American filmmaking. The kind of production technique that's routinely taught here will be suitable for nothing more than the fringe-artform kind of filmmaking that's very occasionally pursued in the UK, and you will have no exposure to the critical US industry.



Do not waste your time.
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#10 Tom Sykes

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Posted 03 November 2010 - 05:34 AM

I've said it a million times, but I really don't understand the point of getting a degree in film production in a country where no films are made. I'm not going to try and find yet another way to say it - here's a post I made about this previously.

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Also


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Do not waste your time.


There are some valid points in what you say Phil,
which I agree with,

but with all due respect , but the University I am at teaches at a level where the students a fully trained and ready to go into mainstream filmmaking in the States, a few examples being students from the previous two years I have worked with have left straight from Uni and now live in LA, some films they have been working on being, Robin Hood, Where the wild Things Are, Clash of the Titans and one student who now works full time on Warner Bros books, these are a few examples of where it can get you.

I think the NFTS is an absolutely essential film school to attend over here and when talking about the prices, they are only a fraction of what you have to pay in the USA. I agree It is probably more intense over there and the learning is more in depth, but living in a nation where film is a dominant working lifestyle, that is always going to be the case.

There are hundreds of film schools across Europe, some are going to be bad, some are going to be excellent.
Does this mean to say that nobody should attend these schools because the learning isn't as good as the states? This is just an opinionated question and it looks to me as if your saying, you HAVE to move over to America to make decent films. There are many foreign films that blow mainstream Hollywood out of the water.

There are a lot of courses here in the UK that teach Film Studies and stuff like that, in this case I totally agree with what you are saying, but these are courses aimed at more academic type students and in terms of film, it would be a hell of a lot harder to make it in 'the business', as opposed to my course which is "Film Production Technology", the title illustrating what it basically is, it is considerably easier, but still hard.

I watched an interview yesterday with Wally Pfister, and a quote from this is along the lines of, "i think what people need to understand that cinematography is one part artistry, and one part craftsmanship, you have to learn the craftsmanship to apply the artistry, but people seem to confuse us with being technicians, we are anything but, and the important thing is that we are not treated as technicians but are treated as visual storytellers through an art form."

I'm not opposing what you say, like I said it is an opinion, but I have tried to state a reason why I believe film schools in the UK are not pointless, at least the one I am at isn't.

For some people it's about being the best, but for me, it's about making the viewer of my film/a film feel emotion through our images and personally even though I won't be anywhere near as qualified as American Cinematographers who are learning at the same age as me, but this can be possible with time, and as long as people like what they are seeing and the emotion is perceived in their own personal way, then this is all I care about, people tend to be to attached to money and lose sight of what I believe is massively an art form as much as it is technology.

Like many have said, everyone's path is different, I'm quite sure that if you are driven enough Zahi or anyone, you can make it one way or another, it just a matter of time and effort and the people you meet and collaborate with along the way.

Tom :).
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#11 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 03 November 2010 - 06:09 AM

the University I am at teaches at a level where the students a fully trained and ready to go into mainstream filmmaking in the States


How do you know?

They certainly aren't, there's nobody in the UK competent to teach it. Even if there was a UK industry, they'd teach UK techniques and procedures.

In any case, unless you have a route to a US work permit, you're going nowhere. This is the dream, go to film school, move to the states, have a great career. It does not happen.

I watched an interview yesterday with Wally Pfister, and a quote from this is along the lines of, "i think what people need to understand that cinematography is one part artistry, and one part craftsmanship, you have to learn the craftsmanship to apply the artistry, but people seem to confuse us with being technicians, we are anything but, and the important thing is that we are not treated as technicians but are treated as visual storytellers through an art form."



Let me make it extremely crystal clear to you. If you have US paperwork, you should have gone to school in the states. If you don't, you will be stuck here, and in that situation you should count yourself very lucky to even be "confused with a technician". You will not have to worry about the distinction between artistry, craftsmansip and technology. You will never get the chance; the question will not arise. You are so far from being a "visual storyteller" that it's preposterous. "Visual storytellers through an artform". Yeah, like burger flippers at McDonalds' are chefs.


it's about making the viewer of my film/a film feel emotion through our images


Oh, for pete's sake - this is just pathetic. No films are made here. Listen very carefully: you are never going to be a film director. You might as well apply to the UK space program, the Martian bungee jumping team, or any number of other things that do not exist.

perceived in their own personal way



Nobody cares about the personal way you perceive things. You're going to be making wedding videos. At best.

people tend to be to attached to money



Personally, I quite like eating food and sleeping indoors, yes.

God, was I this starry-eyed and obnoxious when I was 20? I don't think I was.
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#12 Tom Sykes

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Posted 03 November 2010 - 07:03 AM

How do you know?

They certainly aren't, there's nobody in the UK competent to teach it. Even if there was a UK industry, they'd teach UK techniques and procedures.

In any case, unless you have a route to a US work permit, you're going nowhere. This is the dream, go to film school, move to the states, have a great career. It does not happen.



Let me make it extremely crystal clear to you. If you have US paperwork, you should have gone to school in the states. If you don't, you will be stuck here, and in that situation you should count yourself very lucky to even be "confused with a technician". You will not have to worry about the distinction between artistry, craftsmansip and technology. You will never get the chance; the question will not arise. You are so far from being a "visual storyteller" that it's preposterous. "Visual storytellers through an artform". Yeah, like burger flippers at McDonalds' are chefs.




Oh, for pete's sake - this is just pathetic. No films are made here. Listen very carefully: you are never going to be a film director. You might as well apply to the UK space program, the Martian bungee jumping team, or any number of other things that do not exist.



Nobody cares about the personal way you perceive things. You're going to be making wedding videos. At best.



Personally, I quite like eating food and sleeping indoors, yes.

God, was I this starry-eyed and obnoxious when I was 20? I don't think I was.



Phil,

I stated a personal opinion, for you to say I was coming across unpleasantly is extremely unfair, I didn't say anything out of order did i?

I agree with some of the stuff you say which is totally fair on my behalf, yet when I stated something that differs from this, you have a blast at me and say I'm going to go nowhere, way to crush someones aspirations. Plus I don't want to become a director. I didn't state I wanted to go to America once. People i personally know, from THIS course are now working in America full time with permits.

"Visual story teller's through an art form" wasn't coming from me, but Wally Pfsiter, for someone of his caliber to be wrong is unlikely considering he is a well known and successful DP.

The film industry in the UK is VERY different to America but that's not to say there isn't one, there are many films that are/or have been made over here that are great, like I said they aren't Hollywood, but we aren't in the same league, I didn't state this wasn't the case or the fact that I want to become a Director, I don't expect this at all.

In terms of perceiving images in a certain way,

Like poetry and art, people make their own of what they are seeing and reading and apply it to their own lives or situations. If any cinematographer or filmmaker didn't care about how the image is being perceived by an audience then there would be no point what so ever in making films. The psychological aspects behind camera movement and framing an image in a certain way affects how somebody perceives an image, this is why a lot of people study psychology, sociology or anthropology and move on to being decent visual storytellers.

I sincerely apologize if this post comes across obnoxiously,
It was unfair of you to say so in the first post, but given the circumstance in this one, again I have stated my opinion and that only.

I hope you understand, and don't entirely disagree, I wasn't actually arguing and stated a friendly response, and was blown out of the water by what you said, for this I can only respond in the way I have, which is honest and totally unmotivated with dislike or for argumentative reasoning.

Thanks,
Tom.
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#13 Dom Jaeger

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Posted 03 November 2010 - 07:43 AM

God, was I this starry-eyed and obnoxious when I was 20? I don't think I was.


Don't know Phil, but if you were, the starry-eyed phase is definitely over.. :D
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#14 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 03 November 2010 - 07:50 AM

If any cinematographer or filmmaker didn't care about how the image is being perceived by an audience then there would be no point what so ever in making films




Congratulations, you've worked it out - there is no point whatsoever in making films, at least not round here.


P
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#15 Michael Kubaszak

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Posted 03 November 2010 - 08:51 AM

In regards to the topic. I think dropping out of school to shoot a short is a horrible idea. I shot 5 shorts while I was in film school that had nothing to do with any class and we used our school's equipment, which was invaluable. I also shot and directed a short on 35mm that had nothing to do with school.
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#16 Zahi Farah

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Posted 08 November 2010 - 04:48 PM

Godamn it! I've been checking my wrong email address! Thats why I didn't reply to all of this earlier since I wasn't getting the notifications!

Wow. Look at the replies and the heat :rolleyes:.

Alrighty then, onwards!

So as expected Phil did a massacre of film schools, Tom and Micheal are for it.

Now I would like, first, to thank you guys for your replies.

Phil said something in the likes of: "don't waste your money here, it doesn't meet the American standards" - but Mr. Rhodes, are you saying its not worth anything?

I mean, Andrey Tarkovsky graduated from a Russian filmschool and they only had 35mm's camera and what I imagine was very little equipment. What about Godart and Truffaut? What abt Eric Rohmer? These guys didn't use lots of gear. So my question would be, is the standard set by the equipment available or by the teachers?

You understand I my goal is to leave and shoot a movie in my country (Lebanon)? You also understand that it doesn't meet the "American standard" nor do I want it to? What do you think of that Phil? Your reply to this would be much, much appreciated.


Tom, your reply was indeed helpful, and I've heard great things about NFTS - some of my teachers have taught there and still occasionally do. I might consider someday going to complete my masters degree, but really, is it even necessary? I'm not sure.

I don't know why I feel I can develop my own aesthetic voice and tone if I just invest the time needed to do so. To think things over and develop my Art principles.

I guess I'll to have find out.

Thanks everyone for your replies, I'm sorry it took so long for me to answer! I need to change my account's setup. I'll do that right away.

Thanks again,
Peace,
Zahi.
  • 0

#17 Tom Jensen

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Posted 08 November 2010 - 04:55 PM

Students go to school, filmmakers make movies.
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#18 Zahi Farah

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Posted 08 November 2010 - 05:09 PM

Students go to school, filmmakers make movies.


Yes. But do u need to study to become a filmmaker? This is the question thats been slowly chewing through my brains for the past several months.

I need to know.
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#19 Tom Sykes

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Posted 08 November 2010 - 05:20 PM

Students go to school, filmmakers make movies.


That must make Roger Deakins a student then :P haha
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#20 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 08 November 2010 - 05:52 PM

Of course you need to study; it's a question of what and how you study-- in classroom or out.
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