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#1 Jim Campbell

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 08:43 PM

The video and a bit of blurb about it on my site at

http://www.someofmyw...85934/LIVE-NIKE

Would love to hear what people think or answer any questions on my workflow.

Thanks
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#2 Robert G Andrews

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Posted 04 November 2010 - 09:51 AM

Hi Jim, I just wanted to say that I like it. The idea was good, the music was good. I guess it was just this shoe in this colour that you were working with? (I have not read the web site)

My main problem with your film is that, (1) it wasn't sexy (2) it didn't make me feel anything, although it was a snappy beat, and (3) whilst the focus on the shoe worked, I felt that this film was rather impersonal and that you excluded the very part of the human who would be buying the shoe, i.e. the face.

If you would want me to buy this shoe, then I would like to see this film made a little more personal and that means I would like to see people's faces smiling and with excitement.

Finally, I liked your idea of using internationally-known landmarks and places.

Edited by Robert G Andrews, 04 November 2010 - 09:55 AM.

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#3 Ram Shani

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Posted 04 November 2010 - 01:17 PM

i loved it great concept and great look!
love the music

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#4 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 04 November 2010 - 03:44 PM

Well done. How did you mount the adapter on the lens? Is your Zeiss lens internal focusing? What I want to know is how you avoided getting skewed images form the Isco adapter. I have one and it is a pain to make sure the image is not skewed, but I guess since that is all you were doing (still plates) with no follow focusing, once you finally have it, is set it and forget it.
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#5 Jim Campbell

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Posted 05 November 2010 - 07:29 AM

Hi Saul

I mount the Isco on the CL with about 5-6 different stepper rings, it's a real Franken-setup. I generally set it at home by aiming it directly at a strong LED torch and aligning the top or bottom of the frame with the lens flare. It always gets knocked off a little here and there in the bag though, so some of them probably were a little less than perfect, but close enough not to jar.

I set focus on both the lens and the adapter and used a +0.5 diopter on most of the shots, though shooting deep at f22 for most of it too, the backgrounds are still soft in relation to the foreground since working with the diopter. But this was the only way I could ensure focus on the shoe at that close distance with the Iscorama. It's really tricky working with the Isco, but once you tame it a bit, it's well worth it, I just need to properly put it through it's paces now on something where I'd be moving the camera and pulling focus.

Well done. How did you mount the adapter on the lens? Is your Zeiss lens internal focusing? What I want to know is how you avoided getting skewed images form the Isco adapter. I have one and it is a pain to make sure the image is not skewed, but I guess since that is all you were doing (still plates) with no follow focusing, once you finally have it, is set it and forget it.


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#6 Jim Campbell

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Posted 05 November 2010 - 07:40 AM

I hear ya Robert. I did worry about that aspect myself. I did initially plan to work from different viewpoints and include more varied activities. But once the beat per footfall idea locked in, I found I liked the purity of this approach and attempted to bring (some) personality in elsewhere. Also, the idea that shot this entirely myself and they are my feet, meant I wasn't restricted to finding models, arranging dates and times for shoots etc, I just wore them and carried my camera around with me. The former involving budget (of which I had zero) and the latter not.

And yes, it was just that one pair of shoes, which on reflection I'd have much rathered work with a different pair or many different pairs.

Thanks for your feedback though, good to hear some of my own general concerns echoed.

Hi Jim, I just wanted to say that I like it. The idea was good, the music was good. I guess it was just this shoe in this colour that you were working with? (I have not read the web site)

My main problem with your film is that, (1) it wasn't sexy (2) it didn't make me feel anything, although it was a snappy beat, and (3) whilst the focus on the shoe worked, I felt that this film was rather impersonal and that you excluded the very part of the human who would be buying the shoe, i.e. the face.

If you would want me to buy this shoe, then I would like to see this film made a little more personal and that means I would like to see people's faces smiling and with excitement.

Finally, I liked your idea of using internationally-known landmarks and places.


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#7 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 05 November 2010 - 11:31 AM

Hi Saul

I mount the Isco on the CL with about 5-6 different stepper rings, it's a real Franken-setup. I generally set it at home by aiming it directly at a strong LED torch and aligning the top or bottom of the frame with the lens flare. It always gets knocked off a little here and there in the bag though, so some of them probably were a little less than perfect, but close enough not to jar.

I set focus on both the lens and the adapter and used a +0.5 diopter on most of the shots, though shooting deep at f22 for most of it too, the backgrounds are still soft in relation to the foreground since working with the diopter. But this was the only way I could ensure focus on the shoe at that close distance with the Iscorama. It's really tricky working with the Isco, but once you tame it a bit, it's well worth it, I just need to properly put it through it's paces now on something where I'd be moving the camera and pulling focus.


Right on. Thanks for the reply.
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#8 Aaron Freeder

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Posted 09 November 2010 - 07:24 PM

The video and a bit of blurb about it on my site at

http://www.someofmyw...85934/LIVE-NIKE

Would love to hear what people think or answer any questions on my workflow.

Thanks


Hey this looks fantastic. I've been researching a lot about shooting anamorphic on my 550D and I was wondering if you could give me some insight on your exact setup you have (which adapter do you use? perhaps the nikon ag-7200 or what seems to be the more common panasonic models? Did you use oldschool lenses?)

any and all info would be awesome if you could share, and great work!

also, how did you manage to keep such consistent framing?

Edited by Aaron Freeder, 09 November 2010 - 07:25 PM.

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#9 Boyd Hobbs

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Posted 13 November 2010 - 07:48 PM

I loved the look and colors a lot. I found three things I would have changed.

1. Screen direction. It's a general rule that going right to left means you are moving backwards, kind of like regressing. Left to right however, feels more like you are moving forwards. I would have had the runner moving that direction.

2. Shoe, I would have changed the shoe. It was a bit unexciting for the exciting feel of the spot.

3. (This one isn't related to the cinematography, more of directing) The runner(s). I think you just used one runner. I would have used multiple ones and had them actually running. It appeared they were just stepping in spot to hit their mark, felt a little slow. I'd have them full on running to give it more energy.
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#10 Jim Campbell

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Posted 14 November 2010 - 04:24 PM

Hey Aaron, it's an Iscorama 36 I used (Google it) and a Carl Zeiss Jena Flektogon 35mm f/2.4. As for the framing, it was just a matter of hitting a mark and trying roughly to get the same distance from the camera. But considering it was shot over a period of months, I reckon it's way off in quite a few of them and worse so in lots of shots I had to reject, but hopefully it's near enough.

Hey this looks fantastic. I've been researching a lot about shooting anamorphic on my 550D and I was wondering if you could give me some insight on your exact setup you have (which adapter do you use? perhaps the nikon ag-7200 or what seems to be the more common panasonic models? Did you use oldschool lenses?)

any and all info would be awesome if you could share, and great work!

also, how did you manage to keep such consistent framing?


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#11 Jim Campbell

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Posted 14 November 2010 - 04:38 PM

1. Yeah, I did think about that and well aware that movement should typically be from left to right, as you would read. But the Nike swoosh would then have been the wrong way round on the shoes. I'm sure this is a problem people working with Nike shoes have had in the past, I'll need to have a look around to see how they've got round it. I'll need to try flipping the mov to see how it looks actually.

2. That was the shoes I was supplied and believe me I'd have rathered not use it, I was cursing it, since it was silvery and reflective, it was a nightmare in sunny conditions, highlights blowing all over the shop. If I hadn't started this as a project about the shoe I was supplied I reckon I'd have tried to use a variety of shoes.

3. This was probably due to the runner being me, I was shooting myself and having to hit my own mark, which was really tricky at times, especially in water etc, but it was the self shooting nature of the ad that made it come together. I'd never have been able to shoot this for the budget I did (zero) if I had to resource models/actors or even just friends in all those locations.

I loved the look and colors a lot. I found three things I would have changed.

1. Screen direction. It's a general rule that going right to left means you are moving backwards, kind of like regressing. Left to right however, feels more like you are moving forwards. I would have had the runner moving that direction.

2. Shoe, I would have changed the shoe. It was a bit unexciting for the exciting feel of the spot.

3. (This one isn't related to the cinematography, more of directing) The runner(s). I think you just used one runner. I would have used multiple ones and had them actually running. It appeared they were just stepping in spot to hit their mark, felt a little slow. I'd have them full on running to give it more energy.


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#12 Jeremy M Lundborg

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Posted 14 November 2010 - 07:59 PM

There have been a lot of great comments here so I won't rehash. Love the concept.
Another off-cinematographic comment, you might think cutting a few different, shorter, versions of the spot. A couple 30-second versions with the same beginning and then different inters of the shoes hitting the ground as the commercial continues.
This sounds like more of what an agency would do to get more mileage out of a spot, but for me it runs a bit long. Throw in some different music and mix and match and keep today's micro-spanned audience attentive.
Another great way to change it up would have been to shoot from the knees or thighs down, with the ground changing beneath the runner.

Great work.
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#13 Robert G Andrews

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Posted 29 November 2010 - 03:49 PM

Jim, I don't normally add twice but since I was passing, I just wanted to say that:

If one feels something as a result of watching your ad then you won, if not, you lost. I think cool 'aint enough. We are human are we not... and for something to "work" and be "snappy" 'aint what it's about. I want to feel something and I didn't. I think therefore the idea is wrong. Sorry. I need to feel at least excited and want to say "I love this ad". I couldn't. So I think you should start again perhaps with people having a fun time in the sunshine and even the rain, but enjoying both, with kisses and smiles and hugs. Personally I'd forget the serious and sultry and go with smiles and fun and maybe marry that together with the actors using their mobile phones or social networking. Something current. Anyway, that's all from me on this. Good luck. Robert
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#14 Noah Yuan-Vogel

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 05:48 PM

Really nice concept and look. The anamorphic aspect ratio really feels right for this given the size of the shoe and the horizontal direction of all the action. Is it wider than 2.4:1? 16:9 with 1.5x anamorphic perhaps? (=2.66:1?) It's a great look and I'd be interested to know what kinds of things you did for the color, some of it almost looks HDR/tonemapped but never overly so, might just be the combination of low contrast grading and post sharpening.

Only criticisms I have at the moment are I had to watch it several times to appreciate the backgrounds since the cuts are so fast, and it seems a bit long for that sort of concept. It is very interesting, but too repetitive for more than a :30.

The lens looks really nice, but it sounds like it could be quite hard to use in a shot that does not have fixed focus and a static camera. I noticed the out of focus highlights in one ext night shot look a little funky, but i suppose that may be expected for an old lens, though they also dont look like your usual anamorphic bokeh. Any info you can give on this?
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#15 oscar vera

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Posted 14 December 2010 - 11:06 PM

zero budget:
first thing i'd like to say is: BRAVO very nice job.

I agree with the 30 secs cut,just keep the best shots (the ones with the coolest vibe and background)
i like how the music accelerates towards the end , nice.
i like the concept
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#16 Marcus Joseph

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Posted 19 December 2010 - 10:27 AM

Great work, fantastic stuff, I really liked it. And if you do wanna change the screen direction, you can always flop it in an editing program.
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#17 Justin Hayward

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Posted 20 December 2010 - 12:24 AM

The concept and execution are really great. Top notch.
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#18 Richard Boddington

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Posted 20 December 2010 - 12:44 AM

Very nicely done. You say: "So I shot the shoes in multiple locations and scenarios, filming across Europe through the summer, including Manchester, London, Paris, Nice, Genova, Milan, Zurich, Frankfurt, Brussels, Edinburgh and Nairn!"

Could you not have simply shot the shoe and foot making the step over blue screen, and then inserted stock footage of any location you wanted behind the shoe?

R,
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#19 Marcus Joseph

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Posted 22 December 2010 - 03:14 AM

Very nicely done. You say: "So I shot the shoes in multiple locations and scenarios, filming across Europe through the summer, including Manchester, London, Paris, Nice, Genova, Milan, Zurich, Frankfurt, Brussels, Edinburgh and Nairn!"

Could you not have simply shot the shoe and foot making the step over blue screen, and then inserted stock footage of any location you wanted behind the shoe?

R,

I thought that's what was done, but when I found out that it was actually shot location, made it ever the more impressive.

Edited by Marcus Joseph, 22 December 2010 - 03:16 AM.

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