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t2i Glow


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#1 Joel VanZeventer

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 10:57 AM

This is a still from a wedding I shot with a t2i with my nikon 50mm f1.4. I was shooting at f1.4 with a 1/2000 shutter speed. As you can see, I'm trying to understand why there is an odd glow around the people, especially the pastor and the brides head. (yeah I know real happy bride huh?) ;)

Anyways it doesn't look natural and if any one has insight into this I'd love to hear it.

Joel

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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 11:32 AM

The glow is by areas of huge overexposure, expose properly & the problem should go away.
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#3 Joel VanZeventer

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 11:59 AM

The glow is by areas of huge overexposure, expose properly & the problem should go away.


This is true. Although I believe I exposed properly for their faces. If I did, than there is nothing I can do in a situation like this when I am not in control of lighting. Would ND filters have helped? Or closing down the iris and adjusting shutter accordingly?
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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 01:10 PM

Had you closed down a bit and under-exposed the faces slightly it should've helped. it looks to me like that area of the sensor is just overloaded.

also you must use your real name to post here, this can be changed under the "display name," settings under "my settings," on the drop down menu on the upper right corner of the page.
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#5 Stephen Williams

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 01:40 PM

This is true. Although I believe I exposed properly for their faces. If I did, than there is nothing I can do in a situation like this when I am not in control of lighting. Would ND filters have helped? Or closing down the iris and adjusting shutter accordingly?


You have to expose the photo properly, pretty sure setting the camera to AUTO would have done better.
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#6 Garrett Shannon

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 04:13 PM

Most of that is caused by shooting wide open. I would be willing to bet if you shot the same thing at 1/250th of a second at an F4 you wouldn't have that effect.
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#7 Joel VanZeventer

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 02:29 PM

Most of that is caused by shooting wide open. I would be willing to bet if you shot the same thing at 1/250th of a second at an F4 you wouldn't have that effect.


I agree
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#8 Stephen Williams

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 03:17 PM

I agree


Not convinced as there is clearly an overexposure / sensor overload problem. It's fairly easy to test to see if it makes any difference.
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#9 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 03:37 PM

Not convinced as there is clearly an overexposure / sensor overload problem. It's fairly easy to test to see if it makes any difference.


The magenta fringing is a fairly common artifact of sensor overload.
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#10 Chris Keth

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 06:58 PM

This is true. Although I believe I exposed properly for their faces. If I did, than there is nothing I can do in a situation like this when I am not in control of lighting. Would ND filters have helped? Or closing down the iris and adjusting shutter accordingly?


I agree it's a massively overloaded sensor. You have to remember that, while you may have exposed for their faces, your photograph doesn't just contain faces. Without the control to light the area and cut down the contrast, this is the result. You probably could have stopped down a bit and then opened the shadows back up in post. That veil may have ended up just as blown out but you may have ended up with a sharper looking image.
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