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Annabelle- Short Film


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#1 Matt Smith

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 11:32 PM



This is a short film I shot as part of a three day film festival. It's a psychological thriller.

I shot with a Canon 7D and a Sigma 24-70mm f2.8. It'd be great to hear some opinions on it. Thanks!
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#2 Matt Smith

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Posted 02 December 2010 - 11:55 PM

Anyone?
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#3 Austin Serr

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Posted 03 December 2010 - 04:24 PM

You built up the tension fairly well but I felt like your shot choice could've been more thought out to add more to the piece. Like for example, in the park, you introduce the main character by having a shot of his hand slowly going up to his face. It doesn't really say anything about the character... it's just a shot of his hand going up to his face. You also introduce the girl by just having a shot of her hand as well. It's nice looking but it doesn't really say anything. Also (and this is totally up to you; I'm not saying it's wrong or anything, just giving food for thought) I think the tension would have been built up even more if every shot leading up to the scene in the apartment was either smooth dolly movement or just nicely composed static shots. It would make the handheld stuff that much more poignant in the apartment.

It seemed like you used natural light for the most part and it totally worked for me. The 2 shots on the subway looked great with your choice of white balancing and exposure (especially the shot of the girl). The one thing that bothered me was the cast shadow in the two shots of the main character leaving the apartment at the end. It was obvious that you had a single light on him and since the shadow was harsh and directly behind him, it seemed sort of stagy. The next time you're in a similar situation, I recommend lighting from above (with diffusion) to make it look like a ceiling light in the hallway. It'll look natural and you won't get that cast shadow (you could even use an actual household 70 or so watt bulb to light it; if the subject is standing directly underneath it, you should be able to get an ok exposure).
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#4 Matt Smith

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 02:48 AM

Thank you!

The director of the project chose to introduce the characters by their hands, since ultimately it is that effort of the main characters hands that create the real catalyst behind the plot. I did use alot of natural light in the film, as the apartment we were shooting had huge windows. Most lighting I did in the apartment itself was only supplemental. Looking back on that shot in the hallway, I think you are very correct in its "stagey" feeling. The director said he wanted that shot to feel incriminating, but I may have over done it with the single, hard source. We were also on pretty limited time and equipment constraints.So it was a quick way to light that shot. I just wish I had been more careful to maintain an even key light between that shot and the next one.
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