Jump to content


Photo

stinger gauge


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 ChrisHood

ChrisHood

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 02 November 2010 - 12:27 PM

I want to build some stingers and I want to know what gauge cable to use.
I have the Hubble ends and plan to use CAROL wire. I just need the gauge
and or part number. Length will be 50' and 25' and primarily for lights from
300W to 1000W.
  • 0

#2 John Sprung

John Sprung
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4635 posts
  • Other

Posted 02 November 2010 - 06:39 PM

Theoretically, you could go as light as AWG 16. But why bother? Get AWG 12, and you're covered for whatever might have an ordinary household plug on it, and you'll get less voltage drop with your small units. 12/3, of course, hot, neutral, and ground. For light duty cables, unless you really like doing the little wire stripper and screwdriver job, just buy them at Home Depot, Lowe's, etc.




-- J.S.
  • 0

#3 Michael E Brown

Michael E Brown
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 56 posts
  • Gaffer

Posted 02 November 2010 - 10:11 PM

For use as rentals, we do the following:

25-50: 12/3 S*
100: 10/3 S*

S (Extra Hard Usage Service Grade) grade is actually specified by the NEC for temporary cordage that's not protected. It's got a much thicker jacket that resists nicks, etc better along with general heavy traffic. Most of the time you will find SO (Oil resistant jacket), SOO (Outer and inner insulation oil resistant), SOOW (same plus outdoor rated - sunlight resistant and rated for wet environments). It's big and heavy, but worth it IMO.

SJ (Hard Usage Service Grade/Service Junior) has thinner insulation and jackets, and is OK - but it certainly can get nicked right to the copper much easier.

12/3 is good. For long runs, 10/3 is better - less voltage drop. Matters the most with tungsten fixtures, esp large tungsten fixtures. 14/3 SJ should be your minimum should you cheap out.

Hubbell is the best. By far. Looks like you've already figured that out. Don't buy them at the local electrical house, what a rip off. I buy a set of both ends in theatrical colors (solid black) for less than $10.

Something else to keep in mind with making your own cables is that you need to service them. Screw connections can loosen up over time causing increased resistance at the joint which can melt ends. Most of the time when you see a burned up end, it was a high current draw with a loose connection. Store bought cables have a leg up since most are permanently attached - crimped/soldered.
  • 0

#4 Ed Conley

Ed Conley
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 51 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 03 November 2010 - 11:21 AM

Hey Michael,

where do you by your connectors?

Ed
  • 0


Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

CineTape

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

FJS International, LLC

Technodolly

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Opal

Metropolis Post

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Technodolly

CineLab

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Willys Widgets