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Help identifying buttons/controls on my new Canon 814 Super8mm


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#1 Matt Stevens

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Posted 03 November 2010 - 01:12 PM

My two Canon Auto Zoom 814's arrived today (purchased off eBay). Both seem to operate. Put the batteries in and the motors run.

Unfortunately, the manual I found online is not for this version of the 814. Same model, but clearly from a different generation. Nothing is the same, so I just cannot figure out what most of these buttons are for. :blush:

This was a kind of crazy purchase. I know nothing about Super8mm. However, I very much want to learn.

Picture of my camera is below, along with numbers placed next to the parts I am clueless about.

#7 is in red. That knob does not move on the model pictured. It does on the other camera, but not this one. Is it jammed?

For #5, I know that turns the camera on, but what is the difference between R and RL?

Thanks for your help and please, apologies to you for being clueless. I've ordered some books on Super 8mm, but they have yet to arrive.

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#2 Jean-Louis Seguin

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Posted 03 November 2010 - 05:17 PM

Try this site:

http://www.mondofoto...m814electronic/

You will get tons of information there.

Good Luck!

Cheers,
Jean-Louis
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#3 Carl Looper

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Posted 04 November 2010 - 05:07 PM

This is from a distant memory of twenty five years ago - so don't quote me :)

1 & 2. Can't recall.
3. Footage counter - definitely. But in metres.
4. Press red button to test battery - the little window has a needle which moves across display to indicate battery strength.
5. Off mode - trigger does nothing. R: Run mode - trigger runs camera when held down, and stops camera when up. RL: Run lock mode - depress trigger to run, depress trigger again to stop.
6. Pull out to do manual exposure control - push back in for automatic exposure (AE).
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#4 Matt Stevens

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Posted 05 November 2010 - 11:35 AM

Thanks to everyone who lended me a help hand. I now know a lot more about this camera than when it arrived earlier this week.

Edited by Matt Stevens, 05 November 2010 - 11:35 AM.

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#5 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 08 November 2010 - 01:19 AM

1. This refers to exposure compensation. More specifically, the control of the aperture. For general filming, this should be set to the '0' setting / ie the setting with no numbers. It's most often used in combination with the variable shutter dial (which you have placed a red '7' next to.) For example, if you close down the variable shutter dial to the '2' position, you also move the exposure compensation switch to '2' as well. If you don't do this second step, your footage will be underexposed. You can also use the exposure compensation switch for scenes with backlighting. For example, if you're using the camera in auto exposure mode and there is a bright background behind your subject like the sky for example, then move the switch down to one of the numbers (while leaving the variable shutter dial at the 'open' setting.) The brighter the background, the higher the number that would be used.
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#6 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 08 November 2010 - 04:23 AM

Additional note: for most of your filming, the variable shutter dial should be set to 'open'. And the exposure compensation switch should be in the top position (I notice in the photo, it's currently in the '2' setting.) Just remember to check these two things when you get your camera out to film.

And another thing....with regards to focusing. There should be some sort of focusing aid in the middle of the viewfinder - usually either a microprism or split image rangefinder. You should use this for accurate focusing. The surrounding clear area in the viewfinder can be deceptive for checking focus - even if the subject looks sharp, the lens may actually be slightly out of focus. Also - always focus at the maximum telephoto setting of the zoom, and then zoom out wider to compose your shot. There should be information somewhere online for adjusting the viewfinder diopter to your individual eye sight.

Also...try to resist testing the slow motion feature when there is no film loaded in the camera. It's common beleif that doing so can cause harm to the camera's intermittent mechanism.

Happy filming!
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#7 Miguel Loredo

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Posted 09 November 2010 - 12:03 PM

The 814 in that picture is an "814 Autozoom Electronic" but without it's own lens... I don't know what the hell is that in it's front! It seems that it suffered from a heavy bricolage Sunday evening...

I think I can provide you with the owner's manual of any 814. Let me know exactly what model do you need and I'll send you by e-mail ok?
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