Jump to content


Photo

Types of Film Processing


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 deepak srinivasan

deepak srinivasan
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 41 posts
  • Best Boy
  • India

Posted 09 November 2010 - 01:19 AM

I have joined as an assistant cameraman & preparing myself to work in shoots effectively . I want to gain some knowledge about film processing. i dint do an professional cinematography course & my resources to learn are limited in my city . so i would like to get help from this forum to clear my doubt.

My Question is
1. What are the types of film processing in use from ancient days to recent days?
2. Any study material (links or books name) to know about the processing in detail?
3. Is the types of Film Processing common for all stocks like same for kodack & fuji ?

Kindly share your knowledge & help me know the topic better friends :)
Thanks in Advance :)
  • 0

#2 K Borowski

K Borowski
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3905 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • I.A.T.S.E. Local # 600 Eastern Region

Posted 09 November 2010 - 03:47 PM

This list is by no means complete:

Ancient/obsolete processes: K-11, K-12, K-13 (original Kodachrome processes), ECO (Ektachrome commercial_, EM-26, CRI-1, RVNP, ME-4, ECN-I, ECP-I, Technicolor dye imbibition printing, the original Fujicolor MP negative process (forget the name). ECP-2A?

Current Processes: B&W neg (several different developers, processing spec's, bleaches in use), also high-contrast developer for sound-track negatives, B&W print (more standardized, but still variation), B&W reversal, VNF-1 (only done special run; film has been discontinued since 2004) K-14 (Only available until 30 Dec., 2010), EM-26 Fuji variant, ECN-2 (standard color negative), ECP-2D (I think B & C are used, minor variations on bleach, and sound-track B&W developer), and E-6.

The only processes you will probably run into are ECN-2 and ECP-2D, maybe B&W neg./print, maybe E-6 & B&W rev..

All color negative and print films made, Kodak and Fuji for negative, plus Agfa for prints, are compatible with ECN-2 and ECP-2D, respectively.


As I mentioned above, there is much more variation with B&W development. Different labs use different developers and bleaches. All B&W film is compatible, but this will have an effect on your exposure.
  • 0

#3 K Borowski

K Borowski
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3905 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • I.A.T.S.E. Local # 600 Eastern Region

Posted 09 November 2010 - 05:45 PM

Missed your request for books on the subject. These are all in English that I have, assuming that is what you're looking for:

"Your Film and the Lab" L. Bernard Happe' 1983

This one is by Dominic Case, who posts on here frequently: "Motion Picture Film Processing" It's referenced in "Your Film" and the excerpts I have read are far better, in my opinion than "Your Film"

There is also a great article on it in "The American Cinematographer's Manual," 'The Cinematographer and the Laboratory' by Rob Hummel.


Of course there are many more. Most filmmaking handbooks that don't take a digital-only emphasis have good sections on film, laboratories, and stocks.

Chris Malkiwicz's (sp?) "Cinematography" book has a thorough section. His latest revised addition is co-authored by another forum member, David Mullen.



So, a lot of what is available there, has also been shared here personally by some of the very experienced great guys that contribute to the membership here. There are several others who actually work in film labs around the world that post in this forum.
  • 0

#4 deepak srinivasan

deepak srinivasan
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 41 posts
  • Best Boy
  • India

Posted 13 November 2010 - 09:53 AM

Missed your request for books on the subject. These are all in English that I have, assuming that is what you're looking for:

"Your Film and the Lab" L. Bernard Happe' 1983

This one is by Dominic Case, who posts on here frequently: "Motion Picture Film Processing" It's referenced in "Your Film" and the excerpts I have read are far better, in my opinion than "Your Film"

There is also a great article on it in "The American Cinematographer's Manual," 'The Cinematographer and the Laboratory' by Rob Hummel.


Of course there are many more. Most filmmaking handbooks that don't take a digital-only emphasis have good sections on film, laboratories, and stocks.

Chris Malkiwicz's (sp?) "Cinematography" book has a thorough section. His latest revised addition is co-authored by another forum member, David Mullen.



So, a lot of what is available there, has also been shared here personally by some of the very experienced great guys that contribute to the membership here. There are several others who actually work in film labs around the world that post in this forum.


  • 0

#5 deepak srinivasan

deepak srinivasan
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 41 posts
  • Best Boy
  • India

Posted 13 November 2010 - 09:55 AM

hello sir thanks for the reply :) it was very informative :)
  • 0


Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineLab

CineTape

Visual Products

Opal

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

CineLab

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

Opal

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc