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RAW to screen after CC and oversharpen the image


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#1 Markus Rave

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Posted 28 November 2010 - 07:20 AM

I have finished grading for my last feature to be released for final printout to film. Shooting was done 4k with a Red One, grading was done on a baselight system in 2k, respectively HD for better workflow. I would have preferred 4k but at present the postsuite could not provide fluent workflow.
We have managed a very consistent look for the film, grading sharp but not oversharp images leaving a fine gradient especially in the color of the eyes. Now the files are in a Flame system for some corrections. Here some of the pictures are sharpended since the director is very focused on the eyes of his characters. What jumps on me is that he is overdoing it. I am seeing that even with this highend tool the known artifacts like white seams between eyelid and eyeball start to appear. Also the look tilts toward a video look taking away the nuanced color in the eye towards a very hard almost monochrome feel.

I was pointing out my concern but the director wants to go this way. I also proposed a partial filmout and make decisions after projection but even there he disagreed. I am not alone with my concern and need someone who has fallen in that trap too. I am planning to have some DPX files printed out and project them side by side. I fear that the film will still show the artifacts because they will be magnified when projected. It might help a little that some grain will be there to hide them but also it might be the case that a soft edge will point them out even more.

Has anybody experience with that problem and might calm down my fear. Is there an argument that can be shown in the postsuite to point out what I mean? I see the problem that magnifying alone will also magnify pixel artifacts and those will cover sharpening artifacts.

Any help?
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#2 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 28 November 2010 - 10:06 AM

Oversharpening is a common beginner's mistake, cannot be easily undone later. I would suggest you ask for a print of 30 secs to 1 minute of typical shots before committing the entire film. Depending on the filmrecorder, additional sharpening may be automatically added (unwanted).
We commonly do short filmouts after every day of grading on a feature film, selecting some of the most difficult shots of the day. This way there are no surprises at the end, and everybody knows what we are getting.
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#3 Markus Rave

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Posted 29 November 2010 - 05:23 AM

Hi Dirk,

thanks a lot lot for your input. As mentioned I tried to get a printout but the director wants to rely on the monitor where I already can see oversharpening artifacts. Thanks for the hint that the filmout might add additional sharpness which I did not know.

Regards

Markus
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