Jump to content


Photo

Digtal to Film Transfer


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Roger Tillotson

Roger Tillotson

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Other

Posted 30 November 2010 - 07:39 AM

Hi,

Sorry for asking a question I'm sure this has come through here a few times but I haven't found many answers searching the forums.

I'm trying to research all information/options concerning transferring digital to film/Celluloid… time frame, costs etc.

Can anyone point me in the right direction for further info, or recommend someone/company to speak to.

Thanks in advance

Rog
  • 0

#2 Saul Rodgar

Saul Rodgar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1682 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 30 November 2010 - 02:30 PM

Several years ago, a friend of mine did a project that did that, but I think he used Technicolor (it is a ll a blur now). I'm not sure if they are still doing that, I couldn't find it on their website. The results are usually good, but it really depends on your source material and the method used to transfer to film -- particularly, if the footage has a lot of blown out highlights, you'll never recover detail there, and it'll look well, like crappy video. There are these guys, which seem to have a good track record:

http://www.dvfilm.com/faq.htm

Alternatively, you can do it yourself with a sync film camera, a steady tripod and a decently calibrated LCD HDTV. Do a test before you commit to it, tho. I have done it with good results, and there was a movie released 5-6 years ago called Nine Songs whose print was screened at festivals in Europe using that method. Some of us discussed the subject somewhat extensively a few years back on these boards, including the DP for Nine Songs. I'd search the archives if you want more information about it.
  • 0

#3 Roger Tillotson

Roger Tillotson

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Other

Posted 30 November 2010 - 02:53 PM

Several years ago, a friend of mine did a project that did that, but I think he used Technicolor (it is a ll a blur now). I'm not sure if they are still doing that, I couldn't find it on their website. The results are usually good, but it really depends on your source material and the method used to transfer to film -- particularly, if the footage has a lot of blown out highlights, you'll never recover detail there, and it'll look well, like crappy video. There are these guys, which seem to have a good track record:

http://www.dvfilm.com/faq.htm

Alternatively, you can do it yourself with a sync film camera, a steady tripod and a decently calibrated LCD HDTV. Do a test before you commit to it, tho. I have done it with good results, and there was a movie released 5-6 years ago called Nine Songs whose print was screened at festivals in Europe using that method. Some of us discussed the subject somewhat extensively a few years back on these boards, including the DP for Nine Songs. I'd search the archives if you want more information about it.


Hi Saul, Thanks for the reply, helpful to know it's worth searching the archives and thanks for the link, a good start to further my understanding and research. Much appreciate it.

Rog
  • 0

#4 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5069 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 30 November 2010 - 03:55 PM

It's been mentioned on a few threads, but for one or two prints the Cinevator makes sense.
  • 0


Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Glidecam

Visual Products

CineTape

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Opal

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Metropolis Post

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

The Slider

Glidecam

CineTape

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

FJS International, LLC

Technodolly

Ritter Battery