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K-14 Process


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#1 Michael Schroers

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Posted 05 December 2010 - 02:31 PM

Hello !

What do you think will be after 2010 about processing of Kodachrome films ?

I think, there are still a lot of unexposed films in the world and I'm not sure,
if there is really no lab which will be able to process kodacheomes . . .

What do you thing ?

Does anyone know something new ?

Michael
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#2 Ninos

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Posted 05 December 2010 - 03:06 PM

Yes, in Germany as possible
http://www.wittner-k...ilmentw.php#K14
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#3 John Salim

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Posted 05 December 2010 - 03:11 PM

Michael, It's a real shame about Kodachrome coming to an end.

Unfortunately K-14 is such a complicated process, nobody I'm sure will take it on.
Kodak supplies the chemicals and control films to enable its existence and I'm guessing they stopped manufacturing those by now.

Kodachrome ( like IB Technicolor ) will go down in imaging history - and photographers / cinematographers of the future will miss out big time. :(

No doubt some of the specialist labs processing K-14 as B&W will still thrive ( as there's still a ton of Kodachrome out there ), but they'll eventually dry up too.

I hope somebody's going to film and record the last processing run.

John S
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#4 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 05 December 2010 - 05:49 PM

Yes, in Germany as possible
http://www.wittner-k...ilmentw.php#K14

Wittner send their k14 to dwaynes in kansas like everybody else. Their web site indicates december 15 t]as the last day they will be posting to dwaynes I believe.
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#5 Hal Smith

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 09:31 PM

Good bye Kodachrome.

I shot four rolls of KR135-36 today with my Pentax Program Plus. Two of my brand new, born yesterday, first grandson and his family at the hospital, one of a fairly decent Oklahoma sunset, and to send K64 off to its reward, I chased my cats around the house and shop for an hour.

I shot most with my 50mm f1.4 SMC lens and a few with my 28-50mm f3.5-4.5 SMC compact zoom. I dusted off, and used my old Braun 440 Studio strobe for the interior shots.

FedEx got the four rolls at their north OKC station at 7PM and they'll be in Parsons, KS in the morning. The official cutoff is noon tomorrow.
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#6 Michael Batchelor

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 12:21 PM

Unfortunately K-14 is such a complicated process, nobody I'm sure will take it on.
Kodak supplies the chemicals and control films to enable its existence and I'm guessing they stopped manufacturing those by now.



Unfortunately there aren't any specialty labs that process Kodachrome. Everybody sent it to Dwayne's. So when Dwayne's quit, that was it for "official" processing anywhere.

But there is quite a bit of speculation that the remaining stocks of Kodachrome out there will come out of the woodwork in the future.

One guy at the Kodachrome Project has rescued a K-Lab machine and is actively attempting to resurrect it. http://www.kodachrom...hread.php?t=674

On the APUG site is a discussion, actually several discussions, about the chemistry requirements and tabletop processing. http://www.apug.org/...lm-formula.html Look toward the end of this thread.

Kodak processed Kodachrome by hand in the R&D labs, so it is certainly possible to do. But is it viable? Probably no less viable than someone pouring handmade wet-plates. People do it, but it isn't mainstream. The cost per image is either next to nothing if labor is left out, or it is astronomical if labor value is figured. I suspect tabletop Kodachrome processing will be the same way; thriving in the hobbyist world, and not worth the effort elsewhere.
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#7 K Borowski

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 02:19 PM

She's gone. Let her go.


I highly doubt a lot of the stories I've heard on the subject, especially hand-processing tales. You have to do THREE COLORED RE-EXPOSURES on this film and add three proprietary dyes. You have to used proprietary Kodak CD (color developers) one of which was made specifically for the K-14 process. I could probably do it, but I highly doubt I could do it well.

And I know chemistry. How much do you want to bet that pH and specific gravity of all of these solutions need to be critically controlled?


Since Kodak supplies the dyes and chemistry, the process is dead. They want it dead, and it is. E-6 is in pretty bad shape now too. Best to forget about K40A and K25 and concentrate on shooting what's available, Velvia and 7285 before they are gone forever too.
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#8 Martin Baumgarten

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Posted 06 August 2011 - 10:38 AM

Processing 'good' KODACHROME filmstock, that is of recent manufacture and/or has been cold stored since new if old, can still be done as Black & White Reversal or with rich brown tones done as B&W Reversal in Sepia. I offer processing here at Plattsburgh Photographic Services, NY in B&W Negative, B&W Reversal, or B&W Sepia tone Reversal. I know this thread is older, but with still so much interest and questioning regarding processing of KODACHROME movie films, especially in the Super 8mm and Double 8mm formats...I figured I'd add to this thread topic. And pricing is pretty reasonable compared to other places, so any one still having old film that they exposed or want to use up for a 'special' look, can still do so.
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