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lighting a a chiropractic office


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#1 Josh Phoenix

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Posted 05 December 2010 - 07:12 PM

Im shooting a chiropractic office and will probably have the chiropractor treating patients in different rooms and on different machines. I know nothing about lighting for film because i shoot mostly photography, but Im guessing I dont want a very dramatic lighting setup for this and I probably want to go light and bright. What kind of lights should I rent to accomplish this effect, and would I still use the 3 point lighting setup?\

Oh also, is there anything I should watch out for that is a general mistake beginners make(obviously there are a lot) but maybe the most made mistakes.

Thank you

Edited by Josh Phoenix, 05 December 2010 - 07:13 PM.

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#2 Ed Conley

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 01:15 PM

You really need to Plot out the shot list with Video/Film.

This is the biggest mistake Still Photographers make when trying to move in to a Video shoot and you'll grow old Editing all the Footage trying to cover everything.
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#3 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 01:44 PM

Im shooting a chiropractic office and will probably have the chiropractor treating patients in different rooms and on different machines. I know nothing about lighting for film because i shoot mostly photography, but Im guessing I dont want a very dramatic lighting setup for this and I probably want to go light and bright. What kind of lights should I rent to accomplish this effect, and would I still use the 3 point lighting setup?\

Oh also, is there anything I should watch out for that is a general mistake beginners make(obviously there are a lot) but maybe the most made mistakes.

Thank you


Lighting is about EITHER A) recreating and enhancing the NATURAL "look" (what it REALLY looks like in an environment) or B ) creating a new "look" via lighting that creates a specific mood or tone.

So, the question is, what is your footage supposed to do? Are you trying to invoke a specific mood or are you just shooting event/documentary coverage of what really is there?

Once you know that, then you can make decisions regarding the camera and the lighting that is necessary.


If you want "light and bright," then you likely may be able to just use the practical overhead lighting that is there, assuming that your camera can handle it. But if you need to keep that "look" but enhance it somewhat, then you likely just need a few small lights to fill in as the overheads just provide an unattractive "over" light that looks good on no one.


For most shoots, killing the practicals, particularly overhead fluorescents, is a great idea, even if your goal is to just recreate reality. Most video or film shoots happen BECAUSE someone wishes to "sell" something ( a product, a service, a person) so just shooting what's there hardly ever is adequate to accomplish the task. So, it is likely that you should plan to light the "set" entirely with your own lights to CREATE a "look"/mood in order to best "sell" whatever it is your client is trying to sell.
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#4 Josh Phoenix

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 10:12 PM

thank you for the replies. I did the shoot today and rented some Arris lights. I will post my results later this week.
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Metropolis Post

Visual Products

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CineLab

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

Opal

Tai Audio