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Digital Is Dead


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#1 Richard Boddington

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Posted 10 December 2010 - 03:54 PM

Well it's official.....Digital Is Dead. Clearly it was nothing more than a passing fancy, a fad it you will, as more and more producers choose film over the now dying digital acquisition mediums.

Here's the proof, from Kodak today:

"Many television producers still insist on shooting their programs on film as a way of differentiating quality content. In fact, the winners in the 2010 Emmy for Outstanding Drama, Television Movie, Commercial and Miniseries categories were all shot on Kodak Film! Mad Men won in the drama category for the third consecutive year. Temple Grandin earned seven Emmys, including Outstanding Television Movie. The Pacific led all programs, collecting a total of nine statuettes, including Outstanding Miniseries. In addition, Christian Sebalt won the Cinematography Emmy this year for shooting "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation" on Kodak 35mm film. And, the popular Old Spice commercial took home top honors in this year’s commercial category. Also, the most-nominated program in the Comedy category was Glee with 19 nominations."

Wow even Glee, the top rated show, is shot on film? Gee I thought all TV is now digital, at least that's what many members of this forum have claimed time and time again.

And this from FUJI, a list of major theatrical releases shot on film:

http://www.fujifilm....h_america/#h2-2

(I see just a few small theatrical releases are in there, Hereafter, Knight & Day, Black Swan, Wall Street, etc.)

Wow gee lot's of surprises in there, I thought every thing was shot on RED these days? I thought film died two years ago? This is quite a mystery, it appears that in fact digital is dead. I can only conclude that digital is dead because many people on here insist that every show shot on digital is proof that film is dead. So logically I assume that it works the other way around as well.

Oh well, bye, bye, digital it was nice working with you whilst we had the chance. You will now be assigned to the scrap heap of history.

I suggest that all owners of digital gear now do with the digital gear what digital owners have suggested we do with the film gear.....throw it all off a cliff, it's all worthless now.

R,
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#2 James Compton

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Posted 10 December 2010 - 04:12 PM

Fantastic! What a good laugh. That really made my day.
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#3 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 10 December 2010 - 04:50 PM

And here I just got rid of all my film equipment and was planning to buy digital-camera-industry stock. :o :angry: :D
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#4 Mate Marich

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Posted 10 December 2010 - 04:51 PM

Sorry for bad english :) .
This is your objective opinion. Your overreacting and there is nothing true in it ;) .
Neither one is dead. As long as the film is better media, and as long as the Digital is cheaper media there is no reason to burry any of them.
Price of film will kill him. Film is so expensive that people do very unreasible compromises just to avoid it. On the other hand digital is very perspective, as the sensors, processors and storage are faster and bigger every year.

Agein sorry for bad english :) .
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#5 Anton Papich

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Posted 10 December 2010 - 05:04 PM

Well, film is dying for, how much, 15 years now? :D I also agree, that there is nothing like film, and altough I shoot only analog photography, I'm not so sure that shooting film in cinematography would be my choice - only reason is price, nothing else. Film is better in my humble opinion in any way then digital.

Edited by Anton Papich, 10 December 2010 - 05:05 PM.

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#6 John Sprung

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Posted 10 December 2010 - 05:29 PM

What's happening here in TV land is that shows that started on film are staying on film. At the most recent post exec's dinner, it was thought quite remarkable that in the whole town, there was one new show starting on film. Nobody else expected there to be any. One major facility just tore out three or four telecine bays, and you can get a used Spirit for under $100K.




-- J.S.
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#7 Anton Papich

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Posted 10 December 2010 - 05:54 PM

What's happening here in TV land is that shows that started on film are staying on film. At the most recent post exec's dinner, it was thought quite remarkable that in the whole town, there was one new show starting on film. Nobody else expected there to be any. One major facility just tore out three or four telecine bays, and you can get a used Spirit for under $100K.


Which one?
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#8 Richard Boddington

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Posted 10 December 2010 - 05:57 PM

Sorry but my data is rock solid, Digital Is Dead.

I have shown that at least one movie or TV show is being shot on film, therefore every thing will be shot on film and digital is dead.

I don't want to hear any other opinion, mine is the only correct one.

Digital is finished as an acquisition medium, finished, finished, finished!!

R,
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#9 Keith Walters

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Posted 10 December 2010 - 07:50 PM

What's happening here in TV land is that shows that started on film are staying on film. At the most recent post exec's dinner, it was thought quite remarkable that in the whole town, there was one new show starting on film. Nobody else expected there to be any. One major facility just tore out three or four telecine bays, and you can get a used Spirit for under $100K.
-- J.S.

I can recall this happening at least twice before, in the late70s/early 80s and again in the early 90s. People eventually drifted back to film origination.
To me it's the height of irony that NOW, just as superb quality huge screen HDTVs are becoming available at ludicrously low prices (and dropping), everybody abandons film origination.
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#10 Justin Hayward

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Posted 10 December 2010 - 10:56 PM

Thank you Richard. As soon as I’m done typing this I’m throwing my laptop in the garbage too. Are people on this forum still debating whether or not digital is dead? You fossils need to get with the times.

kodakuser.net :P
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#11 Bruce Toscano

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Posted 11 December 2010 - 10:44 AM

My life changed today! I used to pray to the shrine of Terrance Malick, now I pray to the Shrine of Richard Boddington!
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#12 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 11 December 2010 - 10:59 AM

You just not picked up in Richardieism? God Bruce, we've been prostrating to a shrine of the lord boddington's prostate for years!
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#13 Anton Papich

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Posted 11 December 2010 - 03:09 PM

Sorry but my data is rock solid, Digital Is Dead.

I have shown that at least one movie or TV show is being shot on film, therefore every thing will be shot on film and digital is dead.

I don't want to hear any other opinion, mine is the only correct one.

Digital is finished as an acquisition medium, finished, finished, finished!!

R,


Hear, hear! :lol:

I must say, this is probably most common argument I see on forums or internet in general, when future of film is an issue, and your irony visualised it at its best.
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#14 Mark Williams

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Posted 11 December 2010 - 04:26 PM

Seriously I think there is a lot of truth to this. The digital cameras high end is becoming more and more affordable to the masses that professionals need a way to keep the masses out.. One way to do this is to make film the only acceptable format for professional use. I can see it now NEW Sony and Panasonic 50mm cameras the new high end for image quality. Cinema projector gates get an update. A file. No not a computer update a real file. Ultra 50mm
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#15 Phil Connolly

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Posted 11 December 2010 - 04:48 PM

Blimey Richard that's a bit premature - ever since film came out people have been pronouncing digital as dead or dying.

Sure over the next few years - digital's going to be used less and less, there's still a bit of life in it yet.

But I think there's going to be a place for digital over at least the next 10 years for high end projects and digital loving directors such as Chris Nolan and Spielberg.

As much as the film crowd try, they still can't get the look and feel of digital - I know with vision 3 kodak are getting close to nailing the digital look - but its still not there yet. The highlights on film are much too smooth - film just can't get that hard clipped hightlights the way Red does and the skin tones on film just aren't there yet - none of the skin tones are orange or dull enough.

I'm sure film will get there, but its not there yet - sick of these film fan boys who hang around on Panavision-user who overly hype the death of digital. Digital has a great history why rush to move on so soon - I'd be happy for film to take over digital but not until the quality and reliability are there.
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#16 Richard Boddington

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Posted 11 December 2010 - 05:27 PM

Very nicely written Phil. It's almost as if I've heard some of those arguments before, only in reverse. Hmmmmmmm?

R,
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#17 Thomas James

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Posted 11 December 2010 - 05:33 PM

As long as video shooters try to achieve the film look, video will become a dying format at least in spirit. However in the future when film shooters try to achieve the video look in order to create better motion fidelity, film shooters will then question why they have to bother with shooting film in the first place.
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#18 Keith Walters

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Posted 11 December 2010 - 05:40 PM

But I think there's going to be a place for digital over at least the next 10 years for high end projects and digital loving directors such as Chris Nolan and Spielberg.


Speilberg?!
You better wash your mouth out with hydroquinone.
Perhaps you're thinking of Mr "1440 x 800 is indistinguishable from film " Lucas :)
Steven Spielberg has never made a digital feature.
(It is easy to get the two mixed up, I'll admit. They tend to make the same sort of films, both are somewhat vertically challenged, and both have beards).
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#19 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 11 December 2010 - 06:22 PM

What's happening here in TV land is that shows that started on film are staying on film. At the most recent post exec's dinner, it was thought quite remarkable that in the whole town, there was one new show starting on film. Nobody else expected there to be any. One major facility just tore out three or four telecine bays, and you can get a used Spirit for under $100K.




-- J.S.


Some of the shows that started on film are going to digital too. Crash was S16 originally and then moved to D21, but then Dennis Hopper died, so that was that. In Plain Sight has also reportedly gone (or is going) to HD from S16, but I can't confirm that.
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#20 Richard Boddington

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Posted 11 December 2010 - 07:28 PM

Some of the shows that started on film are going to digital too. Crash was S16 originally and then moved to D21, but then Dennis Hopper died, so that was that. In Plain Sight has also reportedly gone (or is going) to HD from S16, but I can't confirm that.


Yeah but Glee is shot on 35mm, so that means all new shows will be 35mm. Sorry, Digital Is Dead!!!

R,
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