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Best Super 8 Film Editor?


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#1 Jeromy Darling

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Posted 11 December 2010 - 06:59 PM

any recommendations? Lots to choose from on ebay - any I should be looking for?
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#2 Bob Last

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Posted 11 December 2010 - 08:24 PM

any recommendations? Lots to choose from on ebay - any I should be looking for?


I'll go for Minette S5.
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#3 Mark Dunn

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Posted 12 December 2010 - 07:13 AM

Any one which is kind to the film and has an accessible gate for marking. Motorised if you can get it but in any case a nice easy transport so there's no tendency to skinch the roll when winding. A halogen bulb will be nice and bright.
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#4 Andries Molenaar

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Posted 12 December 2010 - 02:13 PM



Find an Elmo with a Non-Flicker prism.
Motordriven if you like, be sure the belts are OK.

Must it have sound, for old film?

Indeed it is best to install a halogen, with some effort you can find 6 Volt ones. Don't overdo the Watt as the transformer will not deliver that much more.


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#5 Bruce Taylor

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 07:34 PM

The Goko was also quite good, back in the day. I have a very nice one, bright, non flicker prism, motorized, sound capable. I think it may also have some recording features, but I always used my Elmo projector for that.
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#6 Martin Baumgarten

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Posted 18 December 2010 - 06:18 PM

Of all the Super 8 (& 8mm) editors, there are two main design types regarding the film placement. The BAIA corporation editor-viewers and all those made by BAIA under store brand names (Sears, Wards, K-Mart's Focal, Pennys etc) require the film to unravel from the Left side Supply in a counter-clockwise manner, thus the emulsion of the film is downward. They made cheap ones and some better large screen ones. If they are clean and work well, and you are careful, they'll do the job. Those large screens are nice and bright.

However, my recommendation is for the other design type, whereby the film unravels from the left Supply side reel in a clockwise direction, just as it does from the projector.....so the emulsion is in the up position. Editors made in this manner are the numerous ones from GOKO Japan, which also made them for HAHNEL, ERNO, ELMO, SEARS, and many others. They will have a similar if not exact appearance to their GOKO counterparts (since they are made by GOKO), and will also have the "NF System" moniker....referring to the polygon prism method (versus the 2 or 4 sided prisms of virtually all previous editors which have considerable flicker. The GOKO units are nice, easy to use, and use their polygon 16 facet prism (NF system). They did make a couple smaller ones that use a 12 facet prism, and while that alone is not a problem, the sprocket drive used puts too much torque on the film and prism rotation mechanism. These are easy to tell, since they have a film sprocket visible just before the film gate. Whereby the other design has the film move over the filmgate, and the sprocket is a large diameter one incorporated on the side of the polygon prism. This design with the large sprocket on the prism side causes virtually no torque on the film sprocket holes, and allows for very easy transport.

GOKO also made both manual and motorized editors. Most allow attachment of a sound reproducer to which you can listen to the sound track via earphone or headphone. However using a manual crank or basic motorized unit will cause uneven sound reproduction. The main goal here was to be able to find a synch or editing spot to know where to cut the film so that there is the best tradeoff for picture and sound editing on single-system sound films. GOKO's high end machines, their 8008 and 3008 units allow for sound recording as well, since they are capstan run units with stable recording quality at both 18fps or 24fps, with the higher model allowing recording on both tracks and also in Stereophonic sound. GOKO made a capstan run editor for ELMO which is a nice machine but without recording capability. These are all very gentle on film.

Other well made machines that are somewhat less easier to locate are: BAUER, BRAUN (Nizo), and the well made metal bodied MINETTE. The MINETTE was made in both stand alone units with film reel arms, or as a free standing viewer only requiring separate film reel arms mounted onto a baseboard. Lastly, while there were many other units made by other makers such as Chinon, the older well made metal units made by CRAIG-KALART in the USA if clean and in good condition will work fine also.

Hope this helps you out some.
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#7 Jeromy Darling

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Posted 21 December 2010 - 04:02 PM

wow, fantastic help guys. Holy smoke.

This is what's on ebay right now
This is what's on Craigslist right now
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