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I need help shooting Kodachrome


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#1 Jared Foster

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Posted 14 December 2010 - 01:46 PM

I have the Canon 1014 Electronic Super 8 camera that I got on ebay. I got some expired Kodachrome (1991) film that I want to shoot right away before the deadline but I have a few questions. From what I read and understand the kodachrome film needs the 85A filter to properly expose color in daylight. I plan to shoot all my scenes in daylight. But the camera (Canon 1014 Electronic) says it has a default internal CCA filter. It is not a simple switch to daylight or indoor light switch. I guess by default the CCA filter is always on and if I want to shoot indoor I need to either add a video light to the camera that will turn the CCA filter off or use a plug into the camera hole. So do I need a 85A filter on the front of my camera shoot in daylight? I have already shot 3 rolls with a 85a filter on the front of the lens plus I assume the default CCA filter is also on. What is my film going to look like if I get any exposure? How do I properly shoot Kodachrome with my camera in daylight? I still have 3 rolls to get this right before the deadline.

Thank You!
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#2 Mark Dunn

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Posted 14 December 2010 - 03:00 PM

All Super 8 cameras, more or less, have the internal 85A filter and K40 does require it. A daylight-balanced cartridge would push it out of the way automatically- that's what the notch below the gate is for, it leaves that push button where it is so the filter stays in. You don't add another. If you have, the film will be very warm in tone assuming the TTL meter gets the exposure right through the 85A. It's a significant overcorrection and I don't know if it is correctable in telecine.
Assuming the footage is repeatable, I'd be tempted to reshoot, ditch the faulty stuff and save the cost of processing.
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#3 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 15 December 2010 - 02:19 AM

All Super 8 cameras, more or less, have the internal 85A filter and K40 does require it. A daylight-balanced cartridge would push it out of the way automatically- that's what the notch below the gate is for, it leaves that push button where it is so the filter stays in. You don't add another. If you have, the film will be very warm in tone assuming the TTL meter gets the exposure right through the 85A. It's a significant overcorrection and I don't know if it is correctable in telecine.
Assuming the footage is repeatable, I'd be tempted to reshoot, ditch the faulty stuff and save the cost of processing.


Who knows what a double filtration will actually do, especially if the film was exposed properly. The film is 19 years out of date and I think it would be fun just to see what actually happened.

If shooting indoors and if you want to remove the filter, you might find that a quarter fits in the slot and will work. Some cameras slots would allow a quarter to be used, but not all. I don't know if the canon has the proper slit or not to fit a quarter.

If you have enough light, the filter color can probably be removed in post. I think its easier to remove color from film than change a too blue film, especially if the blue is on people's faces.
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#4 Mark Dunn

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Posted 15 December 2010 - 04:38 AM

On balance, I agree. I was being a bit technocratic.
For the smallish amount of money involved, go for it. But don't double-filter the rest!
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#5 Miguel Loredo

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Posted 15 December 2010 - 05:20 AM

You need urgently the manual of your camera! For the K40 aoutdoors, just insert the cartidge and shoot. It will do automatically.
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#6 Jared Foster

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Posted 15 December 2010 - 02:21 PM

I will get the film back around Christmas time and I will let you know what it looks like and hopefully I can also post a link of the footage. Thanks for the help.
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#7 Maurizio Di Cintio

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Posted 17 December 2010 - 08:37 AM

I'm sorry but I know this camera fairly well and I am a bit confused.

If you want to shoot K40 outdoors, put the switch on the right-hand side of the camera on the sun symbol: this will engage the internal conversion filter, converting tungsten-balanced film to day light. If you want to shoot indoors (with tungsten lights), put the switch on the bulb symbol: this will disengage the filter.

I shot K40 as old as 13 years. If you have always kept it refrigerated (in the freezeer preferably) it should turn out well, Speed may be am issue though for stock so old; perhaps you should overexpose by a stop or so.

Good luck
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#8 Oliver Christoph Kochs

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Posted 17 December 2010 - 09:08 AM

Hello,
i'm pretty sure you double filtered this. You can do all filtering and exposure manually when you tape the notches on the cartridge. See HERE for a printed version of the notch ruler for the s8 carts.
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