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student in neeed of advice


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#1 bogdanovici barbu

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Posted 23 December 2010 - 03:15 PM

guys, I am about to shoot a POV of an old man that is awakened by the burst of light coming through the windows. I will be shooting it with a 7D. Now, the effect I am interested in achieving [in camera], is the old man's blinking to the strong light that hits his eyes(camera) with blurs and all..
I am yet to test a tilt/shift lens which I think will help me with the blurs, but still have no idea on how to trick the eye blink.
I am trying to get as close to this as possible :
first 30 or so seconds

Thank you, Bogdan
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#2 Jeremy M Lundborg

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Posted 23 December 2010 - 03:40 PM

My recommendation at this level, especially with a 7D, is to utilize a Lens Baby.
I'm not sure about the best place to purchase or rent in your area, maybe a few phone calls and some research will get you there.

The blinking effect may be best done in post with some trickery in editing. That's something you can easily test yourself with even the camera on any contemporary phone and a rudimentary editing program.

Your reference is some amalgam of various imagery, but the main contingent is the film "The Diving Bell And The Butterfly" by Julian Schnabel. I'd recommend watching it if you haven't, great film, but also researching the technical aspects of how those shots were done. I'm sure Kaminski's work on the film can be described by someone else here...
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#3 bogdanovici barbu

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Posted 23 December 2010 - 06:19 PM

a friend told me that it's bettet to use T/S lens than a lens baby though I'm not aware of him having any experience with either. I think it's best to test them both.
I know about the film and am a big fan of Kaminski's work, but I haven't been able to get any solid info regarding his work on those shots; what I do know it that he used T/S lenses..

I know the effect can be achieved in post, but I really want to do it myself.
Thank you for the swift reply, Jeremy.

!f anyone else knows something, do reply.. tank you !
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#4 Chris Millar

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Posted 23 December 2010 - 07:01 PM

Lens baby definitely instead of a tilt/shift, and screw post :lol: - much more 'organic' (heh heh, I know the term is overused, but its appropriate in this sense)...

A tilt shift lens just wouldn't be able to be moved around fast enough and will have a distinct linearity to its movements, not to mention he cost. In the absence of a lens baby, just make one by holding a lens in front of the camera then tape some black material around the back, thats all they are anyway - a little spill/flare will work in your favour also... As you're focused closely anyway try focusing the lens itself further away then holding it away from the camera, large format style - you'll get a light drop (which will be easy to adjust with the digital camera) but it'll that will give you more room to move the lens around without crunching the mounts

For the blink just two black cards hinged if you like.

I see a heap of people around that camera!

Sounds like fun - experimentation is this case is pretty cheap
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