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25 year old 7291 16mm - Verdict?


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#1 Phil Thompson

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 08:21 PM

I've just purchased a load of 25 year old 7291 16mm. Still boxed. Do you think It will still be useable? Obviously im not after perfect color reproduction. But do you think the film could be fogged too much?
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#2 Mike Lary

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 11:14 PM

I've just purchased a load of 25 year old 7291 16mm. Still boxed. Do you think It will still be useable? Obviously im not after perfect color reproduction. But do you think the film could be fogged too much?


I would have a snip test done. Otherwise, you're just guessing.
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#3 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 03:31 PM

Even if stored in a freezer all that time, it will have very high fog level due to cosmic radiation. Extremely unlikely to be still useable.
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#4 Kurt August

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 05:14 PM

Last summer Dejonghe transfered some comparable stock for me. Most of the dynamic range was indeed eaten up by fog. Some shots came out quite nice in my opinion. Like badly faded slide film. Others were just bad in any way.

It was fun to see and do, but is has no practical use whatsoever. It also very unpredictable.

Can you resist trying?
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#5 Matt Parr

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Posted 16 July 2011 - 04:33 AM

Did you end up trying it out? If so, how were the results?
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#6 Daniel Lee

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Posted 18 July 2011 - 02:42 AM

It might actually be okay, being only 100 speed.

I had 19 year old EXR 50D that was great (due to it's low speed).

Shoot it at 50 and get a stop pull I would reckon (after testing) if you haven't done so after all this time.


I've found a way to remove fog on colour film, but it's a DIY job, you'd need a tank big enough to load it in first. I've only experimented on it at still lengths.

Edited by Daniel Lee, 18 July 2011 - 02:42 AM.

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#7 John Sprung

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Posted 18 July 2011 - 01:34 PM

It's ideal scratch test stock for a lab. Other than that, it has no value.




-- J.S.
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#8 Phil Thompson

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 03:06 AM

shot it on sat, weird color shift, blue fogging, noisy.. annoying. use old stock if u just dont care and wanted wacky mucky vibes. i wont skimp on stock next time.

brand spanking 50d vibes for me.
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#9 Marc Roessler

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Posted 06 August 2011 - 07:14 PM

Daniel, can you tell us a bit more about the special "fog removal" process? Are there any other effects on the film when doing this?

Thanks,
Marc
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