Jump to content


Photo

Speed ramp in camera, or in post?


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Karel Bata

Karel Bata
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 487 posts
  • Director
  • London - a rather posh bit

Posted 06 January 2011 - 07:10 PM

Call me old skool, but I always thought it looked better done in camera, however today I talked to a very experienced cameraman who said he couldn't see the difference. You'll understand if I won't say who it was.

Thoughts?
  • 0

#2 John Sprung

John Sprung
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4635 posts
  • Other

Posted 06 January 2011 - 08:59 PM

It's better to do it in camera. Arri's Relativity might be the best way to do it in post, but it's expensive. If you want to do it in post, shoot the highest frame rate and largest shutter angle you can afford.




-- J.S.
  • 0

#3 Mitch Gross

Mitch Gross
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2873 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 07 January 2011 - 11:15 AM

It can be very difficult to get the timing just right in camera. And some cameras cannot shift speed as quickly as you might like or on a linear or non linear accelleration/decelleration curve as you might wish. That's why post control is so nice.
  • 0

#4 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11938 posts
  • Other

Posted 07 January 2011 - 11:30 AM

Having done quite a lot of this sort of thing with Twixtor I can only agree with Mr Gross. Given the motion of an actor, there is somehow a very tightly defined moment at which speed should change, and a characteristic with which it should change, in order to look somehow nice. I am surprised that anyone ever got this exactly right in camera, especially on film.

I wonder how the desktop software plugins compare to Relativity.

In either case my default assumption would be to shoot it all at the highest frame rate you can feasibly achieve, and do the ramp in software. Definitely shoot tests, as the software can be picky about what works and what doesn't, especially if you can't shoot at a frame rate as slow as your slowest intended output speed - which is unfortunately common.

P

PS - Kaboom -
  • 0

#5 Mitch Gross

Mitch Gross
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2873 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 07 January 2011 - 11:34 AM

BTW, with the advent of digital high speed cameras like the Phantom HD Gold, I don't say to shoot at the top frame rate of the expected finished shot. Instead I suggest shooting at twice that speed. This allows more options in the speed at which the ramping will occur without having to generate too many interpolated frames.
  • 0


Visual Products

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets

Opal

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

The Slider

Opal

CineTape

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc