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#1 Courtney Parks

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 11:57 PM

Hello. My name is Courtney Parks and I am currently a junior in high school. For several years now, I have been interested in film and just the entertainment industry in general. I don't know where to get started and so I came to these forums for help from those who have a lot more experience in the industry.

1) How hard is it to make it into the film industry? I've been googling this question for awhile now and the collective answers I have been getting has been so skewed it isn't even funny. Some say that finding a job is really hard once you graduate from college. Others say that it is as hard as you make it. One person even said "If you don't have a relative that is already in the industry, give up now". This really doesn't give me much hope.

2) How hard is it to stay afloat in this industry? I have heard that the film industry is one of the most unstable ever. You can do a project, and then be out of work for months. While I'm not looking to become rich or anything, I really would like to be able to support myself. I wouldn't want to go to bed wondering if I'll have enough money to pay the bills.

3) Getting a job? I would have put this in question 1, but it didn't seem to fit for me. Anyways, from most people, I've heard that once you graduate college, you should generally try to get internships or jobs on small films so you can gain experience so you can show people what you can do. You'll progressively get bigger and bigger jobs until finally one day, you'd have a stable job. I'm most definitely willing to put the work in but how long would you say it would take? Actually, I guess the question would be would you recommend getting a second job while you wait to get bigger and bigger products?

4) I'm interested in becoming "the guy that holds the camera". The reason I say it like that is because "cinematographer, videographer, and director of photography" seem to imply the same job yet mean different things. Can anyone explain to me what the difference between these are? If someone were to ask me what I want to go to college for, I would be scared to tell them because I wouldn't know if I were saying the right thing.

5) How would I go about becoming "the guy that holds the camera"? I live in Georgia and would be interested in going to the University of Texas or the University of Florida. But... in my tenth grade year of high school, I goofed off and my GPA suffered. Now I don't think I'll be able to get into those (maybe UT since they don't look at your GPA) but what would be my backup plan for the film industry? Is the college you choose that important?

4)
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#2 John Young

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 09:26 AM

As far as I know, there are two schools of thought:

You do not need to go to film school to be in the industry, AND, film school is good for networking.

Since I don't work in the 'industry' (i.e. Hollywood), I can't say what it takes to get there. But, from what I have read of the experience of others, Production Assistant is usually where most people start.

There are more people that have more better advice than I.
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#3 Richard Boddington

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 02:20 PM

I wouldn't want to go to bed wondering if I'll have enough money to pay the bills.


Then walk away now. Sorry, we won't be helping you by lying to you. Again, sorry.

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#4 Bruce Greene

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 03:18 PM

Hello. My name is Courtney Parks and I am currently a junior in high school. For several years now, I have been interested in film and just the entertainment industry in general. I don't know where to get started and so I came to these forums for help from those who have a lot more experience in the industry.

1) How hard is it to make it into the film industry? I've been googling this question for awhile now and the collective answers I have been getting has been so skewed it isn't even funny. Some say that finding a job is really hard once you graduate from college. Others say that it is as hard as you make it. One person even said "If you don't have a relative that is already in the industry, give up now". This really doesn't give me much hope.

2) How hard is it to stay afloat in this industry? I have heard that the film industry is one of the most unstable ever. You can do a project, and then be out of work for months. While I'm not looking to become rich or anything, I really would like to be able to support myself. I wouldn't want to go to bed wondering if I'll have enough money to pay the bills.

3) Getting a job? I would have put this in question 1, but it didn't seem to fit for me. Anyways, from most people, I've heard that once you graduate college, you should generally try to get internships or jobs on small films so you can gain experience so you can show people what you can do. You'll progressively get bigger and bigger jobs until finally one day, you'd have a stable job. I'm most definitely willing to put the work in but how long would you say it would take? Actually, I guess the question would be would you recommend getting a second job while you wait to get bigger and bigger products?

4) I'm interested in becoming "the guy that holds the camera". The reason I say it like that is because "cinematographer, videographer, and director of photography" seem to imply the same job yet mean different things. Can anyone explain to me what the difference between these are? If someone were to ask me what I want to go to college for, I would be scared to tell them because I wouldn't know if I were saying the right thing.

5) How would I go about becoming "the guy that holds the camera"? I live in Georgia and would be interested in going to the University of Texas or the University of Florida. But... in my tenth grade year of high school, I goofed off and my GPA suffered. Now I don't think I'll be able to get into those (maybe UT since they don't look at your GPA) but what would be my backup plan for the film industry? Is the college you choose that important?

4)


Hi,

I heard all the same advice before I began my career as "The guy that holds the camera". I've been doing it now for almost 30 years. Sometimes making a very good living, sometimes not.

If you need stability of employment, this might not be the career for you. But then again, many other careers these days are not stable. Even teachers have been laid off in the recent downturn.

Since almost all camera work is freelance, you will become a professional job hunter. Imagine being laid off after 20 years at the bank. It would seem like your life is over! But after 20 years of the "biz" you will have been laid off hundreds of times, and have the skill and thick skin to deal with it.

I don't know what real advice I can give you, but when I graduated from college with a degree in Economics, I had no real skills that would gain me any meaningful employment. I realized that I would have to start at the bottom of any career that I chose. And that meant I could pick any career to start at the bottom of:)

So, if you really want to be a cinematographer, why not start at the bottom. Some make it, some don't but that's the way it is in most careers, especially popular ones.

Best of luck to you!
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#5 Courtney Parks

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 08:43 PM

To be honest, not being able to pay bills is fine for me. I'd just get another job. But I just have a fear of failure you know. I wouldn't mind getting a job and working for experience and such, but, how hard is it?
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#6 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 09:53 PM

Hello. My name is Courtney Parks and I am currently a junior in high school. For several years now, I have been interested in film and just the entertainment industry in general. I don't know where to get started and so I came to these forums for help from those who have a lot more experience in the industry.


It's good that you're starting early asking these questions... BEFORE you commit to a filmschool or some other route. Thumbs up! B)

1) How hard is it to make it into the film industry? I've been googling this question for awhile now and the collective answers I have been getting has been so skewed it isn't even funny. Some say that finding a job is really hard once you graduate from college. Others say that it is as hard as you make it. One person even said "If you don't have a relative that is already in the industry, give up now". This really doesn't give me much hope.


How "hard" it is depends on a lot of things... like who you know, what you can do already, who knows YOU, the overall economy, WHERE production is taking place, how MUCH production is taking place, your personality....

Also, WHAT you SPECIFICALLY want to do can have a lot to do with it. I see below that you are interested in camera, so I'll address the specifics of that later. But in general, apart from things you can't control (like the economy, where production happens, etc.), there are things you CAN do in order to improve your own chances. Number one is what you're doing here: find out REAL information from working professionals who have been through it and are making a living in the industry. You'll find that almost everyone is willing to help newcomers when they illustrate a real interest and enthusiasm and desire. There is a lot of "noise" out there (as you've found out) that you'll have to filter out to find the most useful information. There are a lot of books, schools, DVDs, etc. that are merely selling the dream (Hollywood 101!) that somehow manage to teach an aspiring "filmmaker" how to make a movie within 250 pages! <_< I've got some recommendations (reading list) that I'll share at the end that will help you understand the business better so that you are able to make wise choices as you work to build opportunities.

A BIG part of the "get into the business" thing is that it can take time as you build relationships and establish yourself. This might mean having to work for little to no money at first, for a while...which means that in order to be able to do that means not HAVING TO work for money. Keep your financial overhead LOW so that you are free to take ANY opportunity that arise even if it means earning no income for a few weeks. If you have too much debt of too many bills, you'll find that you have to take a job outside of the business which is not where you want to be.

And your personality and work ethic count for a lot. Production days are long and an entire project can last weeks and months. Those who would hire you have to know that at the very least, they won't have personality conflicts with you. Especially when you're just starting out, even if you are working for no money, people will remember your attitude during those long days, during those tedious night shoots, when things aren't going well. Be pleasant and nice no matter what is going on. This is very important.


2) How hard is it to stay afloat in this industry? I have heard that the film industry is one of the most unstable ever. You can do a project, and then be out of work for months. While I'm not looking to become rich or anything, I really would like to be able to support myself. I wouldn't want to go to bed wondering if I'll have enough money to pay the bills.


Everything you've heard is true. If you are working on a movie today, it very well could be your last day. But, having said that, once you've been working in the business for a while and are getting regular or semi-regular calls, you don't have to have daily anxiety about getting work.

But, as I said above, keeping your overhead low when you aren't confident yet about getting consistent work will be to your advantage for a lot of practical tangible reasons and for the emotional ones.


3) Getting a job? I would have put this in question 1, but it didn't seem to fit for me. Anyways, from most people, I've heard that once you graduate college, you should generally try to get internships or jobs on small films so you can gain experience so you can show people what you can do. You'll progressively get bigger and bigger jobs until finally one day, you'd have a stable job. I'm most definitely willing to put the work in but how long would you say it would take? Actually, I guess the question would be would you recommend getting a second job while you wait to get bigger and bigger products?


No, you want to stay available as opportunities arise. Which goes back to setting your financial situation up so that you don't have to work...as much as possible, anyway. But your description of the "how to get a job" is pretty accurate.

How long can this process take? There's no telling really. It could be a few weeks, if you just happen to meet the right people at the right place at the right time. Or it could take months or years as you keep at it until you meet the right people who can take you into steady-ish employment. A lot of getting steady work relies on the group of people you happen to fall in with. Some circles of people seem to work all the time. Other circles are more sporadic. Anyone who works less than that usually doesn't last and bails from the industry.



4) I'm interested in becoming "the guy that holds the camera". The reason I say it like that is because "cinematographer, videographer, and director of photography" seem to imply the same job yet mean different things. Can anyone explain to me what the difference between these are? If someone were to ask me what I want to go to college for, I would be scared to tell them because I wouldn't know if I were saying the right thing.


Titles are a tricky thing and you'll get lots of differing opinions regarding who "deserves" which title. I'll do my best to stay as objective as possible even though I have my own opinions about it. :)

A Director of Photography is a title generally given to a "cameraman" who works on feature/narrative films, television shows, commercials, or music videos. The DP is DIRECTING a crew of people and isn't necessarily working as a Camera OPERATOR (holding the camera). Not always, but usually a DP has to DIRECT the photography for multiple cameras and the lighting "look" for a variety of scenes, locations, sets, environments. This title can and does include FILM projects as well as those that are acquired electronically (videotape, harddrives)


Videographer is a cameraman who primarily acquires images electronically, not using film. This isn't to say that this person CAN'T or doesn't have the ability to shoot film, it just means that he doesn't usually do it for a living. The work a Videographer does is USUALLY not narrative, but can encompass a wide range of areas, like sporting events, marketing (interviews), reality TV, talk shows, entertainment tabloid shows, documentaries, news gathering.

Cinematographer is mostly associated with cameramen who shoot film, but not necessarily narrative work. Sort of more documentary one-camera style (like a Videographer) but using film.




5) How would I go about becoming "the guy that holds the camera"? I live in Georgia and would be interested in going to the University of Texas or the University of Florida. But... in my tenth grade year of high school, I goofed off and my GPA suffered. Now I don't think I'll be able to get into those (maybe UT since they don't look at your GPA) but what would be my backup plan for the film industry? Is the college you choose that important?


No, NO filmschool or any school is necessarily important to build a career as a Cameraman. NOBODY is going to ask you for your diploma or ask where you went to school. You'll get hired based on what you are capable of, so, if you wish to be hired as a DP, then you have to prove to others that you can do it. That means having a reel that shows your work AND a variety of work that shows that you are capable of doing different things.

To that end, school CAN be beneficial in that it can give you access to equipment and a "safe" formal environment in which to learn. Many people go to filmschool to become Directors, so opportunities to shoot student films may be more for an aspiring Cameraman. You can also meet like-minded people who may or may not help you build a career once you graduate. As with everything, there are no guarantees so don't go to a filmschool thinking that it will give you a career.

Also, higher education in general can help you in more ways than seem obvious. In particular for a Cameraman, studying subjects OTHER THAN filmmaking can be VERY beneficial. Studying art and art history will give you a perspective to framing and lighting that you won't necessarily get by just watching other movies. Studying history will give you perspective on what various time periods should "feel" like so that when you light a movie, your work will be more "authentic." Studying communications (interpersonal) will help you COMMUNICATE better...and this may be one of the most important things you can learn. A great deal of what you do in the "movie business" is communicating with others... ideas, requests... and interpreting what others are trying to say to you. If you can't communicate your ideas well, then things won't happen. Based on your post here, you likely won't have much problem in this area, but learning various communication techniques can help as you cross paths with a variety of personalities.


I HIGHLY recommend that you take a look at the following list of resources that WILL answer a lot of the questions you have and many that you might not have even thought to ask:


What I Really Want to Do On Set in Hollywood: A Guide to Real Jobs in the Film Industry [Paperback]
Brian Dzyak (Author) http://www.amazon.co...94799861&sr=8-1 - yes, this is a book that I wrote. I wrote it SPECIFICALLY for people like you primarily because I WAS someone like you. When I was just beginning to think about all of this in High School way back when, we didn't have the internet and there were no books out there to answer the questions I had. I had been in the business for a few years and there still was nothing and I was getting questions just like yours from people like you. I looked around and there was STILL no resource out there to help people like us. So I sat down and began writing. I PROMISE that the book will help you understand the arena you want to get into. So, even if you just read it at the bookstore, I recommend chapters one through five and then the ENTIRE Camera Department section AND the chapters on the Grip and Electric Departments. As an aspiring DP, you should read the entire thing as you WILL work with just about EVERYONE in one way another at some point, so understanding what they do will help YOU do YOUR job that much better.


The Film Producer: An Industry Veteran Reveals What It Takes to Be a Producer in Today's Hollywood [Paperback]
Paul N. Lazarus (Author) http://www.amazon.co...94800204&sr=1-2 - What? A book on Producing? Why would you want that? This will give you a finer understanding of what it takes to get a movie project STARTED and what it takes to get it done from the Producer's point of view. As your career depends on getting jobs, knowing more about why some movies get made while other don't... as well as why they are made in some locations and not in others... will help you to MAKE opportunities for yourself instead of just waiting for them to come to you.


www.wordplayer.com - This is primarily a website for Screenwriters, but like the book above, it will help you to understand what it takes to get projects off the ground. AND understanding the elements of STORY is vital as YOU (the DP) are helping to tell a story with pictures... framing, lighting, camera movement... You don't have to know how to write a script, but you do need to know the elements of story and Wordplayer is an excellent place to learn.


I also will point you at www.realfilmcareer.com. The front page has current industry news that will help you to keep up with where the work is and why it's there. The forums section is FULL of additional resources that may help you build and maintain a career.


Good luck! Keep up the enthusiasm and we'll all be working for you one day. :)
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#7 Richard Boddington

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 12:24 AM

What I Really Want to Do On Set in Hollywood: A Guide to Real Jobs in the Film Industry [Paperback]
Brian Dzyak (Author) http://www.amazon.co...94799861&sr=8-1


Damn it! I forgot to post this first, again!!

R,
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#8 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 01:21 AM

Damn it! I forgot to post this first, again!!

R,


I didn't want to wake you. ;)
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#9 Paco Sweetman

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 10:21 AM

Hey Courtney, I thought I would throw my 2 cents in to this one. But, I'll be honest, I'm not a cinematographer. I'm an editor by profession. I like shooting celluloid in my spare time.

I have been in your shoes though. When I was in school I loved films and TV but never thought I'm competitive enough or whatever to get a job in the industry. I did a two year media course, and realised that I loved working in film / TV that I went to do a degree in film production.

You said in one of your postings that you weren't afraid to be out of work but just to fail. What you need to understand is that failure is a part of the process. It's not mathematics. There is no one way to do anything in this industry.
There is only your interpretation. How you shoot a scene, or edit a scene or direct a scene, is your way. I think if you don't fail occasionally then you aren't pushing yourself hard enough. Be it underexposing some shots, to making poor shot choices; you name it.

I found going to film school a great place to try out new things, to succeed and at times fail because I was too inexperienced or just reached a little bit too far. Most of my best friends in the world I met there. And on those rainy days when your film shoot's gone crap or the edit isn't working out, they are there to help you and give you honest advice.

If you want to be a cinematographer, then you can either got to a film school or you can try and apprentice yourself to a DP and learn from them. I think it's total B.S. that you have to have a family member that works in the industry. My whole family work in either construction or law, so I get dubbed 'the arty type'!

If you choose this profession and you like it, one thing I would say, (and it's a positive in my opinion) It's not a 9-5 job. It's infuses itself with your whole life, the way you see things and the way you interpret things. It's not always roses, but it can be immensely rewarding and fulfilling. It can be come a complete passion.
Just look at all the full time filmmakers online here that spend so much time posting answering questions and sharing info.

Good Luck.

Paco
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#10 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 13 January 2011 - 04:06 AM

Cortney, any job everyone wants to do is gonna be competitive so figure you're gonna do a lot free work. IF you act like a professional even on jobs you're not getting paid for, you WILL get a reputation as a professional and will act like a professional when you do get paid work which will translate to more paid work. You've got some time before you enter the workforce so here's what I'd recommend. First of all, cinematography is NOT a glamorous job, it is a hell of a lot of work so you better love to do it.

You're gonna start on the lowest rung of the latter which is probably as a Production Assistant or P.A. with any luck, it will be a P.A. for the camera department and you will work in that capacity for a few years. IF you work hard, do your job well, keep a good attitude even when your superiors are being total asses and completely unfair, you will maybe move up to 2nd Camera Assistant (clapper/loader or 2nd AC) then after a few more years again, after showing complete professionalism and self control, you move on to 1st Camera Assistant (Focus Puller or 1st AC) now as a 1st, there may be occasion on smaller productions where you will be asked to operate the second unit camera which will give you some experience. You may also have a chance as an experienced 1st to work as cameraman on small indy productions which will give you footage to build your reel which is a reel of film (DVD) of your work which you can submit to production companies who are planning projects. If they like your work, they will call you in for an interview and if you show the same professionalism you have been cultivating, they may even hire you. You again work hard, learn more and do good work, you get more work and in a few years, you begin to develop a reputation as a reliable, competent professional cameraman and you start to get bigger movies and MAYBE some of those producers, DOPs or stars you've impressed over the years get a really big film and want you to work with them on it and your status changes to A list.

I would get an inexpensive camera package if I were you. Ideally a 35mm package (Short ends of 35mm film regularly sell for 5 to 10 cents a foot, processing runs about 10 cents a foot and transfer to digital 6 cents a foot or printing 1 light, best light about 15 cents a foot, you can also find small medical 35mm monitor which can be used to edit as well as occasionally a 35mm tabletop editor for a few hundred bucks and portable 35mm projectors can still be had as decent price) like a Konvas 1M (because they are plentiful, small, simple, reliable, usually come with a set of lenses and can be had for as little as 400 bucks.), a Eyemo (6 to 8 hundred) or maybe an Arri 2 (8 to 15 hundred).


OR a 16mm package which have dropped radically in price in the last few months. There are a lot of these. The Bolex REX, the Arri, Canon Scopic, Filmo, Kinor 16mm, Beaulieu R16, Krasnogorsk-3 (good little camera, can be had for as little as 200 bucks)There are tons of table top editors and projectors out there cheap although surprisingly short ends are more expensive than 35mm because 16mm is used less often now a days although it takes less footage for the same running time in 16mm than in 35mm so it kinda evens out. Processing is about the same per foot and printing is a bit more expensive but again, you're using less film for the same running time.

OOORRRR super 8mm which is the least expensive but pretty much an amateur format although Spielberg learned one hell of a lot shooting on one as a kid. The GOOD s8mm cameras are Bauer(Nizo), Beaulieu, Bolex which run about 200 to 500 bucks even up to a grand but most S8 can be had for under a hundred. Although much of the time footage is just transferred to disc, editors and projectors are around a hundred or so each, so everything to shoot edit and project might run 2 to 3 hundred and add a old school analog light meter for about 20 or 40 bucks, some bead board and aluminum foil taped to a piece of cardboard (dull side out) and maybe a couple of worklights.

OOOOOORRRRRRR if you have no money at all, get your parents video camera and start shooting. You can still probably pick up some bead board, Styrofoam and maybe use some desk lamps or re-arrange house lamps, change bulbs ect to create lighting effects. See if you really like being the guy that holds the camera. I decided I wanted to be an actor at 15. For you, I'd say try it out and see if it's really what you want to do with your life because it is very competitivee and there is no guarantee. B)
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#11 Courtney Parks

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Posted 16 January 2011 - 08:24 PM

At the moment, getting a camera would not be an option. I probably wouldn't be able to get one until I become a senior in high school (it would require a job and getting one right now isn't a real option since we have ALL of our tests this year). While I'm thinking about it though, can anyone tell me about some of the other careers in the film industry? I was thinking about becoming an editor or an Special FX guy (I practice around with Sony Vegas). Could you guys tell me about these careers?

Also, would you recommend I take other courses in college just to be better rounded or just take film classes and only film classes.
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#12 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 16 January 2011 - 09:53 PM

At the moment, getting a camera would not be an option. I probably wouldn't be able to get one until I become a senior in high school (it would require a job and getting one right now isn't a real option since we have ALL of our tests this year). While I'm thinking about it though, can anyone tell me about some of the other careers in the film industry? I was thinking about becoming an editor or an Special FX guy (I practice around with Sony Vegas). Could you guys tell me about these careers?

Also, would you recommend I take other courses in college just to be better rounded or just take film classes and only film classes.




[excerpt from "What I Really Want to Do: On Set in Hollywood"]


What the heck is Special Effects?
The entire world of filmmaking revolves around creating many different illusions to make up one large fantasy world. In nearly every shot, the Production Designer creates brand new environments or enhances existing locations that are too difficult to shoot as is. The Director of Photography creates or enhances the light to create a mood or specific look. Actors pretend to be characters who only previously existed within the mind of a Writer and on the page. Except in documentary or news work, anything you see on a movie or television screen is really just an illusion.

But when it comes to creating real “magic,” filmmakers call upon the Special Effects (SFX) Department. Just like illusionists on a stage, Special Effects technicians are there to create “tricks” that, when put on film, appear to be completely natural and real. You’re there to make the audience believe in something that isn’t really happening. The moment the audience becomes aware that a special effect was utilized is the moment that the work has failed.

Special Effects fundamentally covers the basic elements of wind, fire, rain, and snow, but they do much more than that. Really anything natural or unnatural that can be achieved “practically” on set via a mechanical or pyrotechnic process falls under the purview of Special Effects. Very often, you’ll be fabricating parts and mechanisms from scratch. Even something as seemingly simple as a kitchen sink on a studio-backlot set requires someone to build the external hardware (Construction Department and Set Dressing) and then someone else to provide the water that comes out and a place for it to go to. Special Effects arrives with the water tank, the plumbing, and the pumps necessary to make it all work; then the department hooks it all up. Something that you’d otherwise take for granted, such as running water on a set, is just as “special” of an effect as the grandest of explosions.


I thought they just used computers for everything now.
It is important to note the difference between Special Effects and Visual Effects. Special Effects creates practical illusions that actually occur on set, such as wind (with fans), rain (with water trucks and rain bars), snow (with foam and blowers), and fire (with flame bars or explosives). Visual Effects takes the film that is shot on set and enhances it later on with computers or optical processes. For instance, anything that is shot against a green screen or anything that is created wholly within the computer, is considered a Visual Effect and requires a very different career path, one in which the work will be completed off-set.

This isn’t to say that you don’t need to or shouldn’t know how to use computers in the Special Effects Department. Gimbals, large hydraulic platforms used to move vehicles or entire sets, require the use of computer controls. Rain bars, explosive charges, and squib hits may require a computer to make them work correctly. Your work still begins with steel, hydraulics, and hard physical labor to get it built and running in time for the shot.

In Special Effects, expect to get your hands dirty. There is a saying within the department that everything they have is heavy. There is a lot of physical labor in addition to the mental exercises you’ll go through in trying to solve challenges that are handed to you.





As far as school goes, I always recommend some type of higher education but NOT necessarily making "film" a major. Especially if you do not intend to be a Director, the curriculum in most "filmschools" won't necessarily be worth the time nor the cost. BUT, you SHOULD get a degree in almost anything else, like Business or History or anything else that interests you. The "film stuff" you can learn when you are out of school and interning or volunteering. If possible, DO take film courses, perhaps as a minor, but don't make it an exclusive subject to study.


For a COMPLETE description of all the jobs on a typical movie set, I recommend reading the book excerpted above. For more resources that could help you, please visit http://www.realfilmcareer.com/forum/ where you'll find a large variety of books and websites listed.
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#13 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 09:03 AM

At the moment, getting a camera would not be an option. I probably wouldn't be able to get one until I become a senior in high school (it would require a job and getting one right now isn't a real option since we have ALL of our tests this year). While I'm thinking about it though, can anyone tell me about some of the other careers in the film industry? I was thinking about becoming an editor or an Special FX guy (I practice around with Sony Vegas). Could you guys tell me about these careers?

Also, would you recommend I take other courses in college just to be better rounded or just take film classes and only film classes.


Look, if you WANT a camera, you CAN make it happen. Now just to give you some information, a S8 camera can be had is working condition for 10 to say 50 bucks.

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item27b80f045a

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item3a62641f88

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item230d7a29aa

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item2a0d66df3f

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item4156168ffa

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item2c5a2a6613

That is just from the first page on Ebay for super 8 cameras, there are 11 pages.

A tripod for a super 8 camera so you don't have to go with all hand held shots (NOTE, a tripod can be used as a steadicam by collapsing and folding up the legs then grasping it just under the head. The weight if the legs counter balance the camera and steadies it).

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item230c9f953e

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item230d1d50a3

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item588b9f779f

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item5641314566

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item230911eca3

Camera dolly, use a shopping cart, a wheelchair or a wagon.

lighting, start with foam core, bead board aluminum foil and Styrofoam , then move on to pick up a few of these.

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item20b68ebd0c

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item43a47ff94c

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item27b7f42a8b

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item4cf46e2740

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item2a0d684569

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item564210a8f7

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item2c5a231ed8

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item588be99e45

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item19bda3b2f3

Light meter

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item19c270020b

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item45f8255ef0

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item4aa7d20579

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item25608ac175

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item27b7fac2c9

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item45f811a845



Camera filters

http://photography.s...=3x3&_kw=filter

Here is super 8 film cassette raw stock

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item415619af7d

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item3cb4525993

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item51975c1e91

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item5ade85e21b

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item4155ebdced

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item4155ebd4d0

and again, that's just the first page. of course you'll need to process the film you've shot so

http://super-8mm.com/10.html

http://www.cinemaker...l#filmDeveloped

http://www.blackandw...com/super_8.htm

http://www.city-net....labs/labwe.html

http://www.littlefilm.org/Labs.html

http://www.pro8mm.com/

now IF you choose to edit traditionally and have the film prined or just use reversal film, here are some editing machines.

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item35af3f4c1c

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item4155f73414

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item20b68ea1d1

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item2c5a285040

A S8 projector can be had for almost nothing

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item19c27b6fc1

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item4aa7e03b61

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item45f8209109

Again, this is just from the first page and there are 11 pages. A portable screen (assuming you don't just want to use a blank white wall) also can be had for nearly nothing.

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item3cb4486e9c

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item415619475a

http://cgi.ebay.com/...=item483e96bbfe

of course you can just have it put on a dvd and edit on you computer.

You CAN own a film camera and all the support equipment to make a few short films if you CHOOSE to do so.

See, this is not "having a job" kinda money, this is "mowing a lawn or 2 on Saturday" or even "allowance" kind of money. If this is what you want to do, you can collect cans, do odd jobs, shovel sidewalks or do odd jobs. you can buy this stuff one peace at a time. I the meantime, start READING. There is one hell of a lot to learn about the film making process to paraphrase James Cameron, "I learned everything I needed t know about movie making for a $1.98 in late fees. Here's another quote from Cameron I find appropriate in your case, "Pick up a camera. Shoot something. No matter how small, no matter how cheesy, no matter whether your friends and your sister star in it. Put your name on it as director. Now you're a director. Everything after that you're just negotiating your budget and your fee." B)
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#14 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 10:37 AM

"If you have 16 feet of film, make a 16 foot movie." - George Lucas
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Broadcast Solutions Inc

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Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

The Slider

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Visual Products

Wooden Camera

Technodolly