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Questions about procedure...


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#1 John Young

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 09:48 AM

I wasn't sure where to post this, so I figured other students and first timers may want to know the same thing. I have been reading the 16/35mm Handbook by Verne and Sylvia Carlson (Fantastic book by the way), and it occurs to me to ask a question.

When I make my own films, I tell my crew to do things a certain way, usually not industry standard. But, since I have very few crew to work with, I do things that make sense to me. Is the industry standard still the same as it was 40 years ago? Is there a definitive place to go to see the correct way to do things? It seems to me that if things have been done a certain way for the last 80 years, they must have developed as the most efficient way to do them. Let me see if I can elaborate.

We know how to load a magazine, set up the shot/scene, the talent knows what to do.
Now, what goes on the log sheet? Why is there a log sheet? Is there a standard log sheet? What happens to the log sheets after principal photography is over?
Who decides which scene numbers go where, or do you just do them in order? What is the proper way to slate for coverage? (from script to slate?)

Well, that's just a few questions about procedure, feel free to ignore me.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 10:57 AM

Script Supervisor assigns the letters (and take numbers) to the scene numbers for slates and takes continuity notes. 2nd AC slates and takes notes on the camera reports, a form which is usually provided by the lab. Script Supervisor collects a copy of the camera report at the end of the day, and I also believe, gets a copy of the stock usage log that the loader keeps -- I also believe she or he gets a copy of the sound log that the production mixer keeps during the day.

The actual numbering of the script is partially done by the writer and the script software used these days, but often corrected by the 1st AD and the Script Supervisor to create the first shooting draft (white copy).

Now slate numbering is done differently outside of the U.S.

Let's say that the lab calls and tells you that there's a big scratch on Sc.4B, Tk.2. Well, the script supervisor can find out what camera mag that shot was on, whether there are other usable alternative takes, etc. so everyone can track down the particular piece of equipment used for that shot, and also know whether it needs to be reshot.
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#3 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 11:58 AM

I wasn't sure where to post this, so I figured other students and first timers may want to know the same thing. I have been reading the 16/35mm Handbook by Verne and Sylvia Carlson (Fantastic book by the way), and it occurs to me to ask a question.

When I make my own films, I tell my crew to do things a certain way, usually not industry standard. But, since I have very few crew to work with, I do things that make sense to me. Is the industry standard still the same as it was 40 years ago? Is there a definitive place to go to see the correct way to do things? It seems to me that if things have been done a certain way for the last 80 years, they must have developed as the most efficient way to do them. Let me see if I can elaborate.

We know how to load a magazine, set up the shot/scene, the talent knows what to do.
Now, what goes on the log sheet? Why is there a log sheet? Is there a standard log sheet? What happens to the log sheets after principal photography is over?
Who decides which scene numbers go where, or do you just do them in order? What is the proper way to slate for coverage? (from script to slate?)

Well, that's just a few questions about procedure, feel free to ignore me.



I touch on a lot of procedure in the book "What I Really Want to Do: On Set in Hollywood" so you may find a lot of your questions answered there. I'd also recommend the following books which should give you everything you're looking to know:





Camera Assistant, The: A Complete Professional Handbook (Hardcover)
by Douglas Hart (Author)
Product Details
Hardcover: 421 pages
Publisher: Focal Press (December 27, 1995)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0240800427
ISBN-13: 978-0240800424

The Camera Assistant's Manual, Fourth Edition (Paperback)
by David E. Elkins s.o.c. (Author)
Product Details
Paperback: 512 pages
Publisher: Focal Press; 4 edition ( January 28, 2005 )
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0240805585
ISBN-13: 978-0240805580



Script Supervising and Film Continuity, Third Edition (Paperback)
by Pat P Miller (Author)
Product Details
Paperback: 256 pages
Publisher: Focal Press; 3 edition (December 1998)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0240802942
ISBN-13: 978-0240802947

Continuity Supervisor, Fourth Edition (Media Manuals) (Media Manuals) (Paperback)
by Avril Rowlands (Author)
Product Details
Paperback: 193 pages
Publisher: Focal Press; 4 edition (July 2000)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0240516133
ISBN-13: 978-0240516134


Practical Art of Motion Picture Sound, Second Edition (Paperback)
by David Lewis Yewdall (Author)
Product Details
Paperback: 424 pages
Publisher: Focal Press; Paperback and CD-ROM edition ( February 28, 2003 )
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0240805259
ISBN-13: 978-0240805252



Film Scheduling: Or, How Long Will It Take to Shoot Your Movie? (Paperback)
by Ralph S. Singleton (Author)
Product Details
Paperback: 244 pages
Publisher: Lone Eagle; 2 Sub edition (April 1, 1997)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0943728398
ISBN-13: 978-0943728391


What I Really Want to Do On Set in Hollywood: A Guide to Real Jobs in the Film Industry (Paperback)
by Brian Dzyak (Author)
Product Details
Paperback: 384 pages
Publisher: Lone Eagle (May 27, 2008)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0823099539
ISBN-13: 978-0823099535
http://www.whatireal...com/contact.htm
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Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC