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#1 John Almond

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 04:43 PM

I am looking for a decent quality splicer guys, would you recommend tape or cement
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#2 andy oliver

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 04:51 PM

Hi, generally i use tape for super 8 and 16mm and cement for standard 8. For super 8 i recommend the Wurker splicer.. One on ebay at present, uk based though http://cgi.ebay.co.u...=item3a622a8366
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#3 John Almond

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 05:09 PM

Ah, Im in UK as well, that looks like a nice splicer and the guy selling it is well respected over here. I will keep an eye on that one, cheers
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#4 Bob Last

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 02:09 PM

My Bolex is a workhorse. Hammann is a work of art if you can find one - the best cement splice you can get.
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#5 Simon Wyss

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 03:08 PM

Everything you want to have copied must be cemented or welded in the case of polyester base film. I think you don’t find a lab where a film full of tape joints will be put on a printing machine.

Dailies/rushes are taped. Some work with Catozzo and likes, some prefer Rivas and likes.

Magnetic stock is taped only. One can produce inaudible joints.

Cement splices last as long as the film itself. Pressure-sensitive tape slowly dries up, becomes brittle, may fall off. Some of lesser quality tend to smear.

Also consider film and image formats. CinemaScope originals must be spliced in two rolls. Actually, 16 mm must be A- and B-edited as well in order to make splices invisible. Same with all 8 mm film. Ninepointfive can accommodate the splice between frames.

All this does not apply when pictures are being scanned and the edited data transferred back onto film.

You learn to respect film and human work within it by making wet splices. I’d like to suggest reading this book: The Technique of the Film Cutting Room by Ernest Walter. Focal Press
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#6 ignacio benedeti

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 06:02 PM

Tape splices made with Fuji Film tape last in first class conditin for more than 40 years now. Please, read this article from the british magazine International Movie Making, published two years ago: http://www.ibcinema....per8/stable.pdf
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#7 Andries Molenaar

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Posted 16 January 2011 - 05:27 AM

The only worry is that 3 meter of 8.5mm fuji splicing tape with 100 splices now costs around Euro 20,-
Which is, considering the involved manufacturing costs, ridiculous.

This fuji splicing tape can be had in many many shops in Japan (from stock!) at Yen 640 (last year). Imagine what the distributor price will be. Around 300-350?
You would also be amazed at all the film and photography materials still available from stock. An eldorado!

The sorry thing is none of these shops take an interest in selling through the Internet. So the one who does can (and does) charge anything.


The best and cheapest splices come from CIR Catozzo splicers :)

Edited by Andries Molenaar, 16 January 2011 - 05:29 AM.

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#8 Mark Dunn

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Posted 16 January 2011 - 04:17 PM

The OP is using super-8 so he's not looking at A&B rolling.
Cement splices overlap by about half a frane so are rather obtrusive. You also lose two frames if a cut has to be changed or re-made.
The CIR splicer uses plain tape so the cost per splice is a fraction of that of the pre-perforated Wurker tape- about a hundred times cheaper, in fact. A tape splice can be remade again and again.
You might find one on ebay. I'd want a very good offer for mine- I'd hate to be stuck without one.
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#9 Nicholas Rapak

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 11:11 AM

I use a Bolex-Paillard 8mm cement splicer. It's easy to use once you get the hang of it, and you only lose one frame total, which is almost invisible at 18 FPS. Tape splices obscure more frames, and the splices are always clearly visible.

Edited by Nicholas Rapak, 17 January 2011 - 11:12 AM.

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#10 Mark Dunn

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 12:35 PM

There's an overlap so it's two frames on a remake. Sure, the overlap only takes up one frame, but it clatters through the projector. A well-made one-sided CIR splice covers two frames and is scarcely detectable. Well, mine are, anyway.
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#11 Tim Halloran

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 03:50 AM

Tape splices made with Fuji Film tape last in first class conditin for more than 40 years now. Please, read this article from the british magazine International Movie Making, published two years ago: http://www.ibcinema....per8/stable.pdf


Nice article on the Fuji splicers, Ignacio. Thanks for posting.

What's the story on that magazine, International Movie Making? I've heard of it, but is it still around? Anybody have any info on it or some contact info?

Tim
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#12 Claus Harding

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 05:23 PM

For cement, I can recommend the Hahnel Kollmatic (battery-driven with burr wheels) as an excellent precise unit:

Posted Image


Claus.
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