Jump to content


1st Camera Assistant knowledge


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 montaser abou saada

montaser abou saada
  • Guests

Posted 24 January 2011 - 09:30 AM

Hello guys ..
i became a focus puller a year ago i started on ARRI d21 and then i'v worked on a movie on ARRI 535 .. witch was easy coz i loaded the ARRI 535 a lot .. recently i assisted on 435 and the Red One and it went cool ..
the thing is i'v never worked on 16 mm or Arricam or Arri 3 .. i was reading a book by jon fauer about Arri sr3 and it seems so complected in terms of changing to s 16 and i never did it ( the conversion to S35 or S16 ) ..
also a lot about IVS coz for all the jobs that i did it was already attached and they sat it up in the rental house
there is too many technical stuff that i have to know and most of the jobs am doing now is on RED ONE .. and recently i got an offer to work with some high level agency witch provides crew around the area .. and they have all the equipments and cameras like ARRI SR3, ARRI 435, ARRICAM LT AND ST, ARRI 3 .. and am really puzzled .. am really good in pulling focus the problem is with all that technical stuff .. any ideas ? is that all what written in fauer's book is a focus puller duties ?


best regards

Montey
  • 0

#2 Gregory Irwin

Gregory Irwin
  • Sustaining Members
  • 589 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Work is based in Los Angeles but I live elsewhere.

Posted 24 January 2011 - 04:04 PM

It takes years to become a good First Assistant Cameraman. It's not just about the focus pulling. It also involves all of the "technical stuff" - like an understanding of cinematography inside and out, knowledge of the equipment and problem solving. It also requires good managerial skills since you are running the camera department. Your question is quite broad. It sounds to me that you have much studying to do as well as gaining experience by doing and making all of the mistakes. Best of luck to you.
  • 1

#3 David E Elkins

David E Elkins
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts
  • Camera Operator

Posted 31 January 2011 - 10:47 PM

Check out my book, "The Camera Assistant's Manual, Fifth Edition" published by Focal Press.

David E. Elkins, SOC
Camera Operator
Connecticut
  • 2

#4 Brian Dzyak

Brian Dzyak
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1517 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Encino, California USA

Posted 01 February 2011 - 12:00 AM

...and the entire section on the Camera Department in my book, "What I Really Want to Do: On Set in Hollywood." http://www.randomhou...n=9780823099535

:)
  • 0

#5 Tom Jensen

Tom Jensen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1234 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • Dallas, TX

Posted 01 February 2011 - 12:16 AM

A good AC makes it look easy and that can be very misleading.
  • 1

#6 Daniel Bailey

Daniel Bailey

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 03 September 2011 - 06:32 PM

As a 1st AC you should know about the camera you are working with, such as how to troubleshoot and what to do when things go wrong. Also you should know how to calculate shutter changes and ND filter compensations should a DP look to you for proper settings. Like if you are at a T8 and he wants to add a ND6 and do a 200 degree shutter whats the stop? Some guys can give you DOF and COC. In most digital shows you will have a D.I.T or D.C.S who might be able to lend a hand should a technical question come up. I 1st a lot but work on union shows as a 2nd (working my up the food chain), and if i come into contact with a new system i will always go the rental house a day early and go through the menus and settings and just get a feel for it so when im prepping with the boys i have a little bit of know how. Like when we did a 3D show we came 2 days early just to set up and get a feel for the rig. Dont try to learn 5 systems at once, as time progresses you will soon see that knowing 1 camera really well, can help you along the way.
  • 0

#7 Aaron Francis Farrugia

Aaron Francis Farrugia
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Melbourne, Australia

Posted 10 June 2012 - 08:45 PM

Check out my book, "The Camera Assistant's Manual, Fifth Edition" published by Focal Press.

David E. Elkins, SOC
Camera Operator
Connecticut


i second this, easily the best book i read when i was getting my start in the industry and the same book i recommend to up and coming assistants
  • 1

#8 stephen taylorwehr

stephen taylorwehr
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles & Detroit

Posted 12 January 2013 - 11:12 PM

what david said.. and dont be afraid of keeping his book, the ASC manual and tools like P-cam close by. There's nothing wrong with not knowing something, the key is to know how to look it up and/or figure it out.... as long as it's done right.
  • 0

#9 Simon Ng

Simon Ng
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Malaysia

Posted 11 August 2013 - 03:50 AM

Hi

Daniel Bailey

 

May i know what's: COC & D.C.S ?

 

Best Regards

SImon Ng 1st A/C


  • 0

#10 Oliver Hadlow Martin

Oliver Hadlow Martin
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 102 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera
  • UK

Posted 19 August 2013 - 07:47 AM

Hi

Daniel Bailey

 

May i know what's: COC & D.C.S ?

 

Best Regards

SImon Ng 1st A/C

 

http://en.wikipedia....le_of_confusion

 

In simple terms its where a cone of light converges onto the sensor at a single point where it resolves at an acceptable focus sharpness. Each sensor size has a different circle of confusion which then has an effect on the depth of field (the near and far distance calculations change depending on the COC).

 

It is handy for planning some shots in pre-production. It helps you work out the acceptable distance you can push that T-Stop before your shot goes out of focus. Steadicam shots for example where the dynamic movement of the person can change a lot.

 

 

I don't know what a DCS is though but I presume from the context it is some type of DIT or technical assistant. 


Edited by Oliver Hadlow Martin, 19 August 2013 - 07:49 AM.

  • 1


Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

CineTape

Ritter Battery

CineLab

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

Glidecam

Opal

Wooden Camera

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Ritter Battery

CineLab

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

The Slider

Willys Widgets

Opal

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc