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Power usage when a super 8 camera is turned on?


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#1 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 07:51 PM

I am planning to do a time lapse shoot of construction over four or five weeks with a Canon 1014 AE (shooting about 12 frames a day.) To avoid unnecessary jolting, I am thinking about leaving the camera turned on continuously. The single frames will be exposed manually with a connected remote control switch that I also use with my Canon EOS 35mm SLR. However, I am curious as to whether a super 8 camera is actually using up any power (when turned on) inbetween frames? Obviously, video cameras and digital still cameras are extremely power hungry - when they are turned on, they are consuming a lot of battery power - even when their users are not specifically doing anything with them.

To add to this, I am considering leaving the Canon on auto exposure mode. At first, I was going to use manual exposure (my preference) and take readings using the EOS still camera. However, there may be occasions where I will not be there all the time. So I will have to leave it up to some of the folks working there to expose the frames for me at regular intervals. I just hope that they don't forget! A lot of these people are not all that knowledgeable about photography so I think it would be a bit too much to expect them to take light readings with an SLR and adjust the f stop on the super 8 camera. Leaving the camera on auto would be the simplest, no fuss solution - all they would have to do is click the remote release every half hour. Still, it is a huge favour that I am asking, I know.

However, does leaving the Canon on auto exposure use up any more power than if it was in manual exposure mode? I am guessing that battery power is utilised when the camera's trigger is partially or fully depressed? Though that presents me with a dilemma. To do single frame shooting, the camera must be in running lock mode and do that, the trigger is fully depressed. I guess the other question is - would a fresh set of AA batteries last four or five weeks when the camera is running like this?
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#2 Terry Mester

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Posted 27 January 2011 - 12:33 AM

Here are a couple Links to my Page on Recording Synchronous Sound, and it contains a simple technique to hook up a Camera to a Transformer powered directly by electricity -- using the Pause Jack. You could also hook it up to a separate battery pack instead of a Transformer. This would enable you to change the batteries without touching the Camera.

http://www.zeuter.co...fo/S8SOUND1.jpg
http://www.zeuter.co...fo/S8SOUND2.jpg
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#3 Miguel Loredo

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Posted 27 January 2011 - 04:56 AM

Only I can tell you on this topic is that shooting frame by frame with a Canon 814 AE you will waste 1 full set of batteries per cartridge. Don't know about the 1014 but don't forget to insert new ones before starting!
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#4 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 27 January 2011 - 05:15 AM

Thanks guys. Unfortunately, electricity won't be avilable on the site all the time. Yea, a battery pack sounds like the most logical thing but over here, there are possums around. These animals can be very inquisitive and destructive. They just might chew the wiring connnecting the battery pack. They will eat soap if it is left outside. And they like to crap on things too. I could put the cover of the battery chamber on slightly loose and tape over the narrow gap. When replacing the batteries, I would slowly peel back the tape and slide back the loose cover...but yea, still a risk of causing a jolt in the final footage. I plan to surround the camera with barb wire to deter the possums...though I can't really be sure that this will be 100% effective.
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#5 Terry Mester

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Posted 27 January 2011 - 08:31 AM

Are you using this Camera outdoors? It would need to be covered to protect it from the weather. I would suggest a strong plywood box covered with plastic, and one end of course being open for the view. I suggest using concrete blocks to weigh down the fence so that animals can't move anything. Use duct tape to keep the Camera secure.
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#6 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 31 January 2011 - 08:25 AM

Well, the project is off. My mother was talking over the phone with the guy who was in charge of the construction crew and mentioned to him about the filming. This guy said that he won't allow it. He said that the people working under him wouldn't be happy about being photographed. This is ridiculous because the camera's lens would be zoomed out to wide angle so any individuals would appear pretty small within the frame. And on top of this, it's filmed in time lapse so each frame would only be viewable for a fraction of a second. But no use pushing my point because I get the impression that I'm dealing with people with a stupid mindset.

Though the main reason the guy was against the filming was that there was the chance that I could get footage of them making mistakes. And if that is the case, then they could potentially be sued. So there you have it...I cannot film the construction of my mother's house on my family's own property...at least the first stage.

The second stage of construction will be done by relatives. If it's okay with them, I think I might film one whole day of the building work in time lapse.
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#7 Andries Molenaar

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Posted 31 January 2011 - 11:58 AM

Well, the project is off. My mother was talking over the phone with the guy who was in charge of the construction crew and mentioned to him about the filming. This guy said that he won't allow it. He said that the people working under him wouldn't be happy about being photographed. This is ridiculous because the camera's lens would be zoomed out to wide angle so any individuals would appear pretty small within the frame. And on top of this, it's filmed in time lapse so each frame would only be viewable for a fraction of a second. But no use pushing my point because I get the impression that I'm dealing with people with a stupid mindset.

Though the main reason the guy was against the filming was that there was the chance that I could get footage of them making mistakes. And if that is the case, then they could potentially be sued. So there you have it...I cannot film the construction of my mother's house on my family's own property...at least the first stage.

The second stage of construction will be done by relatives. If it's okay with them, I think I might film one whole day of the building work in time lapse.


Their opinion is of no interest. Why even ask? On you own premises you can film what you like. With or without people on it. Just as your mother can go and photograph anything she likes.
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#8 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 05:22 AM

Their opinion is of no interest. Why even ask? On you own premises you can film what you like. With or without people on it. Just as your mother can go and photograph anything she likes.


True. I know I would probably be within my rights to do so. Though I don't want to get on their bad side.
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