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SEKONIC INCIDENT Light Meters


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#1 flavio filho

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 06:47 AM

Hi all.

I'm looking for a sekonic light meter,I was told the one below would be one of the best and accurate:
http://www.amazon.co...96992326&sr=8-5

Although, seems the same product (only not a II-Deluxe one), in Amazon.com (USA) the CRITICAL review by one customer mentions this is a DIGITAL VERSION of the analog???
http://www.amazon.co...96992359&sr=8-1


For me would work nice, as its (SUPPOSED) to be compact and precise, since its REALLY analog, to use with my Bolex Rex-5 on the go.
Need advice. Its said the analogs are the good ones, more precise... Is it true?

Also, if there's another SEKONIC model (INCIDENT LIGHT ones) that is similar or even better, please tell me.


Thanks,

Flavio
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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 07:30 AM

I'm not sure how that reviewer got a digital meter from, since that would be a totally different meter.

You can use either digital or analogue meters with your Bolex. A digital meter just directly reads out the stops as numbers, rather than using a needle and then you working out the stop either by using the calculator dial or from the scale using slides for the different film speeds
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#3 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 07:19 PM

I didn't think the Studio Deluxe II was made anymore. I had mine for a number of years until it fell on the concrete in Rome and that was all she wrote :(

I picked up the Studio Deluxe III and it's virtually the same. Great light meter. Definitely worth the investment.
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#4 K Borowski

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 08:13 PM

I think in this case it is really silly to prwefer "analog" ovber digital. I mean, in terms of accuracy, 0.1 stops (digital) is far more accurate than the average human hand sets a camera lens.

I'm really picky from shooting reversal film, and I was NEVER more accurate than 1/4 of an F/stop. I use a Minolta IV, digital, and it is very accurate at 0.1 stop.

I suppose there are a very very few situations, maybe if you're on safari in a jungle for six months tracking an amazon tree frog, where having a battery-less, analog meter would be advantageous, but any other situation than that I would be just as comfortable, maybe more so seeing 0.1 stop increments, far more accurate than my eye can even discern looking at a needle, which is probably subject to drift between taking your finger off the trigger and the needle freezing in place.


I'm really not up on all of the different types of meters, but there are several good models that give you BOTH. Get one with a spot meter built in with the greatest ability to see low-light exposures would be my recommendation, not having an analog dial versus digital readout. Get one that doesn't take expensive, obsolete batteries too. My meter runs on the common AA cells, and I doubt I'll have any trouble finding batteries for it the rest of my shooting life.

Now is a great time to find cheap meters, with still photographers dumping them left and right in favor of the histogram and LCD screen (cop outs!)



So go with what is cheap, reliable, versatile and FAST before letting style and design influence your decision. The American Cinematographers Manual has an excellent section on light meters that I've never read since I already have such a good one. There are many guides as to what meter is best. Doesn't need to be "wind up" to be godd, unless you're on that safari. . .
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#5 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 11:26 PM

There are plenty of times where you won't have the battery you need, which is why I carry a digital (758 cine) and an analog (studio deluxe II) because you never know when at 2 in the morning on some highway your batteries are just going to crap out. And when they do it looks a lot more professional, and it really is, to be carrying around a nice back up meter.

Accuracy; they'll both be fine so long as they're calibrated. I don't normally stress over 1/2 of a stop "off" from time to time, and it'll happen no matter how accurate your meter is on occasion (sometimes more than 1/2 a stop) due to, well, the rigors of a shoot (stress/not enough time/ a dimmer gets "nudged," ect.)
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#6 K Borowski

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 04:14 AM

There are plenty of times where you won't have the battery you need, which is why I carry a digital (758 cine) and an analog (studio deluxe II) because you never know when at 2 in the morning on some highway your batteries are just going to crap out. And when they do it looks a lot more professional, and it really is, to be carrying around a nice back up meter.

Accuracy; they'll both be fine so long as they're calibrated. I don't normally stress over 1/2 of a stop "off" from time to time, and it'll happen no matter how accurate your meter is on occasion (sometimes more than 1/2 a stop) due to, well, the rigors of a shoot (stress/not enough time/ a dimmer gets "nudged," ect.)


I guess that is a good idea to have a backup on your lightmeter, if it just dies on you, too. Sometimes, I'll admit, my only backup is a pair of human eyes and the sunny 16 rule, and a camera meter (definitely NOT professional-looking, using another camera to determine your exposure).
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Glidecam

Visual Products

Metropolis Post

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Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery