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Picking Film Stock for Short Film


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#1 Derek Kocich

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 01:44 PM

I am shooting a short film on Super 16 Arri SR3 with a nice set of prime lenses. Many of the scenes take place inside of a house that has many large windows. I was trying to figure out how I could use these to my advantage and make my life a little easier by using a certain stock inside to get a look similar to the film "The Reader." While they used 35 mm (Kodak Vision2 200T 5217, Vision2 500T 5218, Vision3 500T 5219) next to windows with light pouring through, I wonder what lights they were also using along with it such as fill, key, etc...

So what I'm trying to understand is which would suit my situation better and why:
KODAK VISION3 200T Color Negative Film 5213/7213
or
KODAK VISION3 500T Color Negative Film 5219/7219

And also a stock that would complement one of these outside for a scene or two. One at night, and one during the day.

Thanks

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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 04:16 PM

Perhaps you should look at '07 250D. 1 Stop slower than the '19 but still a nice V 3 stock, and since you have daylight in windows, and you can use daylight lighting instruments ect it'll save you some stop as opposed to gelling the windows with CTO or using an 85 on the camera with D lighting or trying to dial it all out in post.
Most of the look of a film, however, doesn't come necessarily from just the film stock; the way it's lit and the locations it's shot in play a very very large roll, not to mention any post color corrections.
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#3 Chris Burke

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 12:51 AM

You could use the 7207 as you one stock for everything, or 7219 outside at night and for interiors and 7201 for exterior daytime. All the newer Kodak stocks cut together really well.
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#4 K Borowski

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 04:32 AM

From http://www.colorlab....l/16mmtoHD.html :

"Many students use 7219 exclusively as it is the fastest of films and can cover everything from low-light night street scenes to broad daylight, and, if exposed properly, it can work. However, it is not a substitute for no light. Many times we have seen exterior night scenes where large sections are nothing but black unless the camera passes a lit store front or lingers beneath a streetlight. The grain structure is not very tight and the difference shows up immediately in an HD telecine. Therefore, Colorlab does not recommend using 500 EI stocks for eventual HD transfer. You will get better results with a slightly slower speed stock and a little more lighting."

I stumbled upon this quote accidentally today, and it explains my sentiments even better than I could.

I'd go for older, slower EXR stock before I'd choose '19. Vision3 or not, this is the GRAINIEST color Kodak film besides maybe Expression 500T.

There's no need for it in this situation, anyway (If it were me, I'd be trying to get exposure and enough depth of field for '01). . .


I'm sorry, I know I am supposed to be thinking lighting, but I see two people of the opposite sex in a bathtub. Light through the window with a bounce card for fill. Seems like a very simplistic lighting setup. Don't see anything fancy. You just want to watch the lighting ratio. Seems rather soft light to me (as it should be, with a curtain acting as a natural diffuser), keeping in mind I am viewing this photo on a phone screen <_<
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#5 Derek Kocich

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 02:33 PM

All sounds like great advice. My professor also told me to go 250d inside and rig lights to daylight. I will have some flashback scenes that should reveal the character's prime which will be very warm tones inside in a dark room with godfather lighting and also with a soft box overhead so I'll probably use 200t. As for my one night scene, my prof also said 500t would be the way to go no question, but I understand the grain situation. I know it will be easier to light outside. Is it worth it for the look in your opinion?
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#6 K Borowski

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 05:12 PM

Derek, please don't take that as my saying 500T should never be used in 16mm. If you need the exposure, you need the exposure. A 500T stock looks far better than 100T underexposed a stop, pushed a stop, and adjusted in printing to the equivalent of a 400 ISO.

There are ways of hiding grain in the shadows in printing, so-to-speak, and then adjusting contrast digitally.



I just don't want you to think that 500T is "Magic" because it has the numbers "500" and "3" on the can. The speed is great when you need it, but it's just added grain in a situation where you have plenty of light.

Personally, I will only use 500T for nighttime exteriors or other extreme low-light situations with 16mm. Rememeber, areas with no exposure also have no grain. So I try to keep the contrast up. Highlights, shadows, with as little greys as possible, if that makes sense. Also important is to avoid areas that are out-of-focus, as this is where grain is most visible.


I take it you are finishing in 1080P or i?
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