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Tri-pod help


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#1 Cristian Carceller

Cristian Carceller
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Posted 14 February 2011 - 01:07 AM

So i have recently been doing some films shot on dslrs which are great as a student. I have been experimenting with lenses and filters ext. But I have been experimenting with with other camera movement tools like dolly's, sliders, and jibbs. But my biggest weakness and my next investment is on tri-pod heads and legs. But I dont really know where to start. I have my own velbon tri-pod which is whatever, but i shot my last sequence in my film with a oldish manofrotto that my friend let me borrow that he got 3 years back. I loved the feel of it so i did a little research. The price on the manfrotto 501hdv head caught my attention because of the price. But legs I dont really know anything about. And i like the removable head for sliders. So please head me in the direction of a durable and smooth tri-pod!
thanks
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#2 Nathan Blair

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Posted 21 February 2011 - 11:19 AM

Manfrotto is a great place to start! They offer some good prices on quality equipment. When I graduated from my tiny cheap plastic tripod, I was like you: I didn't have the finances to invest in something that was the "crem de la crem" as they say. I purchased the David & Sanford ProVista Airlift tripod with an FM18 Fluid Head. There's a kit at B&H that even comes with dolly wheels for $219! This is the best deal I've found for low price semi-professional tripods. It really got me far in my career and it's never let me down thus far. The only downside is that the materials they make these with are not durable at all. My tripod is now falling apart after 3 years of use, but having expected that, I've saved up over time to replace it with a more durable model.

If you're looking for something very professional and that will last more than five years out in the field, you should be ready to spend anywhere from $1500 to $2500. If you feel that you're ready for those prices, check out Sachtler brands, or some of the higher end Manfrotto's.

When selecting tripods, be sure to really think about what you need when you're shooting. Know your camera weight, and be sure the sticks and head meet the proper load capacity. If you think you're going to be shooting outdoors or in rough terrain, get a mid-level spreader, not a floor spreader! If you will be carrying it around, consider lighter weight models... there are tons of options out there that can fit your specific needs.
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#3 Cristian Carceller

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Posted 22 February 2011 - 06:37 PM

Manfrotto is a great place to start! They offer some good prices on quality equipment. When I graduated from my tiny cheap plastic tripod, I was like you: I didn't have the finances to invest in something that was the "crem de la crem" as they say. I purchased the David & Sanford ProVista Airlift tripod with an FM18 Fluid Head. There's a kit at B&H that even comes with dolly wheels for $219! This is the best deal I've found for low price semi-professional tripods. It really got me far in my career and it's never let me down thus far. The only downside is that the materials they make these with are not durable at all. My tripod is now falling apart after 3 years of use, but having expected that, I've saved up over time to replace it with a more durable model.

If you're looking for something very professional and that will last more than five years out in the field, you should be ready to spend anywhere from $1500 to $2500. If you feel that you're ready for those prices, check out Sachtler brands, or some of the higher end Manfrotto's.

When selecting tripods, be sure to really think about what you need when you're shooting. Know your camera weight, and be sure the sticks and head meet the proper load capacity. If you think you're going to be shooting outdoors or in rough terrain, get a mid-level spreader, not a floor spreader! If you will be carrying it around, consider lighter weight models... there are tons of options out there that can fit your specific needs.

Thanks nathan!
really some great advice... i will be checking those items soon!
thankyou
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Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

Opal

Glidecam

Visual Products

Tai Audio

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