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Has Eastman Kodak 2395 Teleprint Film Been Discontinued


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#1 K Borowski

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 10:30 PM

If this has been discontinued, how does someone get a finished-on film movie where the master positive and OCN are worth protecting onto television?
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#2 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 09:21 PM

If this has been discontinued, how does someone get a finished-on film movie where the master positive and OCN are worth protecting onto television?

scan from an internegative?
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#3 James Compton

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 10:18 AM

If this has been discontinued, how does someone get a finished-on film movie where the master positive and OCN are worth protecting onto television?



Karl,

Have a look a KODAK 5242 :

http://motion.kodak...._Films/5242.htm

I was planning to use KODAK Teleprint to give my DVD transfers some extra built in contrast. I learned of 5242 and how it is used for DVD transfers. Sure, 5242 is not the same. I was looking for a way to physically 'bake' the look into the image without further tampering.
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#4 K Borowski

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 03:09 PM

scan from an internegative?


Cute. :P


I'm talking about getting a finished print into the video realm with a minimum of tweaking, timing. My favoring prints is because you're "baking in" a look, as James puts it.

3rd-generation, and projection-contrast materials not being optimal, yeah, I guess this only leaves intermediate stock as an option. But, even there, the very low contrast makes it almost like having to time straight from the OCN.


I'm worried '42 is going to be discontinued soon too, now that Vision3 DI intermediate stock has been introduced. Basically I see this as getting to the point where we are being railroaded into HAVING to finish digitally, for lack of traditional materials.

I spoke with someone at Kodak yesterday, and he said he would get back to me, that they are migrating their site onto a new server, something like that to make it more compatible with new popular viewing applications and hardware.



Otherwise, transferring from a finished print now, is going to entail some sort of custom processing and flashing to keep contrast down. So either stepping into the DI technology or taking a step backwards 25 years to get the look of a print on TV.
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#5 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 01:01 AM

I don't see why the Vision 3 intermediate film could not be used on traditional IP/DN work. Don't do much IP/DN work these days but I was able to use the same recorder calibration as for 5242 so the contrast matches exactly. It is slightly faster with better whites. The Fuji RDI is specially designed for the Arrilaser because it has a non-standard green spectral sensitivity, Fuji still has the 4503 for traditional IP/DN and non-Arrilaser recorders. Kodak choose to go with one stock for both.
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#6 K Borowski

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 08:08 AM

Dirk, haven't handled it first-hand, but the technical article on the Kodak website talks about things such as "the dyes being specifically matched to film recorder spectral output."


It sounds like the color sensitivity has been altered so as it doesn't match output from the dyes of a traditionally timed cut neg.
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#7 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 08:22 AM

From my talks with Kodak engineers, the stock can handle both workflows. There was an official presentation where this was made clear to labpeople.
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#8 K Borowski

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 08:28 AM

I'm sure then that means that Vision [1] is on the way out then. . .


Cleaner whites are a good thing for all concerned. I'd like to see contact prints, optical prints on Vision and Vision 3 side-by-side though. Maybe I'll see if I can get my hands on some and post results here.

But, again, I'm worried when they start to mess with dye sensitivities. Film recorders are generally additive, whereas negative is basically a subtractive filter (granted it's being exposed with R,G,B).
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#9 K Borowski

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 05:27 PM

Unfortunately, I just got confirimation from Bob M. at Kodak that it has indeed been axed. So, it looks as if anyone wanting to finish on film is going to have to go back to flashed/pulled prints, or just give in and either scan or use MPs.


Granted the "Murder She Wrote" era has been over since 1996 (a long time before that excluding this one show), but it is a real bummer now that it is completely impractical and not process-supported.

35- and 16mm print stock, has been getting dramatic content onto television since the very early days of the medium. In an era before tape, anything else had to be live-action.


Another sad end to an era of film history.
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