Jump to content


Photo

Shaky Camera


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Abobakr Mohammed

Abobakr Mohammed
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts
  • Student

Posted 15 February 2011 - 01:14 AM

Hello everyone. I was just wondering, what are the best ways to achieve a shaky camera in a shot. I have seen some shaky camera shots that have been done by beginners and these shots become so annoying, while you look at others that don't.

I understand it depends on the kind of shot you are shooting... but I would like to hear your opinions and thoughts about this. I would like to know what are your techniques to achieve a shaky shot. thank you...

Edited by Abobakr Mohammed, 15 February 2011 - 01:15 AM.

  • 0

#2 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11939 posts
  • Other

Posted 15 February 2011 - 05:11 AM

Depends what you're after.

I watched an action movie yesterday where the gunshots had been spiced up by application of a little camera shake, clearly in post - a very fast, high-frequency judder that would have been hard to do by hand. Alternatively you might be trying to simulate the effect of a moving vehicle, which can, with practice, be done by hand. There are devices which will shake the camera for you, often involving a motor rotating an eccentric weight system. It's not impossible to imagine building something like this in the shed, if that's your thing. I've seen them used in various modes - I think they were used in Saving Private Ryan, with the power to the motors sort of pulsed on and off to give a jagged look to the motion. Then you have to consider your camera settings - Ryan used narrow shutter angles to reduce motion blur and make things look more staccato, which would be particularly visible on whole-frame motion such as camera shake.

The only note of caution with this is that rolling shutter cameras (including DSLRs, and a lot of recent Sony and Canon prosumer gear) can look bad when moved very quickly, with the wobbliness becoming visible - shoot tests.

P
  • 0

#3 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5070 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 15 February 2011 - 06:02 AM

I tend to act as if the camera is poorly balanced. Of course you need to know how that feels, but it tends to give a natural shake.
  • 0

#4 Abobakr Mohammed

Abobakr Mohammed
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts
  • Student

Posted 16 February 2011 - 09:04 AM

Depends what you're after.

I watched an action movie yesterday where the gunshots had been spiced up by application of a little camera shake, clearly in post - a very fast, high-frequency judder that would have been hard to do by hand. Alternatively you might be trying to simulate the effect of a moving vehicle, which can, with practice, be done by hand. There are devices which will shake the camera for you, often involving a motor rotating an eccentric weight system. It's not impossible to imagine building something like this in the shed, if that's your thing. I've seen them used in various modes - I think they were used in Saving Private Ryan, with the power to the motors sort of pulsed on and off to give a jagged look to the motion. Then you have to consider your camera settings - Ryan used narrow shutter angles to reduce motion blur and make things look more staccato, which would be particularly visible on whole-frame motion such as camera shake.

The only note of caution with this is that rolling shutter cameras (including DSLRs, and a lot of recent Sony and Canon prosumer gear) can look bad when moved very quickly, with the wobbliness becoming visible - shoot tests.

P



Thank you, Phil Rhodes... I truly appreciate you giving me this knowledge and this information... you were truly helpful. Thank you, thank you. I really appreciate it.
  • 0


CineLab

Willys Widgets

Technodolly

CineTape

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

The Slider

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

Glidecam

Opal

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

CineLab

Tai Audio

CineTape

Abel Cine