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Processing for Double 8 Kodachrome 25


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#1 Tom Sykes

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 02:23 PM

How do.

I've just acquired for a short while a Bolex P4 and have also got some old film stock with it, i'm finding it extremely difficult to find anything about processing the film.

It is Kodachrome 25 Double 8

Length: 7.5m

Year: 1984

Any information would be ideal.

Then i'll have some fun trying to load it :/

Many Thanks,

Tom.
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#2 Mark Dunn

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 02:43 PM

Kodachrome processing finished at the end of January.
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#3 Tom Sykes

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 02:59 PM

Thanks Mark,

I've literally just read on Dwayne's as well, gutted!!

Oh well, onto the next one I suppose.
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#4 Ian Cooper

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 05:14 PM

Thanks Mark,

I've literally just read on Dwayne's as well, gutted!!

Oh well, onto the next one I suppose.



There are other filmstocks available in double/standard-8.

"Photoworld" in Llandudno is one supplier.
Whilst they don't have a website, a google search will rapidly find their contact details.
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#5 Dom Jaeger

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 06:47 PM

Wittner in Hamburg have a good range of double 8 stock:

http://www.wittner-k...mm/d8_filmm.php

Also Kahl Film & TV in Bruhl:

http://www.kahlfilm....tent.php?nav=15

The Widescreen Centre in London sells a high contrast d8 stock (actually orthographic film) which I would avoid if you're just starting to play around with 8mm.

Not sure about UK/European processing.
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#6 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 06:50 PM

How do.

I've just acquired for a short while a Bolex P4 and have also got some old film stock with it,Kodachrome 25 Double 8
Then i'll have some fun trying to load it :/


As of the end of 2010, all unprocessed Kodachrome became "Leader" (or "Spacing" as some of the UK folks put it)

Kodak still makes a Ektacrome and Tri-X reversal in Regular 8 - but only in 400 Ft rolls. There are a few folks in Europe, as well as a Fellow in California, who re-pack this material on the 25ft/7.5M spools.

Foma in the Czech republic has made their R-100 B&W reversal film in that format.

TRY
http://zerelda.com/i...tionalfilm.html

http://www.wittner-k...mm/d8_filmm.php
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#7 Ian Cooper

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Posted 18 February 2011 - 03:07 AM

...The Widescreen Centre in London sells a high contrast d8 stock (actually orthographic film) which I would avoid if you're just starting to play around with 8mm.


The last d8 film I exposed before setting myself up with 16mm was some of that, Kodak 7363, only I obtained it direct from Mr. Nowill in London, the price was a fraction of most other filmstocks. (Again, a google search of the forum should bring up info, else I'm sure a PM or two will get contact details).

I exposed it according to Mr. Nowill's recommendations and have to say it looked really nice, fairly high contrast but really smooth with very little grain indeed. I sent it to Andec for reversal processing.

When I last obtained d8 colour film from Llandudno the chap was selling it 'process paid'. I'm not sure if he does the processing himself or if he ships it out somewhere, but the turnaround time was pretty quick.
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#8 Antti Näyhä

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Posted 18 February 2011 - 04:06 AM

Kodachrome can still be processed as black & white. There’s at least two labs that will do it for you, both in the US though:
http://www.filmrescu...#KodachromeAgfa
http://www.rockymoun...com/oldfilm.htm

Of course you might want to try it at home – here’s some info.

Edited by Antti Näyhä, 18 February 2011 - 04:10 AM.

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#9 Antti Näyhä

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Posted 18 February 2011 - 04:11 AM

Found one in the UK as well:
http://www.processc22.co.uk/
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#10 Ian Cooper

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Posted 18 February 2011 - 05:09 AM

Kodachrome can still be processed as black & white...


Although given the elevated costs and longer lead times, it might well be quicker and cheaper to just use the Kodachrome to practice loading and spend the pennies on a roll of new film & processing.

BTW. Loading d8 cameras is usually dead easy, can't remember exactly which model Bolex I've got, but they're all much the same. There are no 'loops' as such to form, you just pass the film through the gate, ensure it engages with the pull-down claw, then wrap the end on the take-up spool. I've been known to do the whole thing in a changing-bag so I can maximise the amount of film available and not loose any to fogging at the ends :) (It was also Mr. Nowill's recommended way of loading 7363)


Whilst the widescreen centre might be the only supplier in the Uk with a website, I'd still recommend contacting both Photoworld and Mr. Nowill - they're both extremely friendly and helpful, as are their prices ;)
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#11 Tom Sykes

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Posted 18 February 2011 - 05:57 AM

Thanks very much for the help folks.

I was actually going to do what Ian said and load the film and just have a play, then get some other d8 to use, I'll have a look at the links that have been posted. My mate actually showed me the process22 site last night, I might give them a call later, but without expectation ;)

It looks fairly straight forward on the p4, I've loaded 35 once before so it should be a breeze really.

Think i'm going to buy a super 8 camera once i've left Uni, to much work to do at the moment,

Any recomendations on a specific one? I've got a few in mind, the ones that are favourite are some of the Nizo models although I adore the Leicine Special, i've heard the performance of this isn't the greatest though.
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#12 Simon Wyss

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Posted 18 February 2011 - 02:19 PM

Stick to Double-Eight.

You will find the choice among plenty of cameras with sturdy mechanics, so many lenses D-mount or C-mount, very good projectors, and long rolls of film. Gigabitfilm 40 has been announced to become available in Double-8 this fall.

Do not reach for the 50-ft cartridge and those plastic toys.
I love to be mean.

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#13 K Borowski

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Posted 18 February 2011 - 03:26 PM

Simon, just so you know, there is a "storm of SH__" about to rain down on you for saying that.
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#14 Dom Jaeger

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Posted 18 February 2011 - 10:03 PM

The last d8 film I exposed before setting myself up with 16mm was some of that, Kodak 7363, only I obtained it direct from Mr. Nowill in London, the price was a fraction of most other filmstocks. (Again, a google search of the forum should bring up info, else I'm sure a PM or two will get contact details).

I exposed it according to Mr. Nowill's recommendations and have to say it looked really nice, fairly high contrast but really smooth with very little grain indeed. I sent it to Andec for reversal processing.


I'd be curious to hear what those recommendations were. Having just shot with some of the 7363, the grain is indeed very fine and the contrast beautifully punchy, but I found the latitude very narrow, especially on skin tones. In sunlight a slight underexposure resulted in skin shadows going black. I guess due to the lack of red sensitivity. Next time I use it I was planning to overexpose and stick to overcast days.

Stick to Double-Eight.

You will find the choice among plenty of cameras with sturdy mechanics, so many lenses D-mount or C-mount, very good projectors, and long rolls of film. Gigabitfilm 40 has been announced to become available in Double-8 this fall.

Do not reach for the 50-ft cartridge and those plastic toys.


I tend to agree with Simon, though I'd put it a little less harshly. I'm sure experienced Super 8 users are aware of the failings of the cameras, the cassettes and those tiny perfs, but that's part of their charm.

The main disadvantage to Double-8 cameras is the lack of information about them. There are dozens of Super 8 websites but virtually nothing on the older format. To that end, in my spare time I've been disassembling, servicing and testing every Double-8 camera I can get my hands on. I've gone so far as to manufacture a d-mount adapter for my work projector/collimator in order to project and assess 8mm lenses. Probably a loopy project, but I'd like to create a database of practical information about the format, maybe spark some interest.

I work with Alexas and Arricams, but when it comes to recording the intimacies of family life, or just having fun with film, nothing beats a beautiful old clockwork camera that fits in your pocket.
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#15 Simon Wyss

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Posted 19 February 2011 - 03:46 AM

Karl, I know I know. But there’s always a way out. There is an increasing number of novices so young that we tremble, twens and teens, who praise all-metal construction like it was totally new. Plastic crap they say like we never did. We only know. Let there be a rain of mind-broadening experiences together with all its implied shaking and lightning flashes. Didn’t we bust about in the 70s and 80s?

The only thing plastic in the industry must be the film itself.
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#16 Ian Cooper

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Posted 19 February 2011 - 04:06 AM

I'd be curious to hear what those recommendations were...


Will see if I can dig out his nice letter, I came across it again not that long ago... now where was that?! :huh:
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