Jump to content


Photo

Strange Lighting Discrepancy


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 BenjaminCarey

BenjaminCarey
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts
  • Student

Posted 20 February 2011 - 07:36 PM

Check out these stills. The character is sitting at a window, presumably lit by the sunlight pouring in; there are blinds on the windows but no venetian patterning on the actress' face. Any insights how did they light this? And I wonder why?

Attached Images

  • 3.jpg
  • 2.jpg

  • 0

#2 Mark McCann

Mark McCann
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 55 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • London

Posted 20 February 2011 - 08:11 PM

interesting. I cant give expert advice, but id like to give this a try and see if anyone will correct me if im right or wrong. Judging by the lamps shadow on the second photo the main light source outside [ the sun?] seems to be behind the left hand side of the curtains, if if where inbetween the curtains then yes the venetian patterns would be on her face. But what seems to be lighting her face is the ambient light from outside, which isnt harsh enough t create the shadows.

Im only a student so you would probably be better hearing from someone more experienced on this matter.
  • 0

#3 Chris Millar

Chris Millar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1642 posts
  • Other

Posted 21 February 2011 - 05:23 AM

The suns light due to its distance away is parallel/collimated thats why you get the hard shadows (its pretty much a 'point source')

If there were clouds outside the source would be diffuse and not cause the hard shadows - an integration of many point sources all at once ... The shadows are there, but they fuddle with each other until they are indistinct.

If artificially lit - which is probable - then the source was probably more like the cloud situation I just outlined than the relative point source of a clear sky sun.
  • 0

#4 Chris Millar

Chris Millar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1642 posts
  • Other

Posted 21 February 2011 - 05:25 AM

There are shadows on the curtains though - but they are closer to the blinds ...
  • 0

#5 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7117 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 21 February 2011 - 08:52 AM

Ignore the window for a second. It's 2 lights at least says me.
  • 0

#6 BenjaminCarey

BenjaminCarey
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts
  • Student

Posted 21 February 2011 - 12:34 PM

Yes, in the wide shot it is clear that there are two sources... one hitting the table from the left, casting the lamp's shadow, and another hitting the actress from the right. It just seemed to me that the lamp's shadow was hard enough that the shadows from the blinds would also be visible.
  • 0

#7 Mathew Rudenberg

Mathew Rudenberg
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 252 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 21 February 2011 - 12:40 PM

Yes, in the wide shot it is clear that there are two sources... one hitting the table from the left, casting the lamp's shadow, and another hitting the actress from the right. It just seemed to me that the lamp's shadow was hard enough that the shadows from the blinds would also be visible.


Probably, but it looks like the curtain is flagging the light off of the actress - you can see part of the shadow of the curtain on the table... The key falling on the actress is presumably softer as it doesn't seem to cast a shadow from the lamp. It does look like a fairly hard source however, but I'm always surprised how hard it is to get good venetian patterns...
  • 0

#8 Dave Renken

Dave Renken

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Washington, DC

Posted 21 February 2011 - 01:07 PM

Here's my take on this set.
There are two strong light sources. One from the left and one from the right. This is illustrated in the 2nd photo by looking at the lamp shade itself. It's lit on both the left and right edge. The left source is not lighting the person's face and is likely the sun. The right is likely a bounce from the sun (shiny board, or soft bounce or wall) or an large HMI. The right source is very close to the window.

The reason you have no v blind pattern on her face is the source from the right is too soft to create the pattern on the face; yet it IS creating a pattern on the window curtain. The pattern on the curtain is because the curtain is much closer to the blinds than the face. Generally, soft light doesn't make patterns, yet even soft light will create patterns if the gobo is relatively close to the subject where the pattern would display itself. Kapeesh?
  • 0

#9 Ari Schaeffer

Ari Schaeffer
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 26 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • NYC/NJ

Posted 21 February 2011 - 01:37 PM

Seems like it's just cross keyed to me. The edge lighting on the lamp from both sources (left and right) gives that away. You can also see the blinds are slanted, except for the middle pane. There's not much of an eyelight coming off that in the closeup, but that could be misleading. I'm going with they just softened that key and reduced the size of the vertical lines of the blind until they lost the effect. Interesting choice given usually you'd let that play.

I'd love to know if they needed to fill from in the room at all, or if the fill we're seeing is just ambient naturally bouncing from those 2 sources.
  • 0


Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

Willys Widgets

Technodolly

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

Opal

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Technodolly

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies