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Final output for film projection


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#1 Jed Shepherd

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Posted 27 February 2011 - 09:38 PM

Bit of an odd question but when a film is completed and sent back to film ready for projection, what kind of film is used. I know when filming you choose either tungsten or daylight balanced and then whatever asa/iso that you want but when editing is complete what film type is used for projection. I would assume it would have to be a film that isnt balanced in anyway so that the white balance isnt thrown out on certain scenes but i guess even this could be wrong.

If anyone knows if there is a standard or any information it would be good. Thanks
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 February 2011 - 11:54 PM

Bit of an odd question but when a film is completed and sent back to film ready for projection, what kind of film is used. I know when filming you choose either tungsten or daylight balanced and then whatever asa/iso that you want but when editing is complete what film type is used for projection. I would assume it would have to be a film that isnt balanced in anyway so that the white balance isnt thrown out on certain scenes but i guess even this could be wrong.

If anyone knows if there is a standard or any information it would be good. Thanks


Fuji, Kodak, and Agfa all make projection-contrast print stocks for current color negative films, they mostly just vary by degree of contrast, saturation, and black level. Kodak and Fuji, for example, have a "normal" contrast print stock and a slightly higher-contrast stock with richer color saturation.

You can print color negative directly to these stocks, or you can print them from a dupe negative.

It doesn't really matter, but the lab stocks are generally "balanced" for tungsten light since that's what the printers use, but since it passes through color filters to color-correct the image, it doesn't really matter that the source is tungsten. Most 35mm prints, however, are color-timed to look correct for daylight-balanced projection bulbs.
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Glidecam

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Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

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rebotnix Technologies

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio