Jump to content


Photo

Is it possible to shoot the stars?


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Spalding Hamsun

Spalding Hamsun

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
  • Student
  • Wellington, New Zealand

Posted 28 February 2011 - 03:35 AM

I want to make a shot of a house on a prairie at night. It will be shot wide: we will see the lights on in the house and the stars buring in the sky above the house. Is this even possible? I am shooting digital on a Panasonic GH1, though I do have access to a Canon 5D II (which is supposed to be better in low light)

Thanks in advance
  • 0

#2 Chris Millar

Chris Millar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1642 posts
  • Other

Posted 28 February 2011 - 03:50 AM

Are you happy with long exposures and timelapse ?

What camera are you shooting with ?

Often exposures to reveal the stars are long enough to produce trails - google 'equatorial mount'

I'm building a computer controlled one here in AK soon ;)
  • 0

#3 Karel Bata

Karel Bata
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 487 posts
  • Director
  • London - a rather posh bit

Posted 28 February 2011 - 07:22 AM

It will take quite a bit of effort, though you may find the process personally rewarding, but I think the chances that you will get exactly what you are looking for is remote. If you're planning to see the interior lights, they will be much brighter than any starlight, so you'll have to use two separate exposure and marry them later, in which case it would be so much easier to just paste in a suitable starfield from stock or create one in post: http://aestuff.mylen.../?tag=starfield
  • 0

#4 John Sprung

John Sprung
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4635 posts
  • Other

Posted 28 February 2011 - 02:14 PM

Shoot for your house and live action, and also take a still time exposure to get the stars. Use the still for reference when you put the stars in, in post.




-- J.S.
  • 0

#5 Chris Millar

Chris Millar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1642 posts
  • Other

Posted 28 February 2011 - 02:58 PM

Stars are actually suns - some freakin huge ones at that, including galaxies of them ...

Its just that their virtually infinite brightness is reduced to nothing due to their virtually infinitely small viewable section here on earth (one exception being our very own sun), most stars sections (a literally astronomical proportion of them) when focused are so small that they fall within a photosite or silver grain area of your frame, because of this you need to accumulate exposure over time... This same time will cause the houselights to blow out (even though they are no where near as bright as the stars)

I must look up the answer to why the sky appears black however - something to do with universal expansion or something ;)
  • 0


rebotnix Technologies

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Technodolly

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Opal

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Tai Audio

CineLab

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Opal

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Paralinx LLC

Abel Cine

Technodolly