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Questions on 18x24 Nets (open ended scrim)


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#1 Ronald Gerald Smith

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Posted 01 March 2011 - 08:05 AM

This is sort of a beginner's question but I am wondering if there is a way to rig up two more more 18x24 fabric open ended scrims (for the purpose of cutting down intensity of a light more than 1 stop) on one c-stand? Just want to save some space. I wish they made nets that go all the way up to 3 or 4 stops. That would be cool.

I don't really like to use wire scrims if I can help it. Anybody else prefer the fabric to the wire?
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#2 robert duke

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Posted 01 March 2011 - 02:26 PM

Yes there are ways to clip a second, third, fourth net onto a c-stand. Either a gag gobo head, #1 pony clips, or even tape for those who are challenged. They do make a Third stop net, and if you ask any recover/sewing shop they will happily make you in any variation.

Grips use the nets and electricians use the wire. each has their own place. wire scrims dim a light overall without a color temp change. nets can dim a specific area without changing color temp. Diffusion will also do this (soft siders, etc). A black silk 18x24 will dim a light by 3-4 stops.

There is always a way.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 01 March 2011 - 05:45 PM

If you are just trying to cut the overall amount of light, then what's wrong with wire scrims??? At least they will be closer to the light and thus the scrim pattern is less likely to come into focus. And they don't need a c-stand to hold them in place. I only use net flags as overall scrims when it makes sense to do so, like the light already is crammed with wire scrims, or the light is so high up that it is easier to raise a net flag in front of it than to get to the light to drop wire scrims. Or if I need someone to handhold a net in front of a light to fade in the scrimming.

Also, if you need to cut a light down by four stops, maybe you've picked the wrong light... I've only had to be that extreme when doing low-light night work and the units I have need to be very weak without being dimmed on a dimmer. For example, I lit a car on a process trailer with 650w zips but had to put ND.6 on them to bring them down the level I wanted.
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#4 J. Lamar King

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Posted 01 March 2011 - 07:11 PM

Last weekend I worked with the Alexa for the first time. My eye kept telling me 300w here and I wound up with heavy diff and two scrims in all the time! Takes a bit to adjust sometimes.

I also had a setup that I wished I photographed. I had set up a blade flag to cut light from a 4x4 Kino off the back wall but the Alexa just digs into low lights so much that we wound up clipping a double, a single and an 18x24 flag to the blade to have shape to the light. Sometimes it looks ridiculous but makes more since because you are in a small room. We were in a small Hollywood apartment and having everything C-stands would really crowd things.
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#5 Michael E Brown

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Posted 01 March 2011 - 10:52 PM

I don't understand not using the wires either. Less delicate than a net, plus cheaper when you do jack it up. At least one less stand. Perhaps easier to make adjustments to however.

I've also been using smaller than "normal" lights with newer cameras. I remember using 650s for backlights all the time, now I'm asking for diffused 150s. Plus, one 4x4 Kino can key a whole group of people. Certainly helps with the room temperature!
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#6 Ronald Gerald Smith

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Posted 07 March 2011 - 12:00 PM

Is it true that if you put 3 or more wire scrims in the light receptacle that it has the potential of popping the bulb - I just was told that something bad would happen if you put three or more wire scrims in there.....
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#7 J. Lamar King

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 11:57 PM

Is it true that if you put 3 or more wire scrims in the light receptacle that it has the potential of popping the bulb - I just was told that something bad would happen if you put three or more wire scrims in there.....


I don't believe that to be true. Maybe some heat could build up and shorten globe life but don't expect it to blow within minutes. I certainly wouldn't let it worry me. There is only so many scrims you can stuff into a lamp and if you need more than that you should change the fixture. Just remember for the next setup.

Edited by J. Lamar King, 10 March 2011 - 11:58 PM.

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#8 Ronald Gerald Smith

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 12:48 AM

I don't believe that to be true. Maybe some heat could build up and shorten globe life but don't expect it to blow within minutes. I certainly wouldn't let it worry me. There is only so many scrims you can stuff into a lamp and if you need more than that you should change the fixture. Just remember for the next setup.


Thanks J, I'll keep that in mind.
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#9 Tad Howard

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 09:46 AM

Wire scrims are for overall. Nets are for cutting down specific areas.
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#10 Daniel Lynn

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Posted 20 April 2011 - 01:04 AM

wire scrims dim a light overall without a color temp change. nets can dim a specific area without changing color temp. Diffusion will also do this (soft siders, etc). A black silk 18x24 will dim a light by 3-4 stops.

There is always a way.

[/quote]

But scrims/nets and diffusion are different things. Because the 'holes' in the nets/scrims are bigger than their thread/wire/mesh, they cut down on the intensity of the light without changing the quality (hard vs. soft). Within reason of course, if you cram a light with many scrims you might end up with a wire-like pattern. Diffusion, on the other hand, while reducing the intensity of the light, also changes it's quality, taking it from hard to soft or very soft, depending on the diffusion used.
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#11 John David Miller

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Posted 23 June 2011 - 09:27 PM

I much prefer using bobinet scrim over wire. You can find heavier bobinet. All my doubles are single layer doubles. The material is bobinet with tighter bobins. This is nice for larger frames when using them to shoot through, you get a lot less moire.

You can graduate nets easily by setting one net and the clipping another to it at the place where you want with #1 handy claps or binder clips.

Many places in LA will custom make graduated nets for you if you wish to spend the money. Personally, I would just clip them as needed so you can make adjustments and have versatility in your grip package.
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