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View finder vs LCD? Which do you prefer?


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#1 Shidan Saberi

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 02:55 AM

I've been trying to use my view finder for filming and focusing but it hurts my eyes. I have a very good eye sight but after 10 mins of looking threw the view finder my eyes become so blurry i can't read things right in front of me and it stays like that for a long time.

I've tried using adjusting the vf to my eyes but it still hurts. I can't seem to get it perfect.

Any advice? Should i just use the LCD which would you recommend?

Thanks
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#2 Markus Rave

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 04:29 AM

Sounds to me as you are not looking properly. Try to focus your eyes to infinity and then set focus on the VF. To me it sounds as you are focusing on close distance which of course will lead to what you describe because it is very stressful for the eyes to focus like that for a long time.
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#3 Shidan Saberi

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 10:19 AM

Sounds to me as you are not looking properly. Try to focus your eyes to infinity and then set focus on the VF. To me it sounds as you are focusing on close distance which of course will lead to what you describe because it is very stressful for the eyes to focus like that for a long time.


Thanks for your reply. I've been trying to set it to the text or put it on autofocus and setting it to what is autofocused. I'd like to try your advice. Do you mean to set my cameras focus to infinity and then focus my view finder?
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#4 John Sprung

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 12:47 PM

The eyecup type viewfinder has been with us since 1937, and has always been a negative aspect of mirror shutter reflex viewing. It was necessary to see the little ground glass image, and to keep light from coming in the wrong way. Before that, we had the BNC with the parallax finder, which let you operate with both eyes open. The LCD is even better than that, we can keep both eyes open, and put it in a convenient place, too.

For home movies it's not that big a deal, but if you're working long days and six day weeks, the toll it takes on your body is significant. First rule of camera operating is get comfortable. You'll last longer and do better at the end of the day.

The only problem with LCD's is keeping the light off so you can see them on exteriors.




-- J.S.
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#5 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 01:54 PM

The eyecup type viewfinder has been with us since 1937, and has always been a negative aspect of mirror shutter reflex viewing.


Actually, I'd have to disagree that viewfinders are a bad thing. For me, the diopter correction takes a lot of strain off my eyes, and the positioning of the finder allows me to be close enough to the camera to make camera moves an extension of myself. When I have to operate from a monitor, I lose some of the immediacy and accuracy to my operating.
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#6 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 06:06 PM

Actually, I'd have to disagree that viewfinders are a bad thing. For me, the diopter correction takes a lot of strain off my eyes, and the positioning of the finder allows me to be close enough to the camera to make camera moves an extension of myself. When I have to operate from a monitor, I lose some of the immediacy and accuracy to my operating.


I feel the same, being close to the camera you can be more 'at one' with the camera, and looking down a viewfinder with the other eye closed also helps me to focus my mind even further.

Shidan, have you had a recent eye test, how long are the takes you are doing?
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#7 Benjamin G

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 07:16 PM

Actually, I'd have to disagree that viewfinders are a bad thing. For me, the diopter correction takes a lot of strain off my eyes, and the positioning of the finder allows me to be close enough to the camera to make camera moves an extension of myself. When I have to operate from a monitor, I lose some of the immediacy and accuracy to my operating.



I agree 100%. I find it infinitely easier to follow actors smoothly and accurately while using the viewfinder. Using the LCD adds all sorts of outside distractions and separates you from the camera and therefore the action.

Almost every professional camera op I've met uses the viewfinder, but I have met one who always uses the monitor so it's definitely possible to be just as accurate with an LCD.
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#8 Shidan Saberi

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 09:56 PM

I feel the same, being close to the camera you can be more 'at one' with the camera, and looking down a viewfinder with the other eye closed also helps me to focus my mind even further.

Shidan, have you had a recent eye test, how long are the takes you are doing?


It's been a while since i've had my eyes checked. But i have such good vision that it surprises people at age 22. So i've never bothered.

I use a canon xha1s. I can adjust the view finder so that it will suit my eyes. I do it to the best of my abilities but still hurts. Also i'm sure that the xha1s vf doesn't work with mirror. It's just another smaller lcd.
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#9 Shidan Saberi

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 12:08 AM

I should mention that i also use a hv30 and a canon s5is for photography. They also have lcd vfs but you can't adjust them. So i've never actually had a problem with them. I can look threw those vfs for a long time fine. I must be setting up the vf wrong on the xha1s. Perhaps my method is wrong.

How do you guys do it?
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#10 Frank Glencairn

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 02:26 AM

I always hated view finders - so I was very happy, when they came up with halfway useable monitors, that can live on top of the camera (most camera fold out LCDs donĀ“t cut it though).

In the moment I use a TV Logic VFM-056WP 5.6" HD LCD and love it. Sometimes I also have a 22" full HD Monitor on the side - sheer luxury. Pulling focus on the TV.Logic is a piece of cake, with the "focus in red" feature.

I think there is no general rule, just a matter of what you are used to and personal preference - to each his own.

Frank
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#11 John Sprung

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 02:27 AM

When I have to operate from a monitor, I lose some of the immediacy and accuracy to my operating.


OK, it's a bit of a learning curve. But it's like the gear head vs. the fluid head. Once you have the skill, it's way easier on your body.





-- J.S.
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#12 Shidan Saberi

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Posted 31 March 2011 - 07:43 AM

Depending on the light outside sometimes i really prefer to use the view finder. with my photography camera i only use the view finder.

Does any have any advice on how i could set my view finder to get better results?
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#13 Shidan Saberi

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Posted 02 April 2011 - 06:16 AM

Thanks for your reply. I've been trying to set it to the text or put it on autofocus and setting it to what is autofocused. I'd like to try your advice. Do you mean to set my cameras focus to infinity and then focus my view finder?


I think i understand what you mean now.

When i adjust the vf even if its off my eyes will focus on it but get tired. I tried looking far out of the vf and then into the vf and that helped.

I still would like to know if this is what you meant?

Thanks
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