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Lenses with built-in optical stabilisation


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#1 Garry Torrance

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Posted 01 April 2011 - 06:42 PM

I was, until recently, under the impression that the IS/OS motor in some modern stills lenses was only useful for taking telephoto stills at longer shutter speeds (this is what it was designed for, after all) but I've since realised that it does actually work as an image stabiliser for shooting motion pictures/video (the only problem I know of being the noise of the motor).
Which raises my question: do motion picture lenses exist that use this technology?

Also, does anyone know of any well-known films/scenes where lens optical stabilisation has been used?

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#2 Konstantin Kovalev

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Posted 02 April 2011 - 06:58 AM

Well, as far as I know, 2/3" lenses have just recently began implementing IS, such as Canon's HJ15ex8.5B KRSE-V and their super telephotos, but nothing for film style lenses as of yet.
Personally, I think IS isn't as important on film lenses because film cameras are always used on some sort of support or stabilizing device, be it a jib or steadicam.

Other than that, I also know that large gyroscope stabilizers can be used to stabilize the entire camera, and are usually used when shooting footage from helicopters and such. So just about any nature documentary where you see those fancy aerial shots have some sort of stabilization used.
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#3 Garry Torrance

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Posted 02 April 2011 - 01:56 PM

It makes sense for the ENG-style zooms to have I.S., the most obvious use I see for it would be for hand-held field/documentary work. I hear what you're saying about it being largely redundant for film lenses.

Now that 35mm-format stills lenses are used for indie production more than ever, I think I.S. may become more popular: it would be useful when you want to shoot hand-held whilst avoiding the dreaded 'shaky-cam' (and for whatever reason you need to avoid steadicam). It would also be handy when using smaller lightweight dolly systems where a longer focal length might pick up some vibrations.

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#4 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 10:21 AM

There is the Schwem Gyrozoom 60 to 300mm.

http://www.simard.co...em/default2.htm

I used one years ago on a helicopter, although I don't know if they're up to HD.
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