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#1 albert camus

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Posted 02 April 2011 - 06:52 PM

Often times I find myself on a shoot that is using two or more cameras on first unit but moves terribly slow. Does anyone have any ideas on how to take advantage of having more than one camera on set.
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#2 Nathan Blair

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 09:21 PM

I'm interested in hearing other people's ideas, since I'm approaching a production with multiple cameras myself.

I've found that as long as you're popping off two shots that you REALLY need in one take, it's surely a big time saver. However I think the key is having camera operators that you completely trust, because you don't have to spend all your energy worrying about what they're shooting. You can also fearlessly have them go off and shoot cutaways/b-roll without needing to supervise them. Similarly, if you know a gaffer well, you'll be practically communicating in facial expressions, rather than lengthy conversations on whether the key light is in the right position.

In the end, maybe having multiple cameras is not the solution to what's slowing down your productions?
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#3 David Desio

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 11:35 AM

I'm interested in hearing other people's ideas, since I'm approaching a production with multiple cameras myself.

I've found that as long as you're popping off two shots that you REALLY need in one take, it's surely a big time saver. However I think the key is having camera operators that you completely trust, because you don't have to spend all your energy worrying about what they're shooting. You can also fearlessly have them go off and shoot cutaways/b-roll without needing to supervise them. Similarly, if you know a gaffer well, you'll be practically communicating in facial expressions, rather than lengthy conversations on whether the key light is in the right position.

In the end, maybe having multiple cameras is not the solution to what's slowing down your productions?


I've done a number of multi-camera shoots and what directors or producers forget is that you end up lighting for multiple angles at once. So this of course slows things down as the set up is more complicated. You have to hide things more, make sure that your cameras dont see eachother (I know it sounds stupid but when the shoot is hand-held and moving, it can be a daunting task orchestrating your talent, cameras, and lighting. Then throw sound into the mix.)

Sure the 2 or more camera set up can work and save time, like for stunts, action scenes (with very careful choreography) hell, sometimes even grabbing a close and wide during a static dialogue scene. But alot of times it makes things more complicated...IMO
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Broadcast Solutions Inc

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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

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