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Timelapse With a Canon 814


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#1 Marty Hamrick

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 09:59 PM

I'm going to be shooting some time lapse of a day on Lake Ontario with a Canon 814AZ on E100D. Been awhile since I've messed with any kind of film, if I'm not mistaken, the 814 is cart notched to handle the new film stocks, so the camera's auto iris should work on single frame as the lighting changes,right? I'm of course going to have a light meter, but as I recall, the Canon's auto irises were really good. I had a 1014E that was spot on every time back in the day.The test rolls I've shot with this camera have all come out great, but this is the first time I've tried time lapse. Anyone have an idea on where I can come up with a cheap intervalometer?
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#2 Ian Payne

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 07:35 AM

I'm going to be shooting some time lapse of a day on Lake Ontario with a Canon 814AZ on E100D. Been awhile since I've messed with any kind of film, if I'm not mistaken, the 814 is cart notched to handle the new film stocks, so the camera's auto iris should work on single frame as the lighting changes,right? I'm of course going to have a light meter, but as I recall, the Canon's auto irises were really good. I had a 1014E that was spot on every time back in the day.The test rolls I've shot with this camera have all come out great, but this is the first time I've tried time lapse. Anyone have an idea on where I can come up with a cheap intervalometer?



hi Marty, You will have to find a canon ,interval timer e. I do alot of timelapse with a 1014e and results are faultless on auto. have a look around.well worth having. Sometimes the interval timers show up, not that rare. Evidently the cheap chinese timers are no good for our cameras, only for digital slrs (ie; canon 450d, same connector)
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#3 Marty Hamrick

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Posted 13 April 2011 - 09:34 AM

Thanks Ian. I suppose interval timers pop up on ebay? I seem to remember an old Super 8 Filmaker magazine had an article about how to build an intervalometer out of an old electric alarm clock.
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#4 bureaucrazy

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 05:06 PM

[quote name='Marty Hamrick' timestamp='1302705267' post='348749']
Thanks Ian. I suppose interval timers pop up on ebay? I seem to remember an old Super 8 Filmaker magazine had an article about how to build an intervalometer out of an old electric alarm clock.
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It is very easy to make your own remote control. You just need a double wire, e.g. cheap speaker cable, a push switch and a jack plug. Solder one end of one wire to the tip of the jack and the other end to the first contact on the switch and then solder the ends of the other wire to the ring of the jack and the other switch terminal. Push the switch and it will operate the shutter.

It's a bit better than the shutter switch as it won't jog the camera
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#5 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 12:49 AM

Evidently the cheap chinese timers are no good for our cameras, only for digital slrs (ie; canon 450d, same connector)


Yes, as I found out the hard way. Previously, I had a Canon Interval Timer E which I was using in conjunction with my Canon 1014E. Some results here from my experiences with shooting time lapse on Kodachrome...



It took me months to track down this little device but now, it looks like it has disappeared.

Regarding the Ektachrome 100D carts, the ones I tried early on (at least two years ago) were not notched correctly and so I used an external meter for shooting. Though these super 8 cartridges that I used were not an officially released Kodak product - I think it may have been repacked 100D from some place like Spectra. However, as the current 100D carts are genuine Kodak products, I assume they would be notched correctly.
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#6 Will Montgomery

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 08:44 AM

You can also keep you eye out for a camera called the Kodak Analyst. These little Super 8 cameras are specifically designed for timelapse and have a really wide range of intervals.

The optics are not nearly as good as your Canon but they can sometimes be found for under $30 and are fun cameras.
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