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Shooting wide at a crossing


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#1 Christopher Norin

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 04:13 PM

Hi!

I'm shooting a scene at a crossing, mid-day. It'll be shot at 35mm or wider pretty much from where the photo was shot.

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Five actors going to act out a scene and do some dancing in the middle of the crossing.

The weather forecast predicts an overcast day, and I'm unsure of to light the scene. My idea, this far, is to put up big reflectors (20' x 20') behind the camera to brighten the actors, else, I guess there's a risk of "silhouette" them. To add some contrast, especially on the actors, I'm thinking of putting up 3 2kW gelled tungsten lights of to the left of the shot.

Does anything of this make sense? And what would you do?
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#2 Christopher Norin

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 05:22 AM

Additional thoughts.

I plan on using ultra contrast filters for my wide shot, to lessen the impact of shadows (unavoidable) in the kind of setup.

Is it going over-kill with lights when flags might be sufficient to add contrast?

Christopher
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#3 Alexander Disenhof

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 10:54 PM

Hi Christopher,

Even with an overcast day, 3 2ks gelled with CTB will give you very little output compared to your sunlight, so I doubt they will be very useful. If you want to put a light to the left of frame on an overcast day, I would get a larger HMI source (6Kpar, 12K, or 18K) and back it up and put it though a large diffusion frame. That way you can achieve a nice soft light that creates contrast on your actors. It will also have more spread, which is necessary for a scene that you are playing wide like this. Maxibrutes through CTB would be a cheaper way to do it too, and you could most likely get the output you'd need from these as well.

If you don't have the means for these lights, try larger solid frames for negative fill, and large bounces (although, depending on how overcast it is, may not do anything at all) to create contrast. Also (and this goes for any way you end up lighting this) try to time your shots to when the light is the most ideal! You may find that you don't need to light it at all until you go in for close ups!


Alex D.
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#4 Christopher Norin

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 05:34 PM

Thanks! I apors Kate your respons.

We endes up not lighting the wides at all, and used reflectors for some nice contrast on the closeups.
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Glidecam

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