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Minolta XL-400: what type SUPER 8 film do I need?


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#1 Joshua Coleman

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 08:00 PM

My friend's dad gave me a Minolta XL-400 film camera last week. I'm excited to shoot some film with it but am unsure of what type will work in this camera. I'd really like to shoot some color. The instructions say...

"TYPE G COLOR FILM HAVING AN EXPOSURE INDEX RATING OF ASA 160" and "BLACK-AND-WHITE OR 'OUTDOOR-INDOOR' TYPE A COLOR FILM HAVING A DAYLIGHT RATING OF ASA 25 OR 100 AND A TUNGSTEN INDEX OF ASA 40 OR 160, RESPECTIVELY".

I've shot a TON of video over the years but never film. I'm very excited to try this. Thanks in advance for any help.

Joshua
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#2 Chris Burke

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Posted 11 April 2011 - 07:39 AM

your camera has a 220 degree shutter angle so that translates to a thirtieth of a second. With that bit of info; use any color tungsten color negative super 8 and meter for a plus one (you meter reading plus one stop). That means:

COLOR NEGATIVE
7213 for brighter light, 7219 for low light.


BLACK AND WHITE
7266 Tri-X which is the black and white stock, will meter correctly with the internal meter (providing it is accurate)or you can meter for the film speed at a thirtieth.


COLOR REVERSAL
7285 will meter correctly as well, but again you will do better metering it yourself with and incident meter or better yet spot meter. hope this helps.


Do not use the built in filter, you won't need it and it will degrade the image. Use external filters attach in front of the lens. If you can not get an external filter, don't worry, but you really don't need to use the internal one. It is probably all faded and dried up anyway, even warped a bit, which all degrade the final image. If you can afford it, have the camera tuned up, have them remove the internal 85.





***side note*** I just shot some 7285 on a Beulieu 4008IV and it looks amazing, quite sharp, loads of color.
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#3 Chris Burke

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Posted 11 April 2011 - 07:48 AM

your camera has a 220 degree shutter angle so that translates to a thirtieth of a second. With that bit of info; use any color tungsten color negative super 8 and meter for a plus one (you meter reading plus one stop). That means:

COLOR NEGATIVE
7213 for brighter light, 7219 for low light.


BLACK AND WHITE
7266 Tri-X which is the black and white stock, will meter correctly with the internal meter (providing it is accurate)or you can meter for the film speed at a thirtieth.


COLOR REVERSAL
7285 will meter correctly as well, but again you will do better metering it yourself with and incident meter or better yet spot meter. hope this helps.


Do not use the built in filter, you won't need it and it will degrade the image. Use external filters attach in front of the lens. If you can not get an external filter, don't worry, but you really don't need to use the internal one. It is probably all faded and dried up anyway, even warped a bit, which all degrade the final image. If you can afford it, have the camera tuned up, have them remove the internal 85.





***side note*** I just shot some 7285 on a Beulieu 4008IV and it looks amazing, quite sharp, loads of color.
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#4 Nicholas Rapak

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Posted 11 April 2011 - 11:38 AM

For your first roll(s), I would recommend Ektachrome 100D, the 7285 that Chris mentions. Not only will it work with your camera's internal light meter without manual exposure adjustment, it's a reversal film, which means that you can project the images right after you get your film developed. You can also get it transferred to video for cheaper than negative film.

I also notice your profile says you are a student. If you are a college student (in the USA) with a valid .edu email address, you can get discount film stock direct from Kodak: Kodak Education Store.

As for processing, there are two options that I use. The first is the Walmart option. All you do is go to the film dropbox, and fill out an envelope that says "Super 8mm film, process E-6" or something similar. It comes back in about 2 weeks, and costs anywhere from $4.88 to $6.88, depending on the location. The advantage is that it's cheap, the disadvantages are that the film is sometimes dusty, and they use cheap polyester leader that enjoys jamming my projector. I use this option most of the time, just because I am usually short on cash, and it's easy enough to clean and put new leader on. The other lab I use is BPS Film Lab in Batavia, IL. They're $12.50 a roll, but the film is always clean and they use Kodak acetate leader that doesn't jam my projector. They don't have a website, but you can call them at 630-879-8200 for more info.
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Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

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Glidecam

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

The Slider

Opal

rebotnix Technologies

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

CineTape

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Broadcast Solutions Inc