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Daylight Stock w/ 81EF or 85?


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#1 Evan Andrew John Prosofsky

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Posted 14 April 2011 - 01:38 PM

Hi there,

Will be shooting inside a waterpark this coming weekend on 7201. Would like the results to appear very golden and warm. I was considering the potential of adding an 81EF or 85 filter to warm up the image. Has anyone done this before, what are the results like? Does anyone have any footage they could show me, stories they could tell, or films they could reference which have done so?

Thanks!

Evan
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#2 Nicholas Rapak

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Posted 14 April 2011 - 02:42 PM

An 85 will just make everything look orange. An 81 series filter will deliver a nice warming effect to the image, with the 81A delivering the weakest effect, and an 81EF delivering the strongest. If you want to see what effect it will have, shoot a few frames with the filter on a digital camera, and the white balance set to "daylight". It won't be exactly the same, but you'll get a good idea of what you're looking at.
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#3 Evan Andrew John Prosofsky

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 05:10 PM

An 85 will just make everything look orange. An 81 series filter will deliver a nice warming effect to the image, with the 81A delivering the weakest effect, and an 81EF delivering the strongest. If you want to see what effect it will have, shoot a few frames with the filter on a digital camera, and the white balance set to "daylight". It won't be exactly the same, but you'll get a good idea of what you're looking at.

Thanks for the suggestion nicholas, using a stills camera is a good idea.

Is it safe to assume that conversely, if using tungsten balanced stock, an 85 combined with an 81EF would give the same desired warming effect as daylight film with an 81EF?
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 10:08 PM

Thanks for the suggestion nicholas, using a stills camera is a good idea.

Is it safe to assume that conversely, if using tungsten balanced stock, an 85 combined with an 81EF would give the same desired warming effect as daylight film with an 81EF?


I saw a behind-the-scenes photo of Storaro shooting an exterior for "Sheltering Sky" and you can see an 81EF tag on the matte box and Kodak 50D stock on the mag.

I know that "Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me" was shot with a double 85 filter ( i.e. An 85 filter on top of daylight balance).

Yes to your last question.
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#5 Evan Andrew John Prosofsky

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Posted 16 April 2011 - 11:37 PM

I saw a behind-the-scenes photo of Storaro shooting an exterior for "Sheltering Sky" and you can see an 81EF tag on the matte box and Kodak 50D stock on the mag.

I know that "Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me" was shot with a double 85 filter ( i.e. An 85 filter on top of daylight balance).

Yes to your last question.

Thanks David!

Helpful and informative as always :)
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