Jump to content


Photo

Video Editing Software


  • Please log in to reply
23 replies to this topic

#1 David Kroell

David Kroell

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
  • Student
  • Virginia, United States

Posted 16 April 2011 - 04:01 AM

Hey guys!

I have been given some money recently to buy a good Video editing Program, I have done some research about FInal Cut pro and Adobe Premier. The comments and rates on both programs seem to level each other out.

Please help me and give me feed back on both programs if you've had experience with them. (Or just experience with one)




Thank you
David Kroell

Edited by David Kroell, 16 April 2011 - 04:02 AM.

  • 0

#2 Stuart Page

Stuart Page
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 41 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Auckland, New Zealand

Posted 16 April 2011 - 04:31 AM

Since Apple announced and demoed the new Final Cut Pro X a couple of days ago, there is no question what edit software to go with. This latest update is actually a completely new build from the ground up and is essentially an AVID and Premiere killer. If you don't have a Mac already, buy one! And get this incredible new package (when it's released in June).
  • 0

#3 John Young

John Young
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 181 posts
  • Other
  • Lexington, KY

Posted 16 April 2011 - 08:43 AM

The problem I find with most editors is that they will not allow me to do very specific things, such as set the exact pixel dimensions I want to use, or have very intimate control over the frame placement. I find that I like some of the features of one but one others. For Avid, it's the real time playback ability, but I don't like how I have to dig so deep in the program to find options to work with film. It seems they WANT me to shoot digital so I can make use of the tools THEY want me to use. No Avid for me.

Final cut seems like a nice program. I own several Macs, and just sold my Mac pro. I have no need for a laptop in a box, OR an over priced dell (since they are now made in the same factory). I'll not vent my frustration on Mac here. I found Final Cut pro very cumbersome to use. It did not like some of my footage file choices, and (of course) wants everything to be in ProRes. Edit: However, if Final Cut Pro X is as good as it looks, AND still allows me to do what I need to do, I may start using that because it LOOKS fantastic. But once again, it also looks like its geared towards people shooting DSLR.

Premiere Pro I find fantastically easy to use. I love the integration with other programs in the suite. It is what I use most often to edit. I don't like the fact that you have to have specific hardware to obtain full realtime playback on ANY codec, but that goes for the above as well. I love the ease of use when working with the timeline, and for a non-linear editor I think it's the best one! Of course it get's no respect because somebody who knows somebody else used Avid or FCP. But, I'll tell you this: If the program you use has all the features and sparklies that you need, then fine. After all, when rendered to a DVD, it's not gonna matter which program was used. A hard cut frame to frame splice looks the same on every NLE.

They all work with DPX and seem to all be able to edit PRoRes 79.45.8 or whatever the current flavor of the month is.
  • 0

#4 Robert Farrell

Robert Farrell

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Student

Posted 16 April 2011 - 08:52 AM

It comes down to personal opinion really, obviously FCP is the software to use these days and there is a reason for that, it's going to allow you to do pretty much everything you'll want to do but as John said, it can be cumbersome and it can get complicated at times but once you get to know your way around it, it does get easier. Premier is going to be a whole lot easier to use, it's pretty straightforward regarding it's menu's and tools etc, you won't be overwhelmed. Premier was the first editing system I used and it definitely helped me learn, so it's up to you whether you go for the quick, simple option or the longer, maybe more rewarding option, either way it's not going to matter which you used once your project is finished.
  • 0

#5 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11941 posts
  • Other

Posted 16 April 2011 - 01:43 PM

On one level it doesn't really matter. All decent NLEs will let you do effecively the same things, as regards their actual edit functionality, and most of them work in very nearly the same way in any case. The differentiation comes from the ancilliary tools - which codecs and file formats are supported, how import and export works, etc. It is up to the individual to evaluate these things as it's hard n know what someone's requirements are. For instance if you're doing a lot of DSLR stuff, you'd probably want a windows PC with Premiere on it. If you're doing a lot of stuff with ProRes files, you might be better served with a Mac.

Otherwise it's a case of fashion, politics and compatibility. If you're working with a lot of other people who use Avid, then you might prefer Avid. If you have the sort of clients who need to see a famous name on the door - well, Avid again. If you already own a windows PC, you probably won't be running Final Cut on it, etc.

But as far as what you can actually achieve in terms of editing, it's a crapshoot - they all do broadly the same work.

P
  • 0

#6 David Kroell

David Kroell

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
  • Student
  • Virginia, United States

Posted 16 April 2011 - 04:02 PM

Thank You for your Feedback!
I think that reading the last comment tells me to save up more for both! Who knows what Might come at me in the future!
  • 0

#7 Brian Rose

Brian Rose
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 896 posts
  • Student
  • Kansas City area

Posted 17 April 2011 - 02:34 PM

My answer is much like cameras. They're all tools suited for different purposes, and your choice should be defined by your circumstances. Are you working from home, but need to be able to take projects from your computer to a clients? What do those clients use? Or is this for independent projects, standalones? What kind of system do you currently have, and what would be involved in terms of cost to switch OS's to accommodate getting a newer, different NLE? Is there a specific kind of work you do, which one program might be better suited for than the other?

I've dealt with many people who defend their gear and their software as a zealot does of their denomination. It is small wonder, which how much money people spend on cameras and lens adapters and DSLRs and tripod sliders and editing systems and RAIDS and they're all so many toys, fashion statements, keeping up with the Joneses.

I for one, am expertly skilled with both Final Cut and Premiere. For my clients, when I work in their production houses, I often use Final Cut. I would say it is the standard, but it is becoming easier to transfer workflows between the two. For a lot of my other work, including the films I make personally, I love Premiere Pro. I've chosen to stick with it because I am pleased with what it does, and because of my current budget, the cost of an upgrade, getting a Mac computer and software is too cost prohibitive, and the benefit isn't worth it to me. I am satisfied with the system I custom built, and constantly upgrade, and like being able to keep up with the trends without having to constantly buy new gear to do it. And if I have to do something on FCP, I've got enough connections, can call in enough favors that I could do the job without having to shell out $$$ for a new system and software.

But most important is that I've made this decision based upon a lot of experience. It is an educated choice which I think many do not make, instead assuming the rather ignorant stance of "Macs/Final Cut is the best, or saying one program will kill Avid or Premiere." It's rather a large statement to make, assuming Avid and Premiere will do nothing to adapt to Final Cut, which I highly doubt. These companies are motivated by profit, which is good for us because they will keep revising their product to keep their loyal users happy, and attract new users.

I would suggest that you seek out opportunities that will afford you the chance to try out each NLE that interests you. Find out for yourself what its pros and cons are TO YOU and YOUR work. Find out what other stuff you will need to support it. Will your current system do the job, or will you need to beef up your ram, or get a whole new system or OS? Figure out what your budget is, and how you intend to pay it off. Some people can afford to buy all the toys they want, but for most of us, we have to think carefully about these purchases. You wouldn't buy a brand new car just because, would you? For most of us, we get a car because we need one to enable us to fulfill the demands of our work, and therefore it pays for itself by the income it allows us to draw. The same can be said for editing systems and camera gear.

Good luck in your search, and take comfort knowing that, in my opinion, there is NO wrong choice you can make. Only an ill-informed one. And thankfully, by using those networking connections to get some hands on experience, as well as the internet for information, getting informed is about the ONLY thing in this biz that is (or should be) 100% free.

Best,
BR
  • 0

#8 Christopher Husta

Christopher Husta
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Boston MA

Posted 20 April 2011 - 11:56 AM

Not sure if this was sugjested already but there is a program called Lightworks and its free. Its been used to edit some pretty big films. Some examples are The Kings Speech, Shutter Island, Soloist, Good Will Hunting, Pulp Fiction ect.

http://www.lightworksbeta.com/
  • 0

#9 John Sprung

John Sprung
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4635 posts
  • Other

Posted 20 April 2011 - 04:34 PM

If you want to work in entertainment, film or TV, by far the most widely used is Avid, like 90%+. Among the others, FCP is the only one with a significant number of shows. Lightworks has been nibbling around the edges for a couple decades.

Go with something standard, so you won't have to bother unlearning and re-learning a user interface.




-- J.S.
  • 0

#10 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5070 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 17 July 2011 - 09:07 AM

Since Apple announced and demoed the new Final Cut Pro X a couple of days ago, there is no question what edit software to go with. This latest update is actually a completely new build from the ground up and is essentially an AVID and Premiere killer. If you don't have a Mac already, buy one! And get this incredible new package (when it's released in June).


Doesn't seem that way now, many pros aren't happy and are looking hard at AVID and Première because Apple have stopped FCP7 and FCP X is currently more consumer than professional centred. Adobe & Avid are going good deals for FCP owners (50% discounts etc).

Edited by Brian Drysdale, 17 July 2011 - 09:08 AM.

  • 0

#11 Matthew W. Phillips

Matthew W. Phillips
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1792 posts
  • Other

Posted 17 July 2011 - 01:56 PM

Its Avid for me. People I knew at college tried to turn me onto FCP but I just cant do it. But that is also a matter of opinion. See what works for you...they are all just tools and they can all get your job done.
  • 0

#12 Marcus Joseph

Marcus Joseph
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 404 posts
  • Other
  • Sydney, Australia

Posted 18 July 2011 - 03:47 AM

I'm probably one of the few that really enjoys FCP X and thinks it's fantastic, but then again, all my professional editing is web based delivery. But it just allows so much scanning and skimming and organising in such a little amount of time, it is quite nice in that regard. But personally it is a real pain to try to do some things in it though, I struggle to make a simple timelapse clip for instance, so I revert back to FCP 7 for that kind of work.

I've used them all and it just comes down to what you prefer and enjoy, if you get any professional gigs in film post or on a TV series, you just have to learn the system they use and get quick at it. It probably takes a max of two weeks of solid editing to learn your way around any of the systems they're using.

But when it comes down to personal projects, it's just a matter of preference.
  • 0

#13 John Sprung

John Sprung
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4635 posts
  • Other

Posted 18 July 2011 - 01:31 PM

Doesn't seem that way now, many pros aren't happy and are looking hard at AVID and Première ....


Premiere isn't even a consideration. It's all Avid now. Apple was getting a toehold, then they shot themselves in the foot -- at least as far as the professional market is concerned. But the big money is in consumer, that's where the volume is.




-- J.S.
  • 0

#14 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5070 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 18 July 2011 - 02:07 PM

The BBC has ordered 2000 Premiere

http://www.broadcast...5018203.article

Where it fits in with the overall scheme of things on the higher end productions as against the general programmes may be another matter.
  • 0

#15 Gary Lemson

Gary Lemson
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 155 posts
  • Other
  • Santa Cruz Mountains

Posted 18 July 2011 - 10:17 PM

Another one that doesn't seem to get much press is Grass Valley Edius. I've used it in recent years, as they adopted P2 MXF well before Premier did.
  • 0

#16 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5070 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 19 July 2011 - 02:37 AM

Another one that doesn't seem to get much press is Grass Valley Edius. I've used it in recent years, as they adopted P2 MXF well before Premier did.


There's also Sony Vegas, although the main NLE players in the professional market currently are AVID, FCP and Premiere. Choice really depends on your own and your client's needs.
  • 0

#17 Matthew W. Phillips

Matthew W. Phillips
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1792 posts
  • Other

Posted 19 July 2011 - 02:39 AM

Some people swear by Vegas. I have tried to use it but it never clicked with me. It didnt feel as intuitive but then again, I didnt get Premiere either. Vegas is sufficient for most peoples needs though, I would think.
  • 0

#18 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5070 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 19 July 2011 - 04:06 AM

I've got Vegas, but I found playing with the Lightworks beta more fun.
  • 0

#19 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7118 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 19 July 2011 - 08:04 AM

A Director I work with a lot uses Vegas... but in as they say, what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas... meaning it was a bear to get stuff out for any other program (e.g. Color, Soundtrack....) w/o an export.
  • 0

#20 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5070 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 19 July 2011 - 08:34 AM

A Director I work with a lot uses Vegas... but in as they say, what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas... meaning it was a bear to get stuff out for any other program (e.g. Color, Soundtrack....) w/o an export.


Vegas seems to be very much a stand alone program, OK for a production that can be done completely within it. You can do a lot doing this, but for other productions it can be limiting.
  • 0


Willys Widgets

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

Opal

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

Opal

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

CineLab

The Slider

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies