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Manual Iris Control on Nizo 481 Macro with PX625 batteries


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#1 Mark Sperry

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Posted 20 April 2011 - 04:56 PM

I'm a super 8 newbie. I come from still photography, and have had very limited use of only digital video equipment. I do however use a lot of vintage still cameras, which is where this concern comes from.

I just got a Nizo 481 Macro.

I have a question about the meter batteries. I got PX625 batteries, which are 1.5v. It calls of course for 1.35v batts that aren't made anymore, except by Wein. The greater voltage causes the Auto exposure to put the needle on F11 when doing a battery check, which is incorrect (it should go to F8). So it's improperly exposing on auto (This could mean by exactly one stop under, but I don't want to waste film to be sure). This is fine, because I have an external meter, but my question is, will this greater voltage affect the manual setting of the iris? Can I be sure that when the needle indicates 2.8, it is 2.8? My concern is that the greater voltage will effect BOTH manual and auto exposure. This would be mostly just annoying, because I'd have to order the Wein cells online.

I wish it was a little more like my still cameras, in which case I wouldn't need a battery to set the exposure manually. New world for me I guess!
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#2 Martin Baumgarten

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Posted 20 April 2011 - 07:58 PM

When adjusting the exposure in Manual mode on any of the NIZO S-xxx series cameras, yours included, the battery power voltage makes no difference. Since the camera relies on power to set the exposure, the knob becomes a potentiometer and you're just regulating voltage to the galvonometer/needle/aperture unit.

So the setting (F-Stop) you see displayed, IS the one you are setting it at. Some else useful, is that once you know the variation the 1.5 volt batteries will make on your given camera, you can always take that amount into account when setting the exposure in Manual mode; thus having factored that in, you will always be able to use the builtin light meter.

The NIZO S-481 is a nice camera, much more compact owing to the smaller zoom lens size. Also, that smaller lens allows ease of use of many lower cost filters, after market wide angle lenses, and of course, being able to shoot easily with an Anamorphic lens as well.

Not all Super 8mm cameras require battery power to set them in Manual Exposure mode, but the NIZO S series do. The main thing here for you though, is that it works and works fine. Good luck on your film projects!
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