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Any one used the Panasonic 3DA1


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#1 Phil Connolly

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 06:22 AM

I'm budgeting for a possible 3-D production, the budget levels I'm working with might be too low for a standard dual camera mirror rig.

The Panasonic 3DA1 looks like good cost effective option but I'm worried that it might be too limiting and I'd rather push to do 2D well then 3d badly.

Just wondering if anyone had used it and had anythoughts on the general image quality - does it hold up in 2d? And what the 3d effect is like - can you do close ups or wide shots?

If the project goes any further I'll try and shoot some tests - but wanted to know if I could even consider this camera while seeing if its do-able in 3d for a limited budget.
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#2 Sam Kim

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 02:03 AM

i've been testing it in a rental house and plan on shooting a short on it next month. there are different things i'm hearing about the camera itself (such as that it still needs Horizonatal and Vertical image translation later on even though it's advertised to be perfect in this aspect.

also, because of the inability to change your IA you are limited to what feels like 3D depth. i've seen footage of massive landscape wides that just didn't feel... stereo/3D ish. it was flat and 2D images have felt more 3D. with that said... the word is that the spot for your depth is about 9-25ft. which is a limitation i'm going to try and work with and use the "strong" 3D depth feel only when it's emotionally needed to set it apart from the rest of the film.

i was monitoring off a 3D panasonic monitor and i saw a lot of ghosting but i have yet to find out if it's the monitor or the camera. i'm trying to get my editor to run some tests with me and hopefully but it through some dynamic range and EI tests.

cheers.
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#3 Keith Mottram

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 04:30 PM

Used it a number of times, if you want decent 3D it works well as long as you are not planning on too many close ups as it cannot be closer than a couple of meters in and zooming in does diminish the 3D effect in my opinion. Also noise can be a problem in low light. Never had a problem with vertical alignment appar from some initial beta units. You will always end up doing some horizontal adjustment in post no matter what cam you use. Ghosting can be wrong glasses with monitor, but most likely you haven't set your camera up right...
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#4 Vincent Sweeney

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 05:28 PM

In 2D you will have massive depth. They have, I think, 1/4" chips. I had a class with one and the 3D looked pretty good on the 55" monitors we watched footage on. It was all daylight though so I don't have an opinion on noise.
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#5 Sam Kim

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Posted 18 May 2011 - 10:44 PM

Used it a number of times, if you want decent 3D it works well as long as you are not planning on too many close ups as it cannot be closer than a couple of meters in and zooming in does diminish the 3D effect in my opinion. Also noise can be a problem in low light. Never had a problem with vertical alignment appar from some initial beta units. You will always end up doing some horizontal adjustment in post no matter what cam you use. Ghosting can be wrong glasses with monitor, but most likely you haven't set your camera up right...



ghosting is more of glasses+ monitor thing? i was hoping it'd be that simple. time to ask them to give me all their glasses until i can get it right.
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#6 Phil Connolly

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Posted 25 May 2011 - 10:31 AM

Thanks for the responses - I guess I'm going to have to go and see a demo or shoot some tests. Right now it looks like my main contender for the shoot. Shame the higher end sony 3d cams won't be out in time.

The shoot is going to need some close ups - but its mostly about architecture, so a lot of shots are going have objects in the 9 to 20 feet range. So DOF shouldn't be too much of a problem

But it would be nice if I could get away with the occasional MCU on a person without resorting to a mirror rig.

I'm also looking at using the polecam 3d for some shots and that could get me a wider IO when needed. And the DOF of the panasonic should match the polecam with 1/3 inch Toshiba mini-cams quite well.

I might be going the homebrew approach for post production - so I'm guessing mirror rigs would make that much more challenging - in terms of alignment and CC. If anyone has any recomendations of FCP vs Avid in this area let me know.
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