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Critique My First DP Reel / Reel Tips


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#1 Noah Petrie

Noah Petrie

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 01:32 PM

My first post, woo.

I've just recently decided that cinematography is what I want to pursue in school. I would greatly appreciate any comments or criticisms, whether it be about the shots I chose or the format/pacing/etc. of the reel. Actually, any tips on reels would be awesome since I know I'm going to making more when I get more footage.


Here it is:



Some of my biggest criticisms:

1. I need to show more range. All the material comes from three or four projects that I did this semester, I need more variation in actors and content.

2. I hold on the argument in the bathroom towards the end of the reel for too long. It showcases the actor's performances more than my shots. I was suggested that it would be good to include a full scene, which is what I thought I was doing, but that's not the full scene at all and I could of picked something that wasn't just a shot reverse shot in close up.

3. My info at the end is in an ugly font and I'd like as I got more serious to get a better email and perhaps a website.

Do you think I overuse the light leak effects? I had just spent like 60 bucks on the pack so I was pretty eager to try them out.

Shot on my T2i.

Edited by Noah Petrie, 03 May 2011 - 01:36 PM.

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#2 Adam Ouellette

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Posted 08 May 2011 - 02:27 PM

Everything you've said is pretty accurate.
Personally I thought the light flashes were extremely over used. It could have been a lot shorter. The variety of shots was so few that it just felt very, very long. It did not need to be that long, try highlighting the good shots that aren't of the generic variety. Less two shots, over the shoulders etc. There is not too much special about that, people want to see what you do that is different.

The easiest way to expand your reel is to shoot as many projects as you can and shoot all the time. Don't limit yourself to projects you are shooting for class, abuse the fact that you are going to school for film (im assuming) and talk to your fellow students and filmmakers and just get out there and shoot things. Always be thinking about your next project. I had a similar problem at first at film school until I realized I needed to shoot everything and anything at all times. Just get out there and get shooting pretty much.

Biggest part of being a student, don't spend 60$ on things like light leak effects. That could have been craft services or costuming for your next shoot. Every penny matters. I wish I had known how serious that was a few years ago myself.

Hope that is at least mildly helpful.

Edited by Adam Ouellette, 08 May 2011 - 02:30 PM.

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New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

The Slider

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets