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Processing Tri X (7266) as negative having only HC110 or TMAX at hand... and a Morse G3.


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#1 Luis R Garza

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Posted 30 May 2011 - 08:47 PM

Hello DP's,

Well... I'm a bit of in a problem here... I live in Mexico and it is getting quite hard to find the chemics necessary for the following process:

100' of Tri X (7266), reversal film, to hand process @ home with an old suffering Morse G3. I understand that the idea of processing this film to have a positive result, would be nearly impossible nowadays and having limited access to "strange" chemicals.

So... for now, I'm only able to get HC-110 or TMAX. What would you suggest? What would be the implications on using one or another developer?

One other thing... I've been looking on the Internet but so far, I haven't found conclusive information on steps and processing this film on a Morse G3.

Can anyone help?
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#2 steve waschka

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 09:29 PM

i can respond to the use of the morse g3. it is a good tank. i use it exclusively for 8 and 16. you will probably want to cut your arm off after doing 100' in a reversal process. the only drawback to the morse is it requires you to constantly wind. and for longer times than a static spiral tank. ie: 7 min times become 10.5 or 11 min. do that for neg and its not so bad. now add in all the steps for reversal and you'll wish you had a contact printer. the good news is it will produce perfectly good negatives. provided you are proficient in the darkroom. ie: watch your times, properly store chemicals, follow usage directions, understand conversion tables for bath time for use in a rewind tank vs lg tank vs hand tank, etc. to do neg its 11 min for D76 with alkali added, 3 min for stop, and i fix with hardening fixer till it looks right but prob at least 5min. all with fresh chems. or start adding time to each usage. mount the film ends tight. i fold and staple to create a small loop to go over the peg. and wind non stop. know how many turns ie: 30something for 25ft etc so you dont wind too tight and scratch the film against itself. btw you can get that neg scanned and reverse it in digital editing if you are publishing via web or burning to disc. my prob is i like anamorphics and projectors. have zero income producing use for that process at this time but it beats 16:9 hd every day of the week.

as for the tmax kit im gonna watch the post and see what you get back. ill add in that ive heard it thins the negative. but the inet is full of what people have heard. im ready to order chems, ive got 4 rolls awaiting processing right now. i decided that i am adding too much grain by processing my 7266 and 7265 as neg and would like to just do reversal. thats the decision that keeps me from feeling bad about not wanting to pay for lab contacts, one lites, or my own JK.
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#3 steve waschka

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Posted 09 July 2011 - 10:12 PM

i have finally had the opportunity to use the t-max kit on a few rolls of 7265 and 7266. they are all in the trash. im going to stick with negatives for now. just cant seem to get it right in a morse tank. dont think the tank matters. i get bad results with both 25ft rolls which are only 40 turns (similar chem exposure to static spiral tanks)and 100ft rolls which are 120 turns of the crank. add time dont add time. reuse bleach use new bleach. all looks bad. im clearly doing something wrong but i just cant keep trying to learn new tricks. the problem is its just terrible. plus its got little problems like artifacts in the shadows, wierd blotchy chemical artifacts. just doesnt look like if i nailed the processing, the image would ever look professional. i would suggest if you want good positive camera prints you go to an older kodak formula as described in 7266 and 7265 literature. me? sticking to camera negs. if i burn some really awesome anamorphics i want to project, ill get lab positives made.
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#4 steve waschka

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Posted 09 July 2011 - 10:19 PM

one more note incase you check back and use this info to produce negs. those tank times i posted are for chem temps in the lower range. watch you time adjustment for higher temps. i figured out i was overcooking the tmax kit. dont misunderstand, that didnt help. but i dont want you to hold me to those times above for your negs. those are chem temps in the mids 60's with 100ft rolls. its like a 1/3 to 1/2 sec drop for every increased degree of chem temp. check your film and developer lit. its in there.
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#5 K Borowski

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Posted 09 July 2011 - 11:11 PM

They are BOTH good developers. T-Max will probably give you finer grain (although perhaps less sharpness as well). HC-110 will give you more sharpness.


Be sure to use the correct film speed. For some reason, processing neg as reversal and reversal as neg BOTH WAYS produce loss in speed (you would think one way it would cause a GAIN in speed).


TEST with a grey card; if you can get access to a densitometer and shoot it full frame, it should read in the 0.60 to 0.90 range, forget the exact figure for B&W neg. Will look it up for you.

Any lab with a transmission densitometer can help you, as long as you shoot the grey card filling up basically the whole frame. Then you can be CERTAIN to get the correct development time.



The only three steps you NEED in the tank are DEVELOPMENT, STOP BATH, AND FIXER. You have the developer, you can use vinegar from the grocery store as stop bath, and you want a HARDENING FIXER.

Then I think 5 minutes wash, some sort of archival wash aid if you want to shorten wash time (otherwise it is an entire hour), another minute wash to remove wash aid, and a wetting agent to prevent drying marks (like Kodak Photo Flo, but dish soap will work).

If you want to test to get perfect fixer times, it is, with a piece of the film you clip, doesn't have to be exposed, processed, TWO TIMES the time it takes the silver halides to clear. So if it takes say three minutes for the purple to disappear, fix for six minutes. Fix can be re-used, but times will go up as the silver builds up in solution; this reduces efficiency.

Make sure not to dump silver down the drain. Take it to the photo lab and they can turn the silver in for money :-)



I will see if I can extrapolate times for you, as I know D-96 is comparable to D-76 I can give you starting times for 20 Cels./68 Fahr. temperature.
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#6 steve waschka

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Posted 10 July 2011 - 09:07 AM

I had tunnel vision because i come across your post when am researching reversal developing. Sorry. I thought you meant tmax direct positive developer. Tmax negative developer is good stuff. I use it just not in the morse. I just use d76 plus alkalai because thats what kodak recommends for a rewind tank. Which i use morse. Only because i havent had problems with it and i havent had the opportunity to buy a jobo that will hold 100ft. Im really sorry about that. Tmax will prob work great. It works on every black and white still neg ive ever shold. Ilford fuji kodak all of them. As for a grain comparisoon. I dont know. Its pretty close to the others.
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#7 K Borowski

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Posted 10 July 2011 - 11:49 AM

Sorry, I read it as LOMO (and I own a Morse!).


You'll want to extend all these times, maybe have a prewash. The master on this subject is Martin Baumgarten. The 8mm metadirectory has all the information you'll ever need and then some. . .
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