Jump to content


Photo

How to light a Night- Bathroom scene?


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Simona Analte

Simona Analte
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 44 posts
  • Student

Posted 30 May 2011 - 10:29 PM

Hello!

I am soon going to shoot my first short project for my CV. It's a 30-60 second lactose intolerant commercial.
The story takes place inside a bathroom. A woman lays inside an old tub filled with milk. There will be a wide angle and few close-ups.
Shooting on Canon 5D.

Im having a bit of hard time deciding on how to light this scene.
The bathroom does not have windows. It's night time. Plan on lighting it soft with subdued muted tones.

How can I light to create that mood? What could be the motivating source?
China ball hanging out of the frame? Boost practicals with photofloods?

What would be the advantage and disadvantage of using a tungsten Kinoflo, fresnels or chimera...?


Any advice and help would be very much appreciated :)

Thank you!
  • 0

#2 jun keung cheung

jun keung cheung

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 31 May 2011 - 05:30 PM

Bathrooms normally have one motivated source- day through window or night fluorescent or other. Bathrooms are usually small so wouldn't recommend a Fresnal as it can get very hot in there- but it can be done. A small Kino with diff on a polecat would do it. And some blackwrap to control spill. A chimera would take a lot of room. I would try to keep it simple. Hope this helps.

JC
  • 0

#3 Simona Analte

Simona Analte
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 44 posts
  • Student

Posted 02 June 2011 - 09:51 PM

Thank you for the advice! I'll keep it simple. Thank you
  • 0

#4 Matt Pacini

Matt Pacini
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1246 posts

Posted 05 July 2011 - 05:47 PM

I'm going to assume you are in a small bathroom, and on a budget (both time and money).

I'd either hang something directly overhead, and use bounce cards for fill where you need it, or I'd aim a PAR light at the ceiling from the floor (put a large chunk of foamcore on the ceiling to make sure it bounces white light).
Either way, as stated above, use some black-foil to control spill. I'd keep some of your top-light off the walls with the black foil - you will probably get as much as you need coming off the bounce-fill.


Matt Pacini
  • 0


Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

rebotnix Technologies

Opal

Ritter Battery

The Slider

Abel Cine

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

CineLab

Wooden Camera

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

The Slider

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Visual Products

CineTape

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio